Posts Tagged ‘medical center’

This is the White 2009 Hyundai Elantra Involved in This Morning’s Fatal Collision on Masonic near Turk

Friday, May 6th, 2011

The San Francisco Chronicle’s Henry K. Lee has the early details and Terry McSweeny of KGO-TV has a video report.

This is the lane that goes through St. Mary’s between Stanyan and Shrader:

Click to expand

The owner of the white Hyundai (CA 6HOT660) resides in the Chinatown / Nob Hill area, one might assume.

And here’s one of the cars that driver Jose Jimenez hit on Clayton near Fell Street when he was traveling from the hit and run scene to St. Mary’s. This two-ton minivan was pushed a foot or two so the impact speed must have been fairly high:

They Rank Bay Area Hospitals, Don’t They? Yes, U.S. News Does That Now – UCSF Tops the List for 2011

Thursday, March 31st, 2011

Well here’s the debut list from U.S. News (and World Report):

Of all 44 hospitals in the San Francisco, California metropolitan area, the 14 listed below are the top-ranking. This metro area, also called the Bay Area, includes Oakland and Fremont.

1. UCSF Medical Center — San Francisco, CA
2. John Muir Medical Center — Walnut Creek, CA
3. California Pacific Medical Center — San Francisco, CA
4. John Muir Medical Center — Concord, CA
5. Alta Bates Summit Medical Center — Berkeley, CA
5. Seton Medical Center — Daly City, CA
7. Kaiser Foundation Hospital — Antioch, CA
7. Kaiser Foundation Hospital — Walnut Creek, CA
7. Kaiser Foundation Hospital — Oakland, CA
7. Kaiser Permanente San Francisco — San Francisco, CA
7. Mills-Peninsula Health Services — Burlingame, CA
7. San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center — San Francisco, CA
7. Sequoia Hospital — Redwood City, CA
7. Washington Hospital — Fremont, CA

Click on over for all the deets. They look like this:

Click to expand

And UCSF Benioff Children”s Hospital is tops in its field in the Bay Area.

This whole thing is a national deal with many more urban areas covered, including:

AtlantaBaltimoreBostonChicagoCincinnati,

DallasDenver,DetroitHoustonLosAngeles,

MiamiMinneapolisNewYorkPhiladelphia,

PhoenixPittsburghRiversideSan Diego,

SeattleSt. LouisTampaWashington DC

And you people down in San Joser haven’t been left out – you all have your own list. It’s topped by Stanford Hospital, Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, and the Regional Medical Center of San Jose. South Bay in the hiz-ouse.

Anyway, read what UCSF has to say about all this, after the jump

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UC Regents Approve UCSF Mission Bay Med Center – Helipad-Equipped Hospital Coming in 2014

Friday, September 17th, 2010

Oh it’s on. The fundraising campaign to get the Medical Center at Mission Bay off the ground is going well enough, so the University of California Board of Regents just gave the go-ahead for the project. The next step will be the groundbreaking ceremony. 

(And oh, what’s the LEED rating? It’s Gold, baby. And oh, we’ve got choppers - a helipad is baked into the cake. Moving on…)

Putting cancer /women’s  / children’s medicine in Mission Bay will free-up UCSF Medical Center at Parnassus Heights to do other things. It will:

“…transition into focusing on high-end adult surgical and medical services, including emergency medicine.”

(So you Inner Sunset / Cole Valley NIMBYs now have been warned. Let’s hope the increase in wailing sirens won’t disturb your lives too much…) 

Anyway, turn up your speakers waaaaay loud (you’ll soon discover why) to see this short video from UCSF Chancellor Susan Desmond-Hellmann and UCSF Medical Center CEO Mark Laret, if you want. 

And here’s the Mission Bay renderporn. Radar O’Reilly can already hear the choppers: 

 

Click to expand 

Here’s what the 183-bed UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital might look like. For the record, the naming rights went for $100,000,000: 

 

You can see it on the right here: 

 

Bon Courage, UCSF! 

All the deets: 

The University of California Board of Regents today unanimously approved funding plans for the new UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay. The board’s action is the final endorsement for the project, clearing the way for UCSF to break ground on a world-class hospital complex for children, women and cancer patients in the Mission Bay neighborhood, south of downtown San Francisco.  

“The Regents’ approval is a major milestone for UCSF and for our family of supporters throughout the community,” said UCSF Chancellor Susan Desmond-Hellmann. “It is hard to overstate the importance of the new medical center at Mission Bay, which will reinforce UCSF and the entire Bay Area as a hub of innovation, biotechnology and premier health care.”  

After nearly a decade of planning, site preparations are underway on the 14.5-acre parcel of land. Construction of the 878,000-gross-square-foot hospital complex will begin on schedule in December 2010, shortly after required state permits are expected to be issued. Upon completion in 2014, the 289-bed facility will set a new standard for patient- and family-centered health care, safety, sustainability and translational medicine.  

“Ten years ago, the UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay was a dream, but we are now ready to break ground and bring this vision to reality,” said Mark R. Laret, CEO of UCSF Medical Center and UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital. “The greatest legacy of the Regents’ decision to approve this new medical center will be the thousands of patient lives that are saved or improved because of the cutting-edge medical care that will be provided in these facilities.”  

Ever more deets, after the jump 

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UCSF Medical Center Ranked, Once Again, as a Top Ten Hospital by U.S. News & World Report

Thursday, July 15th, 2010

Here’s the latest from the Hospital on the Hill, UCSF Medical Center. Per U.S. Snooze and World Distort, here’s how America’s hospitals stack up as of 2010-2011:

1.Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore
2.Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.
3.Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
4.Cleveland Clinic
5.Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles
6.New York-Presbyterian University Hospital of Columbia and Cornell
7.UCSF Medical Center, San Francisco
8.Barnes-Jewish Hospital/Washington University, St. Louis, Mo.
9.Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
10.Duke University Medical Center, Durham, N.C.
11.Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston
12.University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle
13.UPMC-University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
14.University of Michigan Hospitals and Health Centers, Ann Arbor

That’s not half bad, huh? Over the past century, UCSF has gotten better and better and our transit system has gotten worse and worse, it would appear. That’s not a bad trade-off.

Back in the day, it’s the ur-N Judah passing by UCSF:

Oh well.

Congratulations, people of UCSF!

All the deets:

UCSF Medical Center Named a Top 10 Hospital for 10th Consecutive Year

July 15, 2010
News Office: Karin Rush-Monroe

UCSF Medical Center ranks among the nation’s top 10 premier hospitals for the 10th consecutive year and is the best in Northern California, according to the 2010-11 America’s Best Hospitals survey conducted by U.S. News & World Report.

UCSF was named the seventh best hospital in the country, earning a spot on the survey’s “honor roll.” Of the 4,852 medical centers evaluated by U.S. News this year, only 14 earned honor roll status, demonstrating excellence and breadth of expertise by ranking at or near the top in at least six specialties.

The U.S. News score summarizes overall quality of inpatient care including balance of nurses to patients, mortality, patient safety, reputation, procedure volume, and care-related measures such as technology and patient services.

Mark R. Laret, CEO of UCSF Medical Center, said, “It is gratifying that the breadth of our expertise — from cancer to neurosurgery, from ophthalmology to gynecology — is ranked among the very best in the nation. I want to commend all the UCSF clinicians, faculty and staff, in addition to our physician partners in the community, who continually strive to improve the delivery of our care.”

Ever more deets, after the jump

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Skype Video and Voice Calling Program Comes to UCSF Med Center and Children’s Hospital

Wednesday, April 28th, 2010

The Future Is Now – virtual visits have come to UCSF. So now you can talk to your friend without having to worry about spreading the H1N1 flu or whatever else comes down the pike. Read all about it: 

UCSF Children’s Hospital and UCSF Medical Center have partnered with Skype to help connect hospital inpatients with family members and friends who are unable to visit in person. The innovative new collaboration is the first such partnershipbetween Skype and a hospital.

The Skype video and voice calling programis now available to all inpatients at the UCSF hospitals. Using designated laptop computers with Skype software delivered to the bedside, patients can have virtual visits with family and friends around the globe on a secure network. According to Lila Param, director of pediatric services at UCSF Children’s Hospital, Skype supports the healing process by overcoming geographical boundaries that can lead to a sense of isolation among patients.”

All the deets, after the jump

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As H1N1 Fears Subside, UCSF Hospitals are Once Again Open to Visiting Children

Wednesday, March 10th, 2010

Those kids crowding Moffitt Cafe at UCSF Medical Center / Children’s Hospital will now have Run of the House, more or less, ’cause the restrictions against child visitors just got eliminated. So, as of yesterday, the place is, once again, totally wide open, more or less, to visitors aged 15 and less. 

Not sure what other local hospitals are thinking these days, but UCSF says that Influenza activity has decreased considerably lately. Read all about it, below.

Godzilla menaces this huge architect’s model of UCSF under a glass box, so he’s always safe from H1N1. But runaway tow trucks, well, that’s a different story:

Moffitt Cafe is now released from its ragamuffin daycare role so it can return to being a haven for law students, a place of escape where legal scholars are free to hit on medical and pharmacological students and/or professionals in a target-rich environment. (At least that’s how the cafeteria was used back in the 90′s.)

Forthwith, the News of the Day:

UCSF Lifts Hospital Visitor Policy Restricting Children

March 09, 2010

UCSF Medical Center and UCSF Children’s Hospital are lifting their visitor age restriction, which prohibited visitors younger than 16 years old. The visitor policy is being lifted effective March 9, 2010.

Dr. Joshua Adler, chief medical officer at UCSF, said he believes the policy, implemented in November, and other strategies, such as vaccination of UCSF personnel, helped reduce the risk of hospital-acquired influenza.

Influenza activity has decreased considerably so that risk is now quite low, Adler said. In the hospital units where age restrictions are not usually in place, children now may visit. Unit-specific age restrictions, such as those in the intensive care units, may remain in effect, according to unit-based policy.

A requirement, however, remains in effect until March 31 that health care workers, who have not been vaccinated against both H1N1 and seasonal influenza, must wear a surgical mask while in patient care areas.

Adler thanked employees for their diligent infection control measures during the flu season. Record numbers of UCSF employees, faculty, residents, and students received flu vaccines this year, he said.

Consumer Reports Disses UCSF Medical Center Over High Central Catheter Infection Rate

Tuesday, February 2nd, 2010

All right, Consumer Reports has a few notes about San Francisco hospitals in another Missive from Yonkers this AM. Actually, the people at CR sound a little hacked off, and for a couple of reasons.

Item One: They’re using a hospital’s ICU Central Line Associated Bloodstream Infection Rate as a yardstick of performance. Why? Why not. Here’s how CR feels:

“The procedures needed to eliminate ICU infections are simple, low-tech, and inexpensive, requiring a change of mindset and culture. All ICUs should be able to dramatically reduce if not eliminate these infections.”

O.K., so who has a central line infection rate of zero, who’s perfect?

Saint Luke’s Hospital

Saint Francis Memorial Hospital

Saint Mary’s Medical Center

After all those Saints go marching in, which San Francisco hospitals are doing less-than-perfect but better than average?

California Pacific Medical Center-Pacific Campus

Kaiser Foundation Hospital- San Francisco

But who’s left, who in the 415 is ”on the other end of the spectrum” with a reported infection rate that’s 80 percent worse than the national average when compared with similar ICUs?

UCSF Medical Center

Ouch.

Take a look for yourself on this almost-legible chart. Goran nasai, Gentle Reader - click to expand:

Do you buy all that? Well, for one, Steven E.F. Brown does, over at the San Francisco Business Times.

But what’s this - how about a little feedback from a California-licensed physician? Comes now Dr. Steven Suydam, who took a look at CR’s press release today and reacted thusly:

“Central line infections occur in every hospital, but some institutions, especially public academic institutions are simply more forthright about reporting them, and are more likely to have candid effective quality assurance programs in place, than private, for-profit institutions. In addition, hospitals have the latitude to classify a bloodstream infection as coming from an alternate source, if one is available, thereby avoiding the dreaded “CLABI” label. The alternative explanation, that UCSF physicians place central lines under less sterile conditions than private hospitals and maintain such lines with less care is simply nonsense.” 

O.K. then. But as always, You Make The Call. It certainly would be interesting to hear about what UCSF thinks of all this. Moving on… 

Widening our purview to the whole bay area gets us this:

“In the larger Bay Area, where Consumer Reports Health rated 29 hospitals, Consumer Reports found extreme variation between hospitals, even hospitals run by the same health care system.  For example, Kaiser Foundation Hospitals in Hayward, Santa Rosa, Vallejo, and South San Francisco reported zero central line infections, while Kaiser Foundation Hospital in San Jose had an infection rate that was 14 percent worse than the national average and the Kaiser Foundation Hospital in San Francisco reported a rate that’s 40 percent better than average.”

Item Two: CR doesn’t like getting blown off when it goes nosing around for data. So it has lots of criticism for the way California as a state is handling reporting of statistics. The California Department of Health should have data for us by January 1, 2011, but CR isn’t optimistic about this deadline getting met.

Anyway, who’s on the Naughty List (CR’s Health Ratings Center’s Director is Dr. Santa, srlsy) with naught to report?

San Francisco General Hospital Medical Center

O.K. then.

What’s it all mean? No se, mi amigo/a. One thing for certain though, this news release means that Consumer Reports Health wants your money. Sign up for a free 30-day trial that you’ll soon forget about until you get your credit card statement in two or three months – I don’t care what you do with your money. (Frankly, I object to the whole Consumer Reports-is-my-Bible mentality that certain people have. IMO, CR is just another data point in the constellation of information out there.)

Anyway, read the whole thing for yourself, after the jump.

Stay healthy.  (more…)

Million Dollar Payday for San Mateo County Hospital Whistleblower

Thursday, March 12th, 2009

The Stop Snitching movement took a blow with news today of a million dollar payday to Ronald M. Davis, a former employee of San Mateo County. Seems there might have been some irregularities with the way San Mateo Medical Center, the county’s troubled “public safety net” hospital, got dinero from the federales’  Medicare and Medicaid programs:

“The lawsuit was filed under the qui tam or whistleblower provisions of the False Claims Act, which permit private individuals called “relators” to bring lawsuits on behalf of the United States and receive a portion of the proceeds of a settlement or judgment awarded against a defendant. The relator in this action will receive $1,020,000 as his statutory share of the proceeds of this settlement.”

The million clams is the 15% statutory minimum of what the Feds are going to get back. Ka ching!

via solidstate

For shame SMMC, for shame.

Let’s get the Feds’ side of the story and then see them pat themselves on the back:

San Mateo County, California, to Pay U.S. $6.8 Million to Resolve False Claims Allegations

Settlement Resolves Allegations Against San Mateo County Medical Center

WASHINGTON, March 12 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — San Mateo County, Calif., has agreed to pay the United States $6.8 million to resolve allegations that the San Mateo Medical Center (SMMC) submitted false claims to the United States in connection with payments from the Medicare and Medicaid programs, the Justice Department announced today.

The government alleges that SMMC falsely inflated its bed count to Medicare in order to receive higher payments under Medicare’s Disproportionate Share Hospital (DSH) adjustment. The DSH adjustment is an extra Medicare payment available to hospitals that meet certain requirements, including having 100 or more acute care beds.

In addition, the government alleges that San Mateo County improperly obtained federal payments under the Medicaid program for services provided to patients at Institutes of Mental Disease (IMDs) who were between the ages of 22 and 64. Such services are ineligible for federal funding, and San Mateo County was required to separately report them to the California Department of Mental Health so that the state could ensure that no federal funds were used to pay for them. Medicaid (known as Medi-Cal in California) is a program funded jointly by federal and state funds. The settlement covers conduct from 1997 to 2007.

More deets after the jump.

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