Posts Tagged ‘Mark Farrell’

District Two Supervisor Mark Farrell Crows About Raising $200K for Re-Election

Thursday, January 30th, 2014

Gentle Reader, did you have the foresight to be born in San Francisco? No? I thought not.

Well, that’s why your campaign to unseat incumbent Mark Farrell won’t work.

BTW, did you know that he’s a ”native San Franciscan who grew up in District 2?” And now that you know, he’ll never let you forget it.

The news of the day:

“Supervisor Mark Farrell Reports Raising Over $200,000 for Re-Election Campaign

San Francisco – District 2 Supervisor Mark Farrell announced he has raised over $200,000 in his campaign for re-election to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors.  As of December 31, 2013 Supervisor Farrell reported raising $199,602 from more than 550 donors, representing a wide breadth of supporters from District 2, small business owners, labor leaders and a wide group of San Francisco residents.

 “As a native San Franciscan who grew up in District 2, it is an incredible honor to represent the neighborhoods and residents of District 2 on the Board of Supervisors,” stated Supervisor Farrell.  “I am excited about the success of our fundraising efforts, but I do not take anything for granted, and will continue to work hard and actively engage with the neighborhoods and residents of District 2 throughout the campaign and my tenure in office.” 

 “I am incredibly grateful to everyone who donated to my campaign, no matter how big or small their contributions, and I am humbled by the large number of constituents who have already signed up to support my re-election campaign,” continued Farrell. 

Approximately half of Supervisor Farrell’s contributors are District 2 residents.  Other notable contributors include local political leaders from Lt. Governor Gavin Newsom to Small Business Commission President Steven Adams, labor organizations including Firefighters Local 798 and Laborers Local 261, and civic leaders including Walter and Julia Haas and Diane Wilsey.

 “As we head toward the November election, I look forward to beginning our house party program and connecting in smaller settings with the residents of District 2, sharing ideas and concerns, and working together to make the neighborhoods of District 2 the most vibrant part of our City,” continued Farrell. “My campaign held over 100 house parties in 2010 and I look forward to 100 more in 2014.”

Supervisor Mark Farrell represents District 2 in San Francisco, which includes the Presidio, Marina, Cow Hollow, Pacific Heights, Presidio Heights, Anza Vista, Laurel Heights, Jordan Park, the Lake Street corridor, Sea Cliff and parts of Russian Hill.

First elected in November 2010, Supervisor Farrell currently serves as Chair of the Board of Supervisors Budget and Finance Committee, a founding member of the 2016-2017 Super Bowl Bid Committee, and also serves on eight other local and state Boards and Committees.

Supervisor Farrell’s legislative priorities include advancing policies and projects that boost local economic development, ensure neighborhood vitality, and enhance public safety and quality of life issues that affect all San Franciscans. For more information please visit www.markfarrell.com.

Longtime East Bay Resident and SFGate Advocacy Journalist CW Nevius ID’s Cable Car as a “Hyde Street Trolly”

Monday, January 6th, 2014

(You can take the boy out of the East Bay (and plop him in a SoMA condo), but you can’t take the East Bay out of the boy.)

Gentle Reader, consider CW Nevius and his most recent bit advocating for the oppressed white millionaire homeowners of Russian Hill – this time he’s acting at the behest of Supervisor Mark Farrell (R., District 2)

See that*? 

Click to expand

Now I think the word you’re looking for, CW Nevius, is trolley with an “e,” as in potatoe.

Except it aint a trolley, it’s a cable car.  To wit:

“…electric tram (streetcar), sometimes confused with a cable car.”

And the vehicle code section cited here is wrong:

“The problem, says Deputy City Attorney Buck Delventhal, is California Vehicle Code 21106.1…”

CW Nevius, if you’re going to take the trouble to cite a law, why not take the time to do it the right way? Do you feel overworked, CW? You shouldn’t. Moving on…

And there’s this:

“Stefani says Farrell’s office was unaware of the 1987 law…”

Uh, former law? Or former bill? Did the “law” sunset automatically? And was it ever signed by The Duke in the first place? I don’t think so actually.

You see, CW Nevius, what you should look at are the reasons why the millionaires’ efforts always fail. Try this on for size:

The streets of a city belong to the people of the state, and the use thereof is an inalienable right of every citizen, subject to legislative control or such reasonable regulations as to the traffic thereon or the manner of using them as the legislature may deem wise or proper to adopt and impose.’ … ‘Streets and highways are established and maintained primarily for purposes of travel and transportation by the public, and uses incidental thereto. Such travel may be for either business or pleasure…”

Nevius, why don’t you retire or go back to sports, srsly? Then you’d get replaced by somebody who would do your job better than you, right? Wouldn’t that be a win-win?

But before you do that, why don’t you fix this**`?

“Jose had been struck by a late-’90s, silver, four-door sedan as he stepped off the curb at Oak and Scott.”

“And the intersection of Fell and Scott, where Jose was hit, has consistently been described as one of the city’s most dangerous.”

Fin. 

*Looks like somebody is striking a pose on the crosswalk:

I’m a model you know what I mean
And I do my little turn on the  
Yeah on the catwalk on the crosswalk, yeah
I do my little turn on the crosswalk

**I actually believed The Neve on the Fell and Scott thing, so I was going to go out there a week or two later on a Tuesday night at around the same time on the theory that this was somebody coming home during the evening drive. But then I saw that the actual location was on Oak so now I think the driver isn’t on a commuting schedule. You know, I’ve got a Canon 5D, crank the ISO up to 25,600, use a simple 200mm 2.8 prime to see if I could see some damage and get a plate. I mean it might have been worth the effort.

Russian Hill NIMBYs Give the Game Away: “Supervisor Farrell is Also Looking for Ways to Pitch It Beyond Aesthetics”

Monday, December 16th, 2013

Work with me here, people.

Insight #1: Underground can be used as a verb. As in:

“San Francisco Coalition to Underground Utilities”

The name of this NIMBYhood group looked like a typo to me here. This Coalition to Underground Utilities is a really stupid name for various reasons, IMO.

Insight #2: Supervisor Mark Farrell might look like a doofus, but he’s not.

Of course he owes his narrow election victory to a man named Coates. So if Coates wants something done up here in San Francisco* but it doesn’t increase our commonweal, well, that’s what we’d call a conflict of interest (or everyday politics, take your pick.) Anyway, as District 2 Supervisor, he’s well north of his scionic predecessors, but he’ll be sure to tow the party line (the right of the aisle party line) whether it makes sense or not.

Insight #3: Farrell views these Russian Hill cable-burying aesthetic fetishists just as I do.

Here we go, from Report of Meeting with Supervisors Farrell and Chiu”

“Supervisor Farrell is also looking for ways to pitch it beyond aesthetics.”

Oh really! There just might be something more important out in the world than the aesthetic imperatives of a handful of Russian Hill millionaires who want to give the 415 a makeover and who want to tax every San Francisco renter $50 a year for the “benefit?”

So I suppose we’ll soon hear about the important safety benefits of doing whatever it is these aestheticians can dream up?

Hoo boy.

But IRL, Wires are Life. Wires connect people and move people cheaply and safely. Wires are beautiful, man.

See?

Click to expand, if you can bear it. 

*IDK, like the America’s Cup fiasco? Remember, Coates Likes Boats.

Oh, So _That’s_ What the Central Subway Looks Like – A Giant Hole in the Ground at the Foot of Stockton – “Don’t Dig There!”

Thursday, June 27th, 2013

The Central Subway project might make sense politically (let’s take money from taxpayers from all over America to pay for a big project in our little-big city), but it doesn’t make sense from a transit standpoint.

Down down we go, under Market Street, under the MUNI Metro, and under the BART. When you pass by, you should crumple up all your ones and fives on you and throw them into this sinkhole because that’s what you’re already doing and what you will be doing far far into the future.

Click to expand

Oh, what’s that, “transit justice,” they say? Well, most of the victims of this project live in San Francisco and most of them aren’t caucasoids, so I don’t know what the fuck that phrase means in the context  of this ridiculous scheme.

The project promotes transit justice by providing reliable, efficient, and safe transit for those who live in Chinatown and those who want to visit Chinatown.”

Does City Attorney Dennis Herrera believe this bullshit? No. Does Supervisor Scott Wiener? No. How about closeted Republican Supervisor Mark Farrell? No. How about Board of Supervisors President David Chiu? No.

Oh well.

Don’t dig there and dig it elsewhere
You’re digging it round and it ought to be square
The shape of it is wrong, it’s much too long
And you can’t put a hole where a hole don’t belong

The Hole in the Ground” was a comic song which was written by Myles Rudge and composed by Ted Dicks. When recorded by Bernard Cribbins and released by EMI on the Parlophone label in 1962, it was a hit in the UK charts.[1][2]

The song is about a dispute between a workman digging a hole and an officious busybod y wearing a bowler hat. This exemplifies English class conflict of the era and Cribbins switches between a working class Cockney accent, in which he drops his aitches, and a middle class accent for the gentleman in the bowler hat.

Hey SFMTA! Why Not “Complete” Polk Street All the Way to Grove and Eliminate These Parking Spaces in Front of City Hall?

Friday, April 26th, 2013

OMG, would you look at this?

I mean check out all these deadly, beastly automobiles parked on Polk, the very same street that the SFMTA is trying to “complete” don’t you know:

Click to expand

I know, why don’t you take out all these spaces and replace them with a separated bike lane or something, SFMTA?

After all, Transit First, right?

Oh, what’s that? These are the spaces that the Board of Supervisors and their aides park in for free every day so that’s where you just happened to end your campaign of completion?

But don’t you care about safety, SFMTA?

Mmmmm….

“This project seeks to implement aesthetic and safety improvements for all users of Polk Street between McAllister and Union Streets. In accordance with the City’s Transit First policy, improvements will primarily be focused on people who walk, use transit and ride a bicycle along Polk Street. The project is funded by Proposition B General Obligation Bonds and is part of an overall citywide effort to curb pedestrian and bicycle collisions and to provide a safe north-south connection for people on bicycles. Pedestrian and bicyclist collision and injury data on Polk Street point to a corridor in need of safety improvements for all those who share the road. In fact, the southern portion from Sacramento to McAllister Streets is part of the 5% of San Francisco streets that have more than half of the City’s most severe pedestrian collisions.”

Did Mark Farrell Really Throw the Ceremonial First Pitch at the Giants Home Opener? No – Hello, Examiner?

Monday, April 15th, 2013

Let’s see here, is it really true, as this San Francisco Examiner source greaser reports, that:

Last weekend, Supervisor Mark Farrell threw out the ceremonial first pitch at the home opener of our beloved Giants.”

Oh no.

Lord no.

Now let’s take a look at who really threw out the Ceremonial First Pitch at the recent Giants Home Opener on April 5th, 2013:

San Francisco Giants third baseman Pablo Sandoval, left, and second baseman Marco Scutaro throw the ceremonial first pitch before a baseball game against the St. Louis Cardinals on Friday, April 5, 2013 in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, Pool)”

That’s right. It was Panda and Scutaro.

But it’s understandable that there was confusion, right? Check it:

“Supervisor Mark Farrell says he’s throwing out first pitch at #SFGiants Opening Day #sfbos

And there was this, from Mark Farrell’s excitable aide, Jess Montejano:

“Getting Ready 2 Hit Da Field! #OpeningDay #SFGiants @ AT&T Park http://instagram.com/p/XvCFQPKQd6/ 

Hey, here’s a clue:

“Turns out Farrell was at the “ceremonial” first pitch that happened at the start of festivities around 12:45 #SFGiants

But hold on, doesn’t the ceremonial first pitch “mark the end of pregame festivities and the start of the game?”

Yes. Yes it does.

So then is this true?

Farrell now joins the ranks of politicians such as President Bill Clinton, who threw out the first pitch at the new AT&T Park in 2000, and then-Vice President Richard Nixon, who threw out the first pitch at Candlestick Park in 1960.

No. Not at all.

Oh well.

Sorry to be so nitpicky, but, after all:

It’s the details folks. Pay attention to the details and make them a priority. Details make or break what you’re trying to do.”

Marina District Gratified by All the White People Who Showed Up for America’s Cup – But Says No to Regular Tourists

Tuesday, September 11th, 2012

Work with me here. The recent America’s Cup scrimmage event up in San Francisco’s Great White North got this kind of reaction in the pages of the Marina Times:

“This event brought exactly the right kind of crowd to the Marina.”

Uh, white people with some extra folding money to spend – that kind of crowd?

Mmmm…

Anyway, you’d think that the friendly Marinites would similarly welcome the Feds landing Alcatraz tour boats at Fort Mason, right?

No.

Let’s hear from socially awkward, born-into-the-one-percent District Two Supervisor Mark Farrell in the very same pages of the Marina Times:

“The National Park Service’s (NPS) intention to study Fort Mason as a possible location for its Alcatraz tour ferry service is one of those ideas with serious and long-lasting impacts that must immediately be put to rest.”

(Yeah, it’s one of those ideas, huh? So like, Alex, I want “Ideas with serious and long-lasting impacts that must immediately be put to rest” for $1600?”)

Apparently, one set of aquatic tourists is the best thing in the world and another set of aquatic tourists is the worst thing in the world?

OK fine.

Hey Marina, look at this! You think the future can’t cross a bridge ride through a tunnel?

Now here’s the kicker. The reason why the white people of the Marina are worried about the Fort Mason proposal is that it’s a lead pipe cinch, owing to the lack of NIMBY laws on federal land:

“What makes the idea even more distressing to residents and establishments in the Marina is the lack of local environmental review and input that would be available. The NPS stated that environmental review of the Fort Mason site would be conducted under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and not under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), because Fort Mason is federal property. Without a CEQA process in place for Fort Mason, the enormous changes contemplated in the Marina will never be considered by our local government, and any NEPA appeal would have to take place in Washington through the federal courts. In my letter to the NPS, I asked that since they are prepared to undergo a CEQA analysis for the sites located at the Port of San Francisco piers, they should do the same for the NPS-owned piers at Fort Mason…”

So, don’t come here, Feds. Don’t come here where it’s super easy to do business, you know, without dealing with millionaire NIMBYs for decades, oh no, don’t even think about it! Feds, you must immediately put the idea “to rest.”

Well, we’ll just have to wait and see how that works…

Do You Think the Rich White People of the Marina District Want a Ferry Landing at Fort Mason? Hells No!

Friday, August 3rd, 2012

Our National Park Service is thinking about moving the Alcatraz ferry landing from Fisherman’s Wharf to Fort Mason. And maybe they’d go to other places like the Marin Headlands or Sausalito.

Sounds all right to me, but the Marina Community Association is not pleased with the idea of all those non-white people messing things up in the Great White North of San Francisco.

Now, let’s hear from the King of the NIMBYs, District Two Supervisor Mark Farrell:

Check it:

“Adding the potential of 5,000 visitors per day or 35,000 visitors per week will more than double the population of the Marina…”

Except that adding the potential of 5,000 visitors per day or 35,000 visitors per week would not more than double the population of the Marina.

So there’s that.

Anyway, go for it, Feds, go for Fort Mason, why not?

All the deets:

Notice Of Intent To Prepare An Environmental Impact Statement For Alcatraz Ferry Embarkation Site.

In accordance with § 102(2)(C) of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, and pursuant to the Council on Environmental Quality’s regulations (40 CFR parts 1500-08), the National Park Service (NPS) is initiating the conservation planning and environmental impact analysis process for the proposed establishment of a long-term ferry embarkation site for passenger ferry service between the northern San Francisco waterfront and Alcatraz Island. In addition to considering the Alcatraz Ferry Embarkation site, the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) will also evaluate potential for a secondary ferry transit service offering a cross-bay connection from the San Francisco embarkation site to Sausalito and/or Fort Baker. NPS is the lead federal agency for the environmental review under NEPA, and is developing the project in coordination with the Port of San Francisco (Port) and City and County of San Francisco (City) planning and transportation agencies.Show citation box

As set forth in 36 CFR 800.8(c), the NPS is also using the NEPA process to fulfill certain provisions of § 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act related to consultation and public involvement. In addition, the NPS has requested that the Port and the City be cooperating agencies for the EIS. In the event that a site on Port property is identified as the preferred alternative, environmental review of the project pursuant to the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) would be required, and would be initiated at a later date.Show citation box

All scoping comments must be postmarked or transmitted not later than July 31, 2012.Show citation box

Background: Alcatraz Island, the site of pre-Civil War fortifications, was the nation’s first military prison. It later became the most notorious maximum security penitentiary in the United States, and subsequently was the site of the occupation that helped ignite the movement for American Indian self-determination. Over 1.4 million people visit Alcatraz Island annually from the existing ferry embarkation site at Pier 311/2in San Francisco, managed by Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA). The Alcatraz Ferry Embarkation EIS will build upon several studies completed by NPS, the Port, the City, the State of California, and the California Water Emergency Transportation Authority (WETA; formerly the Water Transit Authority).Show citation box

A 2011 draft feasibility study identified potential sites for consideration located among GGNRA, Fisherman’s Wharf, and the northern Embarcadero. The sites studied included Port piers 191/2, 291/2, 311/2, 41, and 45, and GGNRA piers 1, 2, 3, and 4 at Fort Mason. If suggested during scoping, other sites that meet the project purpose and need could also be considered. The draft feasibility study and subsequent investigations also analyzed the surrounding area, identified the programs and facilities needed to operate the sites, existing conditions at the sites, and criteria to evaluate the sites.Show citation box

The NPS seeks to secure a site on the northern San Francisco waterfront that provides for a long-term (50 years or more) orientation and ferry embarkation facility for visitors to Alcatraz Island. NPS desires an identifiable, adequate, and quality visitor welcome and support area that begins to connect visitors to Alcatraz history, GGNRA, and the national park system. The NPS also seeks to establish ferry connections between the embarkation site and existing piers at Sausalito and/or at Fort Baker, which is managed by GGNRA.Show citation box

The need for the project is driven by the following factors:Show citation box

  • Alcatraz ferry service is currently subject to location changes every 10 years which has led to visitor confusion, community concerns, and inconsistency in visitor support services.Show citation box
  • Ability to make improvements at the existing site is constrained by lease provisions between the Port and the concessioner, with substantial amounts of revenue spent on rent, reducing the amount available to invest on Alcatraz and other GGNRA sites.Show citation box
  • The condition of existing facilities constrains and negatively affects NPS and the concessioners’ abilities to create a recognizable identity and quality visitor experience.Show citation box
  • The current facility has insufficient space to appropriately orient visitors to Alcatraz or provide information to the many visitors who are unable to visit Alcatraz.Show citation box
  • There is very limited opportunity to provide cross-bay ferry service to other GGNRA areas.Show citation box

The objectives for this project include creating a ferry embarkation site that:Show citation box

  • Establishes a long-term (50 years or more) primary location for visitor access to Alcatraz Island.Show citation box
  • Is economically feasible and sustainable, and generates revenue for investment on Alcatraz and other park facilities and visitor programs.Show citation box
  • Accommodates critical visitor and operational programs and facilities, and provides for efficient land and vessel operations.Show citation box
  • Provides an identifiable area for quality welcome, orientation, and interpretation of the natural, cultural, scenic and recreational resources of Alcatraz, the larger GGNRA, and the national park system.Show citation box
  • Provides facilities for cross-bay ferry service to accommodate existing and future visitor demand for travel to Alcatraz Island, Muir Woods, and the Marin Headlands.Show citation box

Public Scoping Comments and Further Information: This notice serves to formally open the agency and public scoping comment phase for this EIS. Key impact topics which are expected to be addressed in the EIS include transportation, visitor experience, aesthetics, economics, cultural resources, natural resources, and air quality—however, agencies, members of the public, and interested organizations are encouraged to provide any comments on the spectrum of issues and concerns that should be addressed. Respondents will also assist with defining a suitable range of alternatives; advise on the nature and extent of potential environmental impacts, including natural, cultural, socioeconomic and other topics; and suggest possible mitigation strategies that would reduce potential impacts from project development.Show citation box

Several public scoping meetings will be scheduled in San Francisco and Marin Counties. Meeting dates, times, and locations will be publicized through local and regional news media, by email to the park mailing list (to be included on the EIS email list, please visit: www.nps.gov/goga and click the “Join the Mailing List” link), and via the project Web site http://parkplanning.nps.gov/ALCAembarkation. This Web site will also provide relevant information, including the project description, planning process updates, meeting notices, reports and documents, and useful links associated with the project. You may also contact theGGNRA Planning Division at goga_planning@nps.gov or (415) 561-4700 for further information.Show citation box

ADDRESSES: Written comments should be mailed to the following address: Superintendent, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, Attn: Alcatraz Ferry Embarkation EIS, Fort Mason, Bldg. 201, San Francisco, CA 94123. Before including your address, phone number, email address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so.Show citation box

Decision Process: At this time, it is anticipated that the Draft EIS will be available for public review in mid-2013. Availability of the document for review will be announced by the publication of a Notice of Availability in the Federal Register, through local and regional news media, via the project Web site, and by email to project email recipients. Additional public meetings will be held after the Draft EIS is distributed to provide further opportunities to comment on the proposed project. Following due consideration of all comments received on the Draft EIS, preparation of the Final EIS is anticipated to be completed in 2014. As a delegated EIS, the official responsible for the final decision regarding the proposed ferry embarkation site is the NPS Regional Director, Pacific West Region. Subsequently, the official responsible for implementation will be the GGNRA Superintendent.Show citation box

Dated: April 6, 2012.

Patricia L. Neubacher,

Acting Regional Director, Pacific West Region.

Presenting Your New Freeway Tunnel in the Presidio

Wednesday, March 7th, 2012

I don’t know, do you care about this kind of stuff? I don’t.

I care more about, I don’t know, Fake Patois and DARPA cheetahs and whatnot.

But I certainly don’t care about born-into-the-one-percent, supercracker Supervisor Mark Farrell, who stood me and another Supe up on the steps of City Hall* back in the day, and/or the plans for the new freeway in the Presidio.

Wow, a tunnel. It looks every other, right?

*I don’t know, if you don’t want to do something then you say, “I don’t want to do this.” Or, better yet, say nothing, same message. But what you don’t do is say you’re going to do something and then blow it off. That’s pretty fucking basic, I think.

OMG, Meet and Talk With Mayor Ed Lee and Supervisor Mark Farrell at the Plan C Fundraiser at TA48

Tuesday, June 14th, 2011

TA stands for the TransAmerica Building and 48 is the floor number. (Don’t think I’ve ever been that up in The Pyramid, but I know there’s not much floor space up there – it’ll be quite cozy, I’m sure.)

Linda Post of the indispensable SF FYI Net has all the deets:

Plan C – Annual Fundraiser
When: June 22, 2011 – Wednesday
5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Where: Transamerica Pyramid Penthouse, 600 Montgomery, 48th Floor, San Francisco
What: Plan C Annual Fundraiser. Mayor Ed Lee and Supervisor Mark Farrell will be speakers.
Event Co-Chairs: Mark Kelleher, Mike Sullivan, Steve Adams
Plan C Board: Steve Adams, Mike Sullivan, Bob Gain, Kat Anderson, Randy Brasche, David Fix, Baha Hariri, Amanda Jones, Mark Kelleher, Ashley Lyon, Lyssa Paul
$75. non-member includes Plan C membership, $50. Member
RSVP – Information: http://plancsf2011fundraiser.eventbrite.com/

Oh, here are ever more deets, below.

See you there.*

Annual Plan C Fundraiser Event

Please join Plan C board members and friends at the 10th anniversary of our annual fundraiser on Wednesday, June 22, 2011 from 5:30pm to 7:30pm to celebrate our recent victories – and, most importantly, to discuss our plans going forward.

The night’s featured speakers will be San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee, and Supervisor Mark Farrell.

After a decade of hard work and persistence, we have much to celebrate this year with the election of a more moderate Board of Supervisors and many other accomplishments!

Plan C played a direct role in helping elect moderate supervisors Scott Wiener and Mark Farrell, and ensure passage of the Sit/Lie Ordinance and other initiatives. More recently, we worked to promote the payroll tax waiver to keep Twitter in San Francisco and encourage a mid-Market Street economic rebirth.

You can help us build upon our recent successes. Much depends on this coming November’s mayoral race, the first time ranked choice system will be engaged for a mayor’s election. You can count on Plan C, as San Franciscans have since 2001, to provide you with the city’s most widely used moderate voting guide.

Please join us as a sponsor for our 10th Anniversary fundraiser on June 22. Organizational and individual sponsors will be listed as co-hosts, hosts and premier hosts on event invitations, email reminders and signage. Hosts at all levels will receive tickets to the event, the quantity commensurate with donation level. Individual hosts at all levels will receive a one year paid Plan C membership with voting rights.

RSVP and Donate: For more details about giving levels and benefits, click here to sign up for our host committee or join as an individual sponsor.

The Details:

Date/Time: Wednesday, June 22nd, 2011
Time: 5:30 – 7:30 PM
Location: Transamerica Pyramid — 48th Floor Penthouse, 600 Montgomery Street at Clay

Thank you for your support!

*Maybe**

**Srsly***

***Uh oh…