Posts Tagged ‘MD’

Know Your UCSF Doctors: Hey Look, It’s Dr. Pam Ling, the Med Student from MTV’s “The Real World San Francisco” in 1994

Thursday, September 6th, 2012

You’re too young to remember the era before the Internet, but back in the day, MTV was all we had.* So it was a BFD when the MTV came to town to stage a reality show back in 1994.

Pamela Ling was one of the characters. She played a medical student, which wasn’t hard, because, you know, she was a med student at the time.

Anyway, she became a doctor at UCSF and that where she labors some 18 years later.

See?

Oh, and there was Puck, who pretended to be a bike messenger.

Man, some real bike messengers didn’t like him. That’s what I recall.

Ah mem’ries…

*Well, not me. Cable’s for suckers, these days and back in the day. I think my friend would videotape this show and then we’d watch it off of the VHS.

 

Assemblymember Tom Ammiano is Sponsoring Free Skin Cancer Screenings at UCSF on Divisadero Tomorrow Saturday, April 21st

Friday, April 20th, 2012

Hey look, it’s free!

And no co-payment neither.

Here’s the crew who’ll be waiting for you, or at least this was the crew at one of UCSF’s recent screenings in Chinatown:

Click to expand

Free Skin Cancer Screening at UCSF

WHAT: In honor of National Skin Cancer Awareness Month, the UCSF Department of Dermatology is offering free skin cancer screenings. The event is co-sponsored by Assemblyman Tom Ammiano. No appointment is necessary and no insurance is required.

WHEN: Saturday, April 21, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. The screenings will take approximately 30 minutes.

WHERE: 1701 Divisadero Street, third floor, San Francisco.

WHY: Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer, with more than three million skin cancers diagnosed annually in some two million people in the United States. More new cases of skin cancer are diagnosed each year than the combined totals of breast, prostate, lung and colon cancers. Melanoma is the most common form of cancer for young adults 25 to 29 years old. Anyone can develop skin cancer, regardless of skin color or general health. Many can be easily treated when detected early.

About UCSF Medical Center

UCSF Medical Center consistently ranks as one of the top 10 hospitals in the United States. Recognized for innovative treatments, advanced technology, collaboration among health care professionals and scientists, and a highly compassionate patient care team, UCSF Medical Center serves as the academic medical center of the University of California, San Francisco. The medical center’s nationally preeminent programs include children’s health, the brain and nervous system, organ transplantation, women’s health and cancer. It operates as a self-supporting enterprise within UCSF and generates its own revenues to cover the operating costs of providing patient care.

Follow UCSF Medical Center on www.facebook.com/UCSFMedicalCenter or on Twitter @UCSFHospitals.

Site of OccupySF: “THIS IS NOT A DEMOCRACY”

Tuesday, January 10th, 2012

From left:

Hula Hoop girl, fence keeping Occupiers out of OccupySF, giant ornamental bocce ball, and “THIS IS NOT A DEMOCRACY.”

Click to expand

And I think the military dude used to be in S.L.U.G.

It all ties together. (We’re through the looking-glass, people!)

It’s Food Day: Watch “Food Deserts: Legal, Social, and Public Health Challenges” Live from UC Hastings at 1:00 PM

Monday, October 24th, 2011

OMG, it’s Food Day 2011, so check the link to see what’s going on about the Bay Area today.

Here’s the manifesto:

At UC Hastings in Civic Center, the UCSF / UC Hastings Consortium on Law, Science & Health Policy will put on Food Deserts: Legal, Social, and Public Health Challenges starting at 1:00 PM.

Watch it on the livestream, why not? Or see about heading over to this free event yourself.

All the deets:

“Food Deserts: Legal, Social, and Public Health Challenges

Start: 10/24/2011 from 1:00 PM to 7:00 PM
Location: 200 McAllister, Alumni Reception Center

The UCSF / UC Hastings Consortium on Law, Science & Health Policy is sponsoring a conference entitled “Food Deserts: Legal, Social, and Public Health Challenges” on Food Day, October 24, 2011.
The conference will bring together scholars from the health sciences and the law, as well as policymakers, activists, and food industry members, to discuss two important aspects of “food deserts,” places where access to a nutritionally-adequate diet is severely restricted.

One panel, Nourishing Our Neighborhoods: Insights from Law, Planning, and Industry, will cover the broad issue of geographical food deserts, usually urban areas inhabited by mostly-poor people whose transportation and finances are limited, where food sellers are predominantly small stores that cannot stock a wide variety of fresh food items, and where full-service grocery stores hesitate to locate. Are there policies (such as those in zoning rules) that could be changed to enable oases in these food deserts? What impact does, for example, the addition of a full-service grocery store have on the health of the neighboring area?

Another panel, Food and Nutrition in Correctional Institutions, will consider issues relevant to prisons and jails. While food offerings must meet certain basic caloric and nutritional requirements, the institutional nature of food preparation and food service might make that food less than appealing, and the healthier elements of meals might well be those not regularly or fully consumed. The supplemental food offerings – those for sale in these institutions – are not likely to be nutritious. Some research suggests that improved nutrition in prisons leads to improved penal outcomes. If that is so, what policy changes should be implemented? Would such changes be cost-beneficial, considering penal outcomes and the government’s responsibility for health care of prisoners?

At 5 pm, Dr. David Kessler, former Commissioner of the United States Food and Drug Administration and Professor of Pediatrics and Epidemiology and Biostatistics, UCSF, will give the keynote address on The End of Overeating. This conference will be free and open to the public.”

Ever more deets after the jump

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Harsh: Physician of Slain BART Passenger Charles Hill Criticizes BART Police – She Will Attend OpBART III Protest

Sunday, August 28th, 2011

Jessica Lum of Mission Local has the deets on Rupa Marya, MD, who will be there at Civic Center for OpBART III – Tokyo Drift on Monday, August 29th, 2011.

Here’s here “Dear San Francisco” letter, below.

“Dear San Francisco,

I am one of your local physicians and have taken care of many different kinds of people during the past 9 years of my appointment as an internist at UCSF, where I have worked at SF General Hospital as well as at the VA and the UCSF campuses. San Francisco is a surprisingly small town, and when you spend enough time in the health care industry, you come to recognize many of the city’s residents. You hold their stories and watch over them, in the hospital when they are ill and in the chance occurrences of running into them on the streets, in the market or painting the town red. It is an honor and great privilege to take care of the people of this city that I love so dearly.

Last month, I learned that one of my former patients Charles Hill was shot and killed by BART police. Per the police, he was armed with a bottle and a knife and had menacing behavior. Per eye witnesses, he was altered and appeared to be intoxicated but did not represent a lethal danger. I remember Charles vividly, having taken care of him several times in the revolving door which is the health care system for the people who do not fit neatly into society. Charles was a member of the invisible class of people in SF–mentally ill, homeless and not reliably connected to the help he needed. While I had seen him agitated before and while I can’t speak to all of his behavior, I never would have described him as threatening in such a way as to warrant the use of deadly force. We often have to deal with agitated sometimes even violent patients in the hospital. Through teamwork, tools and training, we have not had to fatally wound our patients in order to subdue them. I understand the police are there to protect us and react to the situation around them, but I wonder why the officer who shot Charles did not aim for the leg if he felt the need to use a gun, instead of his vital organs. I wonder if he possessed other training methods to subdue an agitated man with a knife or bottle.

I feel this situation quite deeply. It is hard to watch our civil servants (police) brutally handle a person and their body when i spend my time and energy as a civil servant (physician) honoring the dignity of that person, regardless of their race or social class, their beliefs or their affiliations. I know it is not my job–nor the police’s job—to mete out justice or judgment of a person’s worthiness. It is also hard because Charles has no voice, no one to speak for him now that he is gone. It would be easy to let this slide and move on with our busy lives, as we all struggle to make ends meet in this expensive city during a recession. I believe this situation shows us how powerless we all feel to some degree.

I feel outraged and am trying to find the best ways to express it–through creative outpouring, through conversations. I would like to lend my voice to the growing protest of the BART police’s excessive use of violent force and know that weekly protests are being organized on Mondays until demands are met for BART to fully investigate the shooting of Charles Hill, disarm its police force and train them properly, as well as bringing the officer who shot him to justice. The media is portraying the annoyance of the protests to commuters more than the unbelievable horror that an innocent man was shot dead by the force that is meant to protect us. I don’t want to upset commuters or be a nuisance. I would like to be part of educating and not letting this slip under the proverbial rug, in honor of Charles Hill and in order to help prevent something like this from ever happening again.

I will be present at the peaceful demonstrations on Mondays in front of the BART Civic Center station, not to prevent commuters from getting home, but to educate a population that may need to pause and think about the value a human life has and the kind of San Francisco we want to live and work in.

Thank you for your time and thoughtful consideration.

Respectfully,

Rupa Marya, MD”

Oh Marin, You So Crazy (OMYSC)! Plastic Surgeon’s $2 Million Lawsuit Against Yelp Reviewer Gets Reverse Pwned

Friday, June 24th, 2011

(Gentle Readers, you know that I love you, all 14 of you, no matter what. But others, well, they only care about cosmetic-type things – they’ll like you better if you pay somebody to shoot protein into your face, oh well.)

Can you imagine making a post on the Yelp about your plastic surgeon and then getting hit with a multi-million dollar defamation (plus invasion of privacy plus interference with prospective economic advantage, you know, the whole megillah) lawsuit?

Well, check out the Marin IJ for the sad story of Dr. Kimberly Henry‘s pwnage from Judge Roy Chernus. Wow.

Oh, and surprise, they’re talking about this case on the Yelp.

A little of this, and now you’re beautiful!

Via Y_tambe

Forty reviews are no longer standing for Dr. Kimberly A Henry,  but three are still there.

Anyway, Only in Marin, as they say…

OMG, Skin Cancer Screening in Chinatown – See a UCSF Doctor for Free – Saturday, May 7th – Ends at 4PM

Saturday, May 7th, 2011

[This event turned out to be a huge success, with a bigger turnout than a recent effort in the Mission District. This one's all over but I'll post about the next one when it happens.*]

Our UCSF Department of Dermatology is bringing it today in C-Town. Check out all the deets below.

Drs. Ortiz and Wei and UCSF professionals and volunteers are waiting to see you right now – no appointment necessary:

Click to expand

In Chinese first:

(本報訊)

五月是全國皮膚癌關注月,加州大學三藩市分校皮膚病學系於明日(星期六)上午8時30分至下午4時在華埠舉辦一項免費皮膚癌檢查活動。皮膚癌是一種最常見的癌症,每年有超過百萬人被診斷患上這病。任何人仕,無論膚色或健康狀況,都可能罹患上皮膚癌。

*皮膚癌和黑色素瘤約佔所有診斷出癌病的50%

*皮膚癌是一種比較可以預防的癌病

*超過90%的皮膚癌是由於過度暴露在陽光下所造成

*五分之一的美國人患上皮膚癌

*每小時有1人死於皮膚癌

*亞裔比白人有較大機會被診斷出患有晚期黑色素瘤。

及早檢測對診斷潛伏的黑色素瘤非常重要。這次檢測毋須預約,整個過程約30分鐘。華埠公共衛生局地址: Mason 街1490號 (夾 Broadway 街)。

欲知詳情,請致電加州大學三藩市分校,電話:415-467-3206。

And now back to English:

UCSF to Offer Free Skin Cancer Screenings in Chinatown

WHAT: The UCSF Department of Dermatology, in partnership with the San Francisco Board of Supervisors and the Chinatown Public Health Clinic, will offer free skin cancer screenings in Chinatown to mark National Skin Cancer Awareness Month.

UCSF faculty and residents will perform the screenings. Translation services will be provided.

Early detection is key to diagnosing potential cases of melanoma. No appointment is necessary and screenings will take approximately 30 minutes.

WHEN:
Saturday, May 7, 2011
8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.

WHERE:
Chinatown Public Health Center
1490 Mason Street @ Broadway
San Francisco, CA 94133

WHY: Skin cancer is one of the most common types of cancer, with over one million people diagnosed each year. Anyone can develop skin cancer, regardless of their skin color or general health.

  • Skin cancer and melanoma account for about 50 percent of all types of cancers diagnosed;
  • Skin cancer is one of the more preventable types of cancer;
  • More than 90 percent of skin cancer is caused by excessive exposure to the sun;
  • One in five Americans will develop skin cancer in the course of a lifetime;
  • Each hour, one person dies from skin cancer;
  • Asian American melanoma patients have a greater tendency than Caucasians to have advanced disease at diagnosis.

See you there!

*Assuming I survive the Great San Francisco Blog War of 2011.

WWW.SmokeFreeMovies.UCSF.EDU What? Apparently, UCSF Doesn’t Want CA to Subsidize Films that Depict Smoking

Wednesday, February 23rd, 2011

Did you know that the state of California subsidizes movie production Down Hollywood Way to the tune of $100,000,000 a year? Well, some people want the Sacramento to cut off this source of movie funding for films that depict smoking, that’s the news of the day.

Did The Social Network glamorize smoking as far as you remember? I don’t recall, but it will win a few Oscars on Sunday so it’s as good a target as any, I s’pose. Here’s the closest I could find to a still that has somebody smoking:

(Hey, why does California subsidize film production in the first place? Shouldn’t Jerry Brown or somebody cut off this kind of corporate welfare tout de suite?)

All the deets, here and after the jump:

California Health Experts Fault State’s $100 Million Movie Subsidy, Ask for Reform - L.A. County’s health chief and the chair of California’s expert committee on tobacco control want future film projects with smoking made ineligible for millions in California tax credits

SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 23, 2011 — Should California taxpayers invest millions of dollars to prevent youth smoking, then hand millions to studios whose films promote youth smoking?

That’s the contradiction spotlighted in separate letters to the California Film Commission released today from Jonathan Fielding, MD, director of L.A. County’s Department of Public Health, and Michael Ong, MD, chair of the Tobacco Education and Research Oversight Committee, which is mandated by the legislature to guide state tobacco prevention efforts.

Dr. Fielding’s letter, dated January 14, notes that two recent Sony blockbusters, The Social Network and Burlesque, both rated PG-13 and featuring tobacco imagery, qualified for more than $12 million in California tax credits through a $100 million a year program that began its payouts on January 1, 2011. (The two films have grossed $135 million so far.) “Any benefit that tobacco-related subsidies for films might have for California’s interstate competitiveness must be balanced against proven, catastrophic ‘collateral damage’ to young audiences and long-term health costs to the state,” the letter says.

Dr. Ong’s letter, dated February 18, reports that “approximately 44 percent of adolescent smoking initiation can be attributed to exposure to onscreen smoking” and 100,000 high school students in California are currently smokers as a result of this exposure. “It is unconscionable that one state program threatens to undermine our state’s public health achievements and goals, our investment in tobacco prevention, and our savings in health care costs, particularly in a time of declining state revenues,” the letter says.

Both letters urge that future film projects with smoking be made ineligible for taxpayer subsidies in California. Similar reforms are advocated by health groups in New York, New Mexico, Ontario and British Columbia, all major sources of film production subsidies. In 2008, U.S. states granted an estimated $500 million in production subsidies to youth-rated films with smoking, rivaling the $518 million they will spend for tobacco prevention in 2011.

Also today, the Smoke Free Movies campaign based at University of California, San Francisco, published a full-page ad in Variety and The Hollywood Reporter noting that two-thirds of Oscar®-nominated films this year include smoking and forty percent of these are rated PG or PG-13. The ad centers on the new animated film Rango (Viacom: Paramount and Nickelodeon) opening March 4. Headline: “How many studio execs did it take to OK smoking in a ‘PG’ movie?” California already makes animated films ineligible for public subsidy. The ad can be seen at www.smokefreemovies.ucsf.edu/ourads/index.html.

SOURCE University of California, San Francisco, Smoke Free Movies Initiative

University of California, San Francisco, Smoke Free Movies Initiative

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San Francisco Launches FC2 Female Condom Campaign – Female Health Company Supports Effort

Monday, February 14th, 2011

Uh, “female initiated?” Uh…

Uh, “controlled by women?” Uh…

(All right, I guess in a Wikileaks situation, there is more control, I’ll give them that…)

Uh, “STI?” That’s a new one on me. (Sounds better than “STD,” though, in’nt?)

All the deets. Appears as if this is another one of those public-private partnerships, for better or worse…

“San Francisco Launches Female Condom Campaign – Female Health Company Supports San Francisco’s Campaign to Promote the FC2 Female Condom® for Safer Sex and HIV Prevention

SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 14, 2011 — The Female Health Company (FHC) (Nasdaq: FHCO) is supporting the launch of San Francisco’s social marketing campaign to raise awareness and use of the FC2 Female Condom® among people living at risk of HIV infection. The FC2 Female Condom remains the only FDA-approved method of female-initiated HIV prevention available. FHC is working actively with public health departments and other partners to introduce FC2 in U.S. cities with the highest HIV prevalence rates.

According to the San Francisco Department of Public Health, from the first recorded cases of AIDS in 1981 through 2009, the city reported 19,080 AIDS deaths. At the end of 2009, nearly 16,000 San Franciscans were living with HIV infection. The city currently accounts for about 18 percent of all AIDS cases in California.

“I am very pleased to see such community excitement about the FC2 being available in our city. It is so important to give our communities another good option for taking control of the sexual health,” said Susan Phillip, MD, Director of STD Prevention and Control, for San Francisco Department of Public Health.

The city’s multifaceted communications and marketing effort is being conducted to promote the FC2 female condom as both an acceptable and affordable HIV prevention option. With funding and technical support provided by FHC and other partners, it is sponsoring train-the-trainer programs to equip San Francisco and Bay Area service organizations with the necessary skills to promote female condom usage amongst their clientele.

Ever more deets, after the jump

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All Those Airplanes Making Noise Over San Francisco are Landing at OAKland – A Rare and Dangerous Fed-Ex MD-11 Jumbo

Monday, November 22nd, 2010

Here’s a recent view from the Western Addition towards the west, so the giant American flag you can see is indicating an atypical stiff breeze from the south, more or less.

Airline passengers don’t fly in three-engined tri-jets anymore because the concept isn’t fit for the 21st century. But the stuff you order on the Amazon rides old-school Fed-Ex Cargo McDonnell Douglas DC-10‘s and MD-11‘s all the time.

Now, the DC-10 got a bad rep about three decades back – some of that wasn’t its fault (like when a pilot heard 1500 feet instead of 1500 meters) but some of it was. So Mickey D came out with a replacement, the MD-11. It was better in a lot of ways but it turned out to be more crashy than its predecessor and that’s a whole story in itself.*

Anyway, these MD trijets generally do fine when they land facing straight into the wind, as here:

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Stay safe in your pterodactyls, in your flying dinosaurs, Fed-Ex pilots!

*Like how they made the landing gear stronger to handle the stretched body, so they’re stronger than the wing they’re hanging from – that situation has killed passengers and pilots. McDonnell Douglas simply tried way too hard to make up for the fact that its only jumbo design just happened to have an unnecessary third engine sucking up a lot of fuel.