Posts Tagged ‘medical’

San Mateo Update: Is YOUR Doctor Recommended by a Famous Masked Mexican Wrestler? – “El Chiropractico y Amigo de Blue Demon!”

Thursday, November 13th, 2014

Man, Redwood City looks just like the pre-Zuckerberg-era Mission District.

IMO

7J7C7963 copy

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Why I Favor UCSF Over the Mount Sutro “Cloud” “Forest” NIMBYs: #1 – UCSF Does Stuff, the NIMBYs Don’t

Monday, March 4th, 2013

UCSF is finally getting off its ass and doing something about all those eucalyptus trees and this is the response?

I cry foul.

Now, leaving aside the fact that the Mount Sutro “cloud forest” aint a cloud forest and it aint a forest* neither, UCSF does stuff.

What do the whiny millionaire NIMBY neighbors of UCSF do? Nothing.

Advantage: UCSF.

Of course, there are impoverished hippies who similarly oppose UCSF doing anything to manage this area, so I’m going to look into this when I can.

But the assumption is:

WHY SHOULDN’T UCSF BE ABLE TO MANAGE ITS LAND?

See? UCSF does stuff. What do YOU do? 

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To Be Continued…

*What is it really? A stand, a grove, a wood? (Which is the most insulting?) Alls I know is that Christopher Robin used to play in the Hundred Acre Wood, not the Hundred Acre Forest, right?

Selfish, Petty-Bourgeois, White, Property-Owning NIMBY Millionaires Oppose Nifty New Potrero Hill Kaiser

Friday, December 7th, 2012

Hey look, Kaiser Permanente is coming to Potrero Hill.

But some people are highly upset:

Selfish,*

YEP. Pretty much.

Petty-Bourgeois,

YEP

White,

YEP. I’d be surprised if they weren’t.

Property-Owning,

YEP. Obsessed with real estate they are, my precious.

NIMBY

YEP. “Oh yes, Kommandant  we totally support your mission of expanding your concentration and extermination camps, but couldn’t you select a more “appropriate” site, perhaps in East Auschwitz, or maybe even Auschwitz Annex? As the saying goes, property values uber alles.”

Millionaires

YEP. “Well, I’M not a millionaire, ” they lie.

Sorry, little nursey, your kind just isn’t welcome on “The Hill.”

Via stepsaheadlearners

And hey, where’s our helipad, you know, that other thing what was supposed to have “destroyed” property values in PH.

Let’s bring the pain, bring the sanctimony, let’s write canned letters  to all these people, why not:

The CEO and Board of Directors of Kaiser Permanente
Kaiser Permanente (George C. Halvorson)
LNK Partners (Phil Marineau)
Kaiser Permanente (Christine Robisch)
Kaiser Permanente (Robert Pearl)
Kaiser Permanente (Gregory A. Adams)
Kaiser Permanente (Bernard J. Tyson)
Kaiser Permanente (Randy Wittorp)
Kaiser Permanente (Jay Murphy)
Kaiser Permanente (Cameron White)
SF Planning Department (Wade Wietgrefe)
SF Planning Department (Susan Mickelsen)
SF Planning Department (John Rahaim)
Malia Cohen
Megan Hamilton
Andrea Bruss
Kaiser Permanente Board Member (J. Eugene Grigsby)
Kaiser Permanente Board Member (Edward Pei)
SF Planning Department (Sarah Jones)
SF Planning Department (Ben Fu)

*I’m srsly. Do these people sincerely care about “historic” corrugated steel buildings? No, not at all. So how stupid do they think we are? 

Know Your UCSF Doctors: Hey Look, It’s Dr. Pam Ling, the Med Student from MTV’s “The Real World San Francisco” in 1994

Thursday, September 6th, 2012

You’re too young to remember the era before the Internet, but back in the day, MTV was all we had.* So it was a BFD when the MTV came to town to stage a reality show back in 1994.

Pamela Ling was one of the characters. She played a medical student, which wasn’t hard, because, you know, she was a med student at the time.

Anyway, she became a doctor at UCSF and that where she labors some 18 years later.

See?

Oh, and there was Puck, who pretended to be a bike messenger.

Man, some real bike messengers didn’t like him. That’s what I recall.

Ah mem’ries…

*Well, not me. Cable’s for suckers, these days and back in the day. I think my friend would videotape this show and then we’d watch it off of the VHS.

 

News from Santa Cruz: Born a Man, Died a Woman – Ashawna (Shawn) Hailey Bequests Millions for Marijuana Legalization

Friday, June 1st, 2012

Pretty much.

Check it:

“Software Pioneer Leaves $10 Million Bequest To Five Leading Non-profits In Health And Drug Policy Reform

SANTA CRUZ, Calif., May 30, 2012  – This year, five leading non-profits at the forefront of health and drug policy reform will benefit from a generous bequest of approximately $10 million from the estate of software pioneer Ashawna (Shawn) Hailey. The gift will dramatically increase these organizations’ ability to reform government policies and public attitudes about health and drug policy.

Half of the total bequest–approximately $5 million–will benefit the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), a non-profit research and educational organization working with the FDA and international regulatory agencies to develop psychedelics and marijuana into prescription treatments for patients with unmet medical needs. The gift will be the largest that MAPS has ever received, and will support research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This treatment is currently in Phase 2 pilot studies and is showing very promising results.

MAPS is conducting an international series of Phase 2 pilot studies into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). These studies are laying the groundwork for two larger multi-site Phase 3 trials, required to show the FDA that MDMA is a safe and effective adjunct to psychotherapy for patients with PTSD.

The rest of Ashawna’s gift–about $1.25 million each–will support the efforts of the American Civil Liberties Union, the Drug Policy Alliance, the Marijuana Policy Project, and Second Harvest Food Bank.

Ashawna’s generous bequest is one of only a small number of such gifts to the ACLU. “Her bequest puts a spotlight on our nation’s punitive drug policies, which have failed to achieve public safety and health while putting unprecedented numbers of people behind bars and eroding constitutional rights,” said Vanita Gupta, Deputy Legal Director of the ACLU.

The Drug Policy Alliance will use Ashawna’s gift to strengthen its movement-building efforts. “Ashawna was generous to DPA in her lifetime and beyond because she wanted to build the strongest movement possible to end the drug war and replace it with policies that promote her values of freedom and compassion,” said Ethan Nadelmann, DPA’s executive director. “We’re honored by this bequest, and we will use it to sustain and strengthen the aspects of the movement that were important to her.”

“Our budget this year is only $5 million, so this bequest is turbocharging our efforts to end marijuana prohibition in the United States,” said Rob Kampia, executive director of the Marijuana Policy Project in Washington, D.C. “In fact, Ashawna will likely be our biggest donor this year, and we’ll be using half of her gift to pass the ballot initiative to regulate marijuana like alcohol in Colorado on November 6.”

“This transformative gift from Ashawna will help to ensure that everyone in our community who needs a meal can get one,” said Kathy Jackson, CEO of Second Harvest Food Bank. “She accomplished so much both in her professional life and through her philanthropy, and we are honored that she put her trust in Second Harvest Food Bank with this legacy gift.”

Hailey died on October 14, 2011, in her San Jose, Calif., home at the age of 62. She passed peacefully, and is survived by her children Neal and Nora, and by her twin brother Kim.

After graduating from Texas Tech University in 1970, Shawn designed the launch sequencer for the Sprint Antiballistic Missile System for the Martin Marietta Corporation and in 1974 designed the 9080 microprocessor for AMD. Shawn and Kim co-founded Meta-Software Corp. in 1979 and their HSPICE program remains the gold standard circuit simulator for the electronic design industry.”

And that’s your news from Santa Cruz.

How Many SFPD Cops Does It Take to Babysit 100 Occupiers at the 888 Turk Street Occupation Overnight? About 100?

Monday, April 2nd, 2012

As seen last night – some of the cops on the left and the occupiers on the right:

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Man, the cops were everywhere, as if they were getting ready for an early-morning raid…

The communique:

“On Sunday, April 1st, in solidarity with the Western Regional Advocacy Project’s “We Won’t Get Fooled Again” National Day of Action for the rights of the un-housed, Occupy SF working groups & affinity groups are liberating a vacant building and converting it into a social center, shelter and food bank for the people. We have already demonstrated, for 82 days, what is possible when a space is liberated and reclaimed. The encampments at 101 Market St and Justin Herman / B. Manning Plaza were successful experiments in non-hierarchical organizing where resources were shared in a gift economy and collective decisions made through consensus, while food, shelter and medical care were provided to the greater community.

This action on Sunday is not a temporary protest, but a permanent occupation intended to establish a social center. We will transform this vacant building into a productive and vibrant space, just as we did in the plaza occupation, and we wish others to take similar actions and more.

Wealth inequality is increasing, the environment is being destroyed, the police state and drug war are devastating our communities and social movements, while our foreign wars enrich the 1% at the expense of our troops and innocent civilians. In San Francisco alone, thousands sleep on the street while thousands of houses and apartments lay empty. From Chapel Hill to Seattle, from New York to Oakland, people are rising up to directly change the social and economic system by liberating vacant buildings and reclaiming them for the people.

We are taking this action to bring immediate relief and housing to homeless youth in our community, and to provide a space for assembling, sharing food and healing for all people.”

Hospital Rooms at the Forthcoming “UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay” are Oprah-Approved, More or Less

Friday, November 18th, 2011

The Future is coming to Mission Bay and this is what it will look like. Get all the deets below.

Hurray!

  • Private room. Nearly all patient rooms will be private, with the exception of intensive care nurseries designed for multiple births.
  • Spacious bathroom with double doors. Every UCSF patient room will have its own large bathroom with a wide entry door.
  • Adaptable head wall. Patient rooms will include an optimized boom mount on the ceiling that will increase room flexibility and open up more floor space.
  • Hand-sanitizer pump. Hand-washing sinks will be located upon the entrance to each room.
  • Sound-absorbing ceiling tiles. The accessible ceiling tiles in each room are designed to absorb sound and can be cleaned easily.
  • Soothing music. Patients will be able to personalize their music selections; music will not be piped in.
  • A view of nature. Rooms will offer a range of views, from gardens to the San Francisco Bay to the ballpark.
  • Light-filled window. Every room will include a huge window.
  • Carpeting. Rubber floors will promote infection control, reduce noise and offer increased comfort for patients and staff.

(Source: Mary Phillips, project manager for interior design for Mission Bay Hospitals Project)

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“Patient rooms in the UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay, including this acute care patient room at the future women’s specialty hospital, are designed to maximize comfort, efficiency and safety.

The new UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay is planned as a shining example of evidence-based hospital design, an increasingly prevalent trend built on research suggesting that design can improve health outcomes by increasing safety and reducing stress among patients, their families and hospital staff.

Evidence-based design concepts recently reached a huge new audience when O, The Oprah Magazine ran an article in its September issue highlighting the “Fable Hospital 2.0,” a conceptual patient room designed by a team of researchers, architects and health care experts as an ideal facility.

Features of UCSF’s 289-bed Mission Bay hospital complex — including private rooms and bathrooms for nearly all patients; individualized lighting, temperature and music controls; and large windows offering views of serene outdoor spaces — match up almost exactly with those of the Fable Hospital. The most notable exception is UCSF’s decision not to use carpeting in patient rooms, a feature of the Fable room that was deemed an infection risk. Instead, UCSF’s floors will be made of rubber, which absorbs noise and can be cleaned using fewer chemicals than vinyl flooring.

Such decisions about the new women’s, children’s and cancer hospitals slated to open in early 2015 are the result of an extensive, highly collaborative process that engaged leading architects teams of university staff and caregivers, and patients and their families.

“Overall, the facilities will be spectacular, contemporary, appealing and sophisticated,” said Cindy Lima, executive director of the Mission Bay Hospitals Project. “Patients, families and staff alike will benefit from a beautiful and soothing environment that I hope will feel more like a sun-drenched retreat than a hospital.”

Lima was quick to point out that “while stunning, the design is simple and the buildings are highly efficient.”

“We didn’t want people to end up feeling we’d been lavish and irresponsible with resources,” echoed Dr. Elena Gates, chief of the UCSF Division of General Gynecology, who has been involved in the planning process since the beginning. “It’s amazing what one can do while also being quite reasonable.”

More deets after the jump

(more…)

It’s Food Day: Watch “Food Deserts: Legal, Social, and Public Health Challenges” Live from UC Hastings at 1:00 PM

Monday, October 24th, 2011

OMG, it’s Food Day 2011, so check the link to see what’s going on about the Bay Area today.

Here’s the manifesto:

At UC Hastings in Civic Center, the UCSF / UC Hastings Consortium on Law, Science & Health Policy will put on Food Deserts: Legal, Social, and Public Health Challenges starting at 1:00 PM.

Watch it on the livestream, why not? Or see about heading over to this free event yourself.

All the deets:

“Food Deserts: Legal, Social, and Public Health Challenges

Start: 10/24/2011 from 1:00 PM to 7:00 PM
Location: 200 McAllister, Alumni Reception Center

The UCSF / UC Hastings Consortium on Law, Science & Health Policy is sponsoring a conference entitled “Food Deserts: Legal, Social, and Public Health Challenges” on Food Day, October 24, 2011.
The conference will bring together scholars from the health sciences and the law, as well as policymakers, activists, and food industry members, to discuss two important aspects of “food deserts,” places where access to a nutritionally-adequate diet is severely restricted.

One panel, Nourishing Our Neighborhoods: Insights from Law, Planning, and Industry, will cover the broad issue of geographical food deserts, usually urban areas inhabited by mostly-poor people whose transportation and finances are limited, where food sellers are predominantly small stores that cannot stock a wide variety of fresh food items, and where full-service grocery stores hesitate to locate. Are there policies (such as those in zoning rules) that could be changed to enable oases in these food deserts? What impact does, for example, the addition of a full-service grocery store have on the health of the neighboring area?

Another panel, Food and Nutrition in Correctional Institutions, will consider issues relevant to prisons and jails. While food offerings must meet certain basic caloric and nutritional requirements, the institutional nature of food preparation and food service might make that food less than appealing, and the healthier elements of meals might well be those not regularly or fully consumed. The supplemental food offerings – those for sale in these institutions – are not likely to be nutritious. Some research suggests that improved nutrition in prisons leads to improved penal outcomes. If that is so, what policy changes should be implemented? Would such changes be cost-beneficial, considering penal outcomes and the government’s responsibility for health care of prisoners?

At 5 pm, Dr. David Kessler, former Commissioner of the United States Food and Drug Administration and Professor of Pediatrics and Epidemiology and Biostatistics, UCSF, will give the keynote address on The End of Overeating. This conference will be free and open to the public.”

Ever more deets after the jump

(more…)

What’s This – You Can’t Take Photos of Hemp Expo Participants in Front of Oakland City Hall, Per the Mayor?

Tuesday, September 6th, 2011

So Oakland officials didn’t want the MSM or anybody else taking photos of Hemp Expo participants toking up with Oakland City Hall in the background over this weekend’s Hemp Expo 2011?

Seems that way:

KTVU-TV showed what appeared to be an Oakland official instructing the media not to take photos of people smoking in front of City Hall. The official was not identified, but Arturo Sanchez, an assistant to the city administrator told the station, “it’s not that we don’t want the picture, we try to keep this area of City Hall, (and) this public park free of smoke.”

Check it out here at 1:40:

“Do not take a photo of somebody directly in front of City Hall”

Well, some of these people here are lighting up – see?

Via Hempire – click to expand

I don’t know, maybe this edict worked, ’cause I haven’t seen any photos online of people smoking bud in front of City Hall.

Seems funny to have this kind of rule.

All right, Oakland, see you next year…

Oh Hell Yes: UCSF Allows Emergency Room Check-In Online – Wait Just 15 Minutes with InQuickER Service at Parnassus

Tuesday, July 26th, 2011

The average wait for an emergency room visit at UCSF‘s Parnassus Heights campus is 4.5 hours for people with mild medical emergencies? Wow.

Wouldn’t it be nicer to pay $5 to check-in online and then wait at home rather than in the ER?

That’s what UCSF thinks.

Check it:

“UCSF patients with minor medical needs seeking treatment in the Emergency Department now can make an appointment to be seen – waiting at home rather in the hospital – via a new online check-in service called InQuickER.

UCSF Medical Center
UCSF Medical Center is now offering patients with mild medical emergencies a chance to reserve a time to be seen in the Emergency Department using a new online system.

UCSF Medical Center’s Emergency Department (ED) at Parnassus Heights is now offering InQuickER designed for patients with non-threatening minor medical needs.

UCSF patients can register online for a $4.99 fee and pick an open slot for an emergency room visit. The fee will be refunded if they’re not seen within 15 minutes.

In April, UCSF did a trial run with the online service, which 22 people used. UCSF Medical Center launched the system a few weeks ago.

“One thing we encountered during the trial was that a lot of patients were using it inappropriately,” said Jennifer Dearman, the Emergency Department’s patient care manager. “The online registration is screened by ED nurses and we have had to advise some patients to come directly to the ED. This service is for a fast-track kind of patient.”

“For example, a cancer patient on chemotherapy with a fever can have complicated issues and should be seen in the regular ED, so InQuickER is not appropriate for that person.”

Waiting at Home vs. Hospital

About 105 patients a day visit the emergency room at UCSF Medical Center on the Parnassus campus, Dearman said, and the average time between arrival and departure, for those not admitted to the hospital, is four-and-a-half hours.

That’s in keeping with the average wait in 2009 for ER patients throughout California: four hours and 34 minutes –  27 minutes longer than the U.S. average, according to a 2010 report by health care consulting firm Press Ganey.

Dearman said patient satisfaction was the main reason UCSF Medical Center adopted InQuickER. “It also helps us control the flow,” she said. “The general population doesn’t think the emergency room ever has slow times. But it does.”

UCSF is one of 55 health care facilities in 13 states partnering with InQuickER, said spokesman Chris Song. The service, based in Nashville, began in 2006 after its founder, Tyler Kiley, had to go to an emergency room and spent hours witnessing stasis and frustration.

“He just thought there had to be a better way,” Song said. “With our service, you still have to wait but you get to do it somewhere else. Like on your couch instead of being surrounded by other sick people.”

Song said InQuickerER provides patients with convenience, comfort and some level of control. And it allows emergency department staff to know who’s coming and what symptoms they have, so that they can better prepare.

“It can help reduce the burden of peak times and spread it out,” Song said. “It creates more efficiency and a better environment in the waiting room.”

So far, more than 10,000 people have used the service; 95 percent have been seen within the 15-minute window. In a triage situation, of course, even people who have registered will have to wait. When there are delays, users are notified through text messages and emails with updated projections on treatment times.

The service is available online at https://ucsfmedicalcenter.inquicker.com/. It is growing rapidly, Song said, which is not surprising: A study led by San Francisco General Hospital emergency physician Renee Hsia, MD, MSc, found that the number of hospital-based emergency departments in the United States is declining, despite an increase in the number of patients seeking emergency care.

The study by Hsia, an assistant professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine in the UCSF School of Medicine, was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in May. It reported that 27 percent of urban and suburban emergency rooms have closed in the last two decades.”

Hurray!