Posts Tagged ‘media’

Grafittied Ped-Mount Newspaper Racks: Willie Brown’s Real Legacy

Wednesday, January 1st, 2014

Hey, did our representatives just name a bridge span after Willie Brown?

It’s hard to tell, as there aren’t any signs anywhere with his name on it posted on or around the bridge AFAIK.

So what’s stopping pols from changing the name of the span to honor somebody more deserving, you know, after Willie Brown, you know, moves on and therefore can’t get revenge on whomever?

Anyway, here’s his real legacy – it’s a tax / fee on the media that he put through because WIllie Brown didn’t like what some in the media were saying about him back in the 1990′s.

This is in the Western A, two blocks from the megachurch that’s been associated with WB for more than a half-decade AND two blocks from the former church of “Friend of Willie” Jim Jones:

Click to expand

Willie Brown wasn’t born evil. Simply, he learned the wrong things from the wrong people after he came to California.

Oh well.

Bay Area Media Road Trip: “Investigative Hearing on Asiana Flight 214″ – Dec. 10-11 in Wash DC

Thursday, December 5th, 2013

This is it, this is the big one. Details below.

And if you don’t think that PILOT ERROR was the primary cause of death of the only passengers killed in a Boeing 777 in its entire two decade history, well, I have a drug test for you, you know, one just like the drug and alcohol tests that WEREN’T GIVEN to the three Asiana pilots who were on the flight deck on Flight 214.

And hey, could it have been Sully who emailed the fake pilot names to KTVU? IDK – we never heard about the details of that fiasco, die we?

Fresh from the Feds:

NTSB releases agenda and media logistics for Investigative Hearing on Asiana Flight 214

December 5

The National Transportation Safety Board today released the agenda for the two-day investigative hearing on the ongoing investigation into the July 6 crash landing of Asiana Airlines flight 214.

The hearing will be held on December 10th & 11th at the NTSB’s Board Room and Conference Center at 429 L’Enfant Plaza SW in Washington D.C. and begins at 9:00 a.m. on the first day and 8:30 a.m. on the second day.

Hearing witnesses, including representatives of the Federal Aviation Administration, Boeing, Asiana Airlines, Korean Office of Civil Aviation, and International Federation of Air Line Pilot’s Associations,Commercial Air Safety Team will testify and answer questions from NTSB Board members, technical staff, and parties about flight deck design concepts and characteristics, pilot training on automated systems and visual approach procedures, pilot awareness in highly automated aircraft, emergency response, and cabin safety. The full agenda, including a list of witnesses is available at http://www.ntsb.gov/news/events/2013/asiana214_hearing/agenda.html.

Investigative exhibits for the hearing will be placed in the electronic docket at the start of the hearing and will be available athttp://www.ntsb.gov/news/events/2013/asiana214_hearing/index.html once the hearing begins.

NTSB Chairman Deborah A.P. Hersman will be available to answer questions from the media at the conclusion of each day. Additional details about those availabilities will be announced at a later date.

Television coverage of the proceedings will be by network pool. Escorted cutaway for video media will be permitted for brief periods throughout the hearing. Still photographers will be permitted in the seating area of the Board Room and by escort to areas in front of the witness panels.

Because of construction at and around L’Enfant Plaza, satellite and other media trucks will have to obtain credentials for parking and running cable through the construction zone. To expedite this process, media must RSVP to keith.holloway@ntsb.gov by December 9. Access to the Board Room is available beginning at 7:30 a.m.

A media room is also available with tables, chairs and an audio mult box with interpretations of the proceedings into English, Mandarin and Korean. Audio headsets will be provided. Generally-accepted media credentials will be required for access to the media room. In addition, a fully equipped overflow room has been established and will serve as a storage area for video equipment during the hearing.

Seating for the general public in the Board Room is on a first-come, first-served basis. Given the international makeup of those onboard Asiana flight 214, the hearing will be webcast live in English, Mandarin and Korean. Access to the webcast can be found at www.ntsb.gov.

There will be standard federal security procedures for entry into the Board Room and Conference Center. All persons entering the facility will need to show a photo ID and their possessions will be subject to inspection. Persons leaving the facility will have to pass through screening again to gain re-entry.

Directions to the Board Room are available at www.ntsb.gov/about/conference_center.html.

Office of Public Affairs
490 L’Enfant Plaza, SW
Washington, DC 20594
Keith Holloway
(202) 557-1350
keith.holloway@ntsb.gov

Bay Area Bike Share Declared a Huge Success by … Bay Area Bike Share

Tuesday, December 3rd, 2013

Let’s see here:

“wildly popular”

“Maddox took the opportunity to trumpet the program’s successes”

“Bike Share is popular”

But this assumes that the program costs nothing, right?

And this assumes the program is well-run, right? Is it? IDK

What I do know is that for the amount of money we’re talking about here, we could buy over 100,000 bikes and not just rent them out but simply GIVE THEM AWAY.

We’re talking about bikes that would be much lighter and have many more gears.

(I realize that giving away bikes isn’t what BABS is about, but that’s a comparison.)

What BABS is is a jobs program, one that pays workers the whopping total of $13.50 per hour.

That’s one of my beefs.

Here’s another – what does this even mean?

“In order for the program to ‘break even’ operationally, Maddox said, the program would need to expand to 2,500-3,000 bikes in total inside of San Francisco.”

You know, I went to the colledge, but I can’t for the life of me understand what “break even” means in this context.

Anywho, here’s the latest. But please remember, that the people behind this bike share program have never ever ever violated any labor laws and they’re, well, they’re the most perfect non-rent seekers ever to cut a deal with SFGov, so don’t dare to ask any questions about their Wonderful One-Hoss Shay:

“Bay Area Bike Share off to a strong start

Pilot Program prepares for full expansion in 2014

SAN FRANCISCO, Dec. 3, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — With over 178,000 miles traveled since the launch of Bay Area Bike Share, a distance that would allow a bicyclist to circle the Earth more than seven times, ridership in the popular regional bicycle sharing program continues to grow.

(Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20131203/SF26953-INFO)

The three-month-old system has now racked up more than 80,000 rides with over 3,200 annual members and more than 10,000 casual members since the program began on August 29.  More area residents and visitors continue to sign up every day, increasing momentum for the program.

“The Bay Area Bike Share program is transforming the way people travel in our region,” said Jack Broadbent, executive officer of the Air District.  ”These bicycles offer an important connection for that last mile of transportation between public transit and final destinations.  The success of this program will result in long-term health and quality-of-life benefits for our region.”

The bike sharing system launched this summer with 700 mint green colored bicycles, available 24 hours a day, seven days a week at 70 stations in five cities along the Caltrain commuter rail corridor — San Francisco, Redwood City, Palo Alto, Mountain View and San Jose.  A full expansion of the pilot system in 2014 will boost those numbers to 1,000 bicycles at 100 stations.  Bay Area Bike Share is the first bike share system in the country to launch as a regionally integrated system serving cities spread out over 50 miles.

Offered as a “first and last mile solution,” as well as a stand-alone transportation option, the aim of the pilot program is to test the effectiveness of bike sharing in the region.  The program encourages Bay Area residents and visitors alike to make short trips by bike, both in conjunction with public transit and for non-transit linked trips, resulting in reduced air pollution in and around the areas served.

Significant emission reductions from the transportation sector will help protect public health and ensure the Bay Area meets state and national air quality standards while reducing greenhouse gases.

Annual Memberships: Bay Area Bike Share offers two types of annual memberships. The Pacesetter Membership ($88), includes unlimited rides up to 30 minutes each. The Frontrunner Membership ($103), also includes a t-shirt and two 24-hour memberships. For more information, please visit bayareabikeshare.com/membership.

Corporate Partnerships: Bay Area Bike Share has just launched a corporate membership program, where businesses and organizations of all sizes can offer discounted and subsidized annual memberships to employees. There are five levels of partnership that are based on company size, number of participating employees and company contribution. For more information, please visit bayareabikeshare.com.

The cost of the full pilot totals $11.2 million, and is funded using Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality ($7.1 million), Transportation Fund for Clean Air ($2.8 million) and other local funds ($1.3 million). The program is managed by the Air District in partnership with the Metropolitan Transportation Commission and local partners.

In addition to the Air District and MTC, the pilot project is a partnership among local government agencies including the City and County of San Francisco, SamTrans, Caltrain, San Mateo County Transportation Authority, the County of San Mateo, the City of Redwood City and the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority.

Bay Area residents and visitors can learn more about the bike share system at:
      –       www.bayareabikeshare.com
      –       www.facebook.com/bayareabikeshare
      –       www.twitter.com/sfbaybikeshare

The Bay Area Air Quality Management District is the regional agency responsible for protecting air quality in the nine-county Bay Area. For more information, visit www.baaqmd.gov.

SOURCE  The Bay Area Air Quality Management District

Photo:http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20131203/SF26953-INFO
http://photoarchive.ap.org/
The Bay Area Air Quality Management District

CONTACT: Tom Flannigan, 415.749.4948

Web Site: http://bayareabikeshare.com

Let’s review:

I own more bikes than you do.

I have more miles

Nike Women’s Marathon Media Van #2 Going Waaaaaay Too Fast for the Narrow Streets and Lanes of the Western Addition

Tuesday, October 22nd, 2013

Uh, it’s just the 2013 Nike Half-Marathon, it’s not Armageddon, or even Deep Impact. Where’s the fire, minivan lady? I mean, nobody really cares about the Nike (excepting for the concomitant silver bling from Tiffany’s that Finishers so covet), but people will care if you run over a ped, right?

Also, Nevada plates?

Click to expand

Now, Oregon plates, you know, from California’s Other Deadbeat Neighbor, from Nike’s Home State, well, I’d almost go for that.

In conclusion, I cry foul.

Assignment Desk for Monday Morning, September 23rd, 2013 – Octavia Strike, Emirates Air, Bicycle Stings…

Monday, September 23rd, 2013

1. Hey, is a there a cracking large picket line* of construction workers at San Francisco’s failed Octavia “Boulevard” and Haight Street going on these days? Hell yes! Does it get started early in the AM? Apparently. Does it go 24-7? IDK. Does it sometime go around the block where a new building is going in?? Yes, with some people visible at Octavia and Market. This one writes itself, people!

2. Is there an empty jumbo jet from Emirates Airline just sitting around at SFO, just waiting to take Emirates Team New Zealand back Down Under except, uh oh, the team just can’t get its ninth victory in the America’s Cup Finals? Is it bad juju to plan on winning like this? (Some on the Team think so.) Or is it good planning? IDK. Anyway, I’d be looking for a big old honking Airbus A380 or a late-model Boeing 777. I mean, Emirates flies out of SFO all the time (they want to be the “hub for the world” and they just might make it someday) but they don’t have scheduled flights to NZ, that’s for sure. (Perhaps they always have a plane available for standby IDK)

3. The media covering the 34th America’s Cup boat race had no freaking idea that this debacle could go on for so long so they’ve lost their hotel reservations to the hard-charging Oracle OpenWorld convention? Isn’t it ironic, dontcha think? How is the AC having an economic impact if the town is full? What about the poor kiwi fans? Are they sleeping on couches these days? What about their plane tickets home?

4. The penalty for going outside of the America’s Cup rubric (basically meaning going straight to the New York Supreme Court, which confusingly is not the highest in that state) is that you lose the Cup. Well, if Larry Ellison has already lost the Auld Mug, say by next week, say by a very narrow margin, well then Katie bar the door. Remember the cheating penalty came from the International Jury that was set up by one LE and it was meant to punish not just the cheating but the environment allowed by management that is associated with the actions of all those people who were involved. LE has been involved in four ACs and he’s lost two of them so far. The time that he won he won in court, oh well. Oh and is there some international tax situation going on with Team NZ? Something to do with where certain people earn their pay. Maybe the International Jury will hear about this before this Cup ends? Just a rumour, Love.

5. Folsom Street inbound at 6th has been “improved” by SFGov in the recent past? Compare it with Folsom at 5th and Folsom at Fourth. I believe the yellow zebra stripes are au currant these days so that’s a clue. Now that right-turning truck was supposed to have pulled into the right lane, but is it a full lane? No it’s not. It’s been narrowed by the pedestrian bulb-out on the south side of the intersection, the place where that cyclist recently died in a collision. Did the bulb-out contribute to that death? Are bulb-outs bad for cyclists? Are they good for peds? Anyway, we don’t hear about similar deaths at old-school, unimproved 5th and Folsom…

6. The bicycle “sting” operations of citing cyclists for using the SFBC-approved Wiggle Route in the Lower Haight are back, baby. I don’t know if it’s every day that they do this, but last week two motorcycle cops had field days (as in more than one day, like on 9-17 and 9-20 for sure). Officer R. Scott parks his motorcycle and then points to all those people coming up from Duboce Park “1,2,3,4,5,6,” he says. Then everybody has to wait until he processes all the tickets for blowing the stop sign at Waller and Steiner, for instance. He says he’d rather be out answering the calls he gets on his radio, like an alleged hammer attack. Then he’ll talk about his Porsche. He’s extremely chill. So The CW Nevius and Stanley Roberts have been out there the past year, but the past week, well it’s been pretty intense, a renewed effort. I thought that the SFPD was giving up on this.

Ready steady go!

* What in the Hell is this, from

Historic Context Statement
Market and Octavia Neighborhood Plan Area
San Francisco, California?

http://www.sf-planning.org/Modules/ShowDocument.aspx?documentid=4688

Our Planning Department planned Octavia for picket lines???

“Picket lines, for instance, are a spatial expression of a labor grievance.”

WTF is this?

Hey, why not plan for the 24-7 traffic jam that’s there now? Why not plan for the traffic deaths _you_ caused, Planning Dept? Why not cancel left turns on Market and Octavia, you know to increase transit speed at the expense of the wealthy car drivers who live in Hayes Valley?

Anyway, have at it:

“Since labor conflict, whether internal or external, is often expressed in spatial terms, the built
environment of the workplace must be seen as an integral factor in the understanding of labor
disputes. Picket lines, for instance, are a spatial expression of a labor grievance. The questions of
precisely where picketers may or may not stand, whether they may block an entrance, how closely
they can approach ongoing work activities, and who may cross the line, are fundamental in the
conduct and resolution of a dispute. Contestation of these issues can lead to physical confrontations
or criminal penalties, and may determine the outcome of the conflict.
The relatively small scale of the built environment in the Industrial Employment Study Area had
advantages for strike activities. Picketers could assemble on public sidewalks immediately adjacent to
the business being struck, rather than being kept at a distance by fences or buffer zones on company
property. Likewise, the limited number of entrances to most of the buildings made it easier for
strikers to monitor access and inform visitors that the business was being struck. More generally, the
absence of street setbacks and the open design of the buildings allowed for easy surveillance of the
workplace. With the vehicular doors open, an observer could survey the entire shop in many of these
buildings. This facilitated monitoring who was working and what work was being done—valuable
information for union organizing or the conduct of a strike, as well as for individuals seeking work.
175 The term “open shop” refers to a situation where union membership is not a requirement for employment. In practice,
it generally describes conditions in which union membership actually disqualifies one for employment.
176 The term CIO originally stood for the Committee on Industrial Organization, a subgroup within the AFL. In 1937, the
group was expelled from the AFL. From that time until the two merged in 1955, CIO stood for Congress of Industrial
Unions. Since the merger, the resulting organization is known as the AFL/CIO.
177 The ACWA and ILGWU belonged to the “social unionism” wing of the CIO. Within th

Ashton Kutcher and Jay-Z want to Disrupt Civil Aviation by Backing “BlackJet” – It’s “Uber for Private Jets!”

Friday, July 12th, 2013

Here’s the news:

“A new chapter in the private jet market has opened in LA. BlackJet now allows its members to step into the lap of luxury at the cost of a business class seat on a commercial airline. The company is backed by tech moguls and Hollywood A-Listers Ashton Kutcher and Jay-Z. Each recognized that BlackJet’s technology will allow the top 15% of earners to step into a private jet as opposed to the top 1%. Instead of waiting in security lines and sitting in terminals, members are greeted by a red carpet, park next to their jet, and fall into an oversized captain’s chair.”

Check it:


Again, check it:

“Blackjet customers must be members of the service and pay an annual membership fee, currently set at $2500. The company said its target market is  business executives making more than $200,000 per year who already fly on private jets and would like to spend less money, as well as people who currently fly on commercial airlines but are looking for more of a premium service.”

Coverage:

News from SEIU 1021 About the BART and City of Oakland Strike of July 1, 2013 – “Expected to Stall Bay Area Today”

Monday, July 1st, 2013

“***MEDIA ADVISORY FOR MONDAY, JULY 1, 2013***

CONTACT:  Anna Bakalis, SEIU 1021 (510) 387-5341 for City of OaklandCecille Isidro, SEIU 1021, (510) 289-8767 for BART in OaklandCarlos Rivera, SEIU 1021, (415) 260-7134 for BART in San Francisco

    SEIU 1021 Strike Expected to Stall Bay Area Today

 – More than 5,000 City of Oakland and BART Employees are expected to strike throughout the day. Workers will set up picket lines at 1 Frank Ogawa Plaza in front of Oakland City Hall at 7 AM.

WHO:            City of Oakland and BART workers officially go on strike, starting midnight July 1. Community supporters, elected officials and labor allies, join workers at the picket lines.

WHAT:            Workers, represented by SEIU Local 1021, are protesting unfair labor practices and demand greater investment in critical public services. The separate contracts for the City of Oakland and BART expired at midnight, June 30.

A press tent on Frank Ogawa Plaza with electricity and WiFi will be set up for media, starting at 7 AM. 

WHAT:            Mass Strike Begins

WHEN:            7 AM Monday, July 1

WHERE:          Oakland City Hall, 1 Frank Ogawa Plaza

VISUALS:         Workers picketing, chanting in front of City Hall, near the 12th St BART station

Interviews with workers for the City of Oakland and BART are available at Frank Ogawa Plaza all day.

The following are key press conferences throughout the day in Oakland and SF:

4:30 AM – Civic Center BART Station-UN Plaza in San Francisco

7 AM– Frank Ogawa Plaza in Oakland

12 Noon – Frank Ogawa Plaza in Oakland/Community and Labor Solidarity Rally

5 PM – Civic Center BART Station-UN Plaza in San Francisco

7:30 PM – Frank Ogawa Plaza in Oakland. Press announcement regarding strike 

FOR ONGOING AND UPDATED STRIKE INFORMATION, GO TO WWW.SEIU1021.ORG

CONCLUSION: The Gannett Co Inc’s THE BOLD ITALIC Website is From and For People Who Don’t Live in San Francisco

Thursday, May 16th, 2013

[UPDATE: Ah, well, TBI reacts by fixing the MACALLISTER typo, but by not fixing the map. You see, Gough doesn't dead end here and Laguna doesn't dead end here neither. The Bold Italic is written like it's produced by minimum security prisoners in upstate New York making 11 cents per hour, IMO.]

Here you go, Where Are The Cheaper Rents in SF?”

Gannett Co. Inc’s money-losing (millions and millions so far) San Francisco media experiment is, once again, taking on an issue of concern to newcomers:

Where Should I Live And What Does Where I Live Say About Me?

Except this time it’s a dump from TBI “partner” Zumper, whatever the Hell that is.

So all there’s for the low level TBI people to do is make the accompanying graphics to break up the grafs.

Oh, here we go:

So, you know why the rents are cheaper here generally, GANNETCOINCTHEBOLDITALICZUMPER? It’s because of all the federally-subsidized housing projects. 

Oh, but you knew that and you showed that you knew that. So that’s good, I guess.

But actually, the area you’re showing is mostly PJ’s and concomitant parking lots? So the small number of readers you have won’t be able to actually move in, right? I can think of just one small area, in the upper right, where your data points come from. Is that what you’re talking about, TBIZumper?

Anyway, that’s why streets like Buchanan and Octavia dead end here, because of the Redevelopment, right?

Except Laguna doesn’t dead end, it does go through, right? Do you know that, TBI? The map says that you don’t know that. (And a good thing that Laguna doesn’t dead end, else the climate in this area would be even more muggy, if you know what I mean.)

And how many people at TBI looked at “MACALLISTER” and said, “Looks good to me, no problems here?”

But check it, the typos aren’t the problem, they are just the symptom of your problem.

From TBI:

“…here in San Francisco, we’re striving to create our own culturally significant publication that captures the city in such a thoughtful way…”

So, TBI, do you really think you’re a culturally significant publication? Do you really think you’re capturing the city in a thoughtful way?

I don’t.

So, TBI, do you really think you’re:

“a San Francisco-based website building a cultural narrative of the city for both locals and tourists?”

Well, I can see that you’re aimed at tourists but I don’t know about cultural narratives and whatnot.

All right, enjoy your high burn rate.

And enjoy your unsustainable clubhouse on Page while you slap a few graphics onto your partners’ pretty-much-worthless content.

And enjoy your self-indulgent field trips that really really super serve your readers.

END OF LINE.

SURPRISE: San Francisco Chronicle Writer CW Nevius Comes Out AGAINST the Central Subway – Here’s What He Said

Tuesday, April 16th, 2013

All right, first of all, if you want CW Nevius to Block you from his Twitter feed, start up a crappy WordPress blog and call him one of the following:

“SHARP-AS-A-MARBLE, EX-JOCK, EVERYMAN NEWS COLUMNIST/QUASI SPORTSWRITER” or a

“BROWN-NOSING, OBSEQUIOUS KISS-ASS LICKSPITTLE TOADIE”

That’s what did it, one or the other, I figure.

So now I’m banned, for life, from the Twitterings of the The Neve.

Oh well.

Anyway, here’s what the Nevinator has to say today about the Central Subway boondoggle.

See? It doesn’t seem that the Nevemeister opposes the wasteful Subway to Nowhere.

But he does! Check it:

“Nevius: Chinatown subway plan makes me wince”

“There’s really only one question to ask about the proposal to bore a light-rail subway deep under the heart of downtown San Francisco. You’re kidding, right?

“Just the initial math makes your head hurt. Basically it works out to somewhere between $1.22 billion and $1.4 billion for an underground railway that runs for less than two miles and has only three stops. That’s not a transit system, it’s a model railroad.

“Throw in a few of the inevitable cost overruns and this could work out to a billion dollars a mile.”

“No matter. This is the kind of big, splashy project that city officials love to put their name on.”

“Basically, the argument seems to boil down to this - we’ve got the money (as if federal tax dollars grow on trees), the Chinatown community is behind it, why not build it? Oh, let me count some of the reasons.”

“But, critics say, a stop on Market beneath which BART and other Muni lines already run might have made this whole thing an easier sell. That would have created an opportunity for a single station where riders could make connections between regional and local trains, almost like Grand Central Terminal in New York. Instead, riders will have to walk all the way up to Union Square.”

“Oh, and did I mention that in order to get under the BART tube, the subway station at Union Square will have to be at least 95 feet below the surface. That’s nine stories.”

“What is it about that image of deep, underground dirt-munching machines in earthquake country that makes me wince?”

Of course that was from a half-decade back, but it shows how he actually felt about this boondoggly boondoggle, about Big Dig West.

I mean, the Central Subway proposal hasn’t gotten better the past five years, has it? Five years ago, the promise was that it would “make money” for MUNI, that it would subsidize other parts of the system by generating a surplus. But now we know that it will burden the SFMTA and the current projections for the number of riders per day is down dramatically from what people were promising back then.

So what’s a matter Neve? Why don’t you write things like this anymore? Cat got your tongue?

Pak got your tongue?

The Old Nevius wasn’t afraid to be labeled a racist who’s against “transit justice.”

The Old Nevius wasn’t so monomaniacally dedicated to write source greasers every chance he got. 

Oh well.

Do You Like Chipotle? Well Then Join the “Grass Roots Effort” to get Permiso de Uso Condicional for Church and Market

Friday, February 8th, 2013

(Boy I’ll tell you, if I were blogger Eve Batey and I was on the receiving end of a press release from an area business, what I would do is criticize other bloggers for giving free publicity for said business. Then I’d say that it would be better to contact said business, you know, to hit them up for an advertising deal. Then word would get out about that. Then I’d get criticized by members of the local professional media – they’d label such behavior ”unethical” or something. Then I’d call out said members of the local professional media for being “haters.” Then, I’d have more my popular friends also call said members of the local professional media “haters.” If I were blogger Eve Batey.)

And best of all, the new Chipotle’s “Mexican” Grill at 2100 Market will have a MURAL DE ART PUBLICO.

See?

Click to expand

(What’s next, a Chipotle at 20th and Mission? On top of the Mission Dolores Cemetery? At the northeast corner of Dolores Park?)

I’ll tell you, the proper way to get a conditional use permit is to write a check for $15,000 made out to Alex Tourk, you know, to get the ball rolling. Then he’ll tell you what the add-ons will cost you. (You’re going to get a few add-ons, you know, like for pizza night at City Hall.) And then, before you know it, in a matter of days, weeks , months, or years, you’ll get your CUP and then open for bidness.

Hooray!

(Or you can go cheap route by trying to tap your fan base on the Facebook, either way.)

Impresionante!

Here’s your grass roots petition from Chipotle Mexican Grill (NYSECMG, in case you want to invest some of your hard-earned pesos – ask your broker!).

“Castro/Upper Market Chipotle

Dear San Francisco Planning Commission,

I support bringing a new Chipotle Mexican Grill to 2100 Market Street, the former location of Home Restaurant. This property has been vacant for over a year and has become an eyesore in our community.

Chipotle plans to do a complete façade remodel including the addition of an outdoor patio. The design, which includes a public art component, would be unique to our neighborhood and created with input from the community.

I also support Chipotle’s commitment to finding the very best ingredients, partnering with suppliers that raise their livestock humanely and farmers that respect the environment. These practices are consistent with San Francisco’s values.

Please vote in favor of revitalizing this corner with a new Chipotle Mexican Grill.

View Signatures without signing

TTFN. But first  check the Facebook of this international S&P 500 corporation:

Hello SF friends! We request your assistance with a petition - http://Chipotle.epetitions.net/ - to help us build a restaurant at 2100 Market Street in the Castro.

Or you can write us at CastroRestaurant@chipotle.com

The petition results and emails will be sent to planning commissioners in support of our effort to secure a conditional use permit to build our restaurant. Thank you for your time and effort! – Joe

  • Vincent Tamariz: There are three small business mexican restaurants (and good ones!) all within blocks of this spot. Not a fan of sub-urbanization and losing our character. It offers no “new or needed” service.