Posts Tagged ‘meters’

Compare SF (Most Expensive Parking Tickets in the Western Hemisphere) with Downtown San Mateo (50 Cent/Hr Parking Meters)

Friday, October 10th, 2014

Compare A with B, as seen in the City of San Mateo:

P1140358 copy

But the SFMTA wants more more more, so it’s hatched a plan called Prop A, to raise your rent (literally) and/or take your propertah taxes to pay for, among other things, cost overruns on the entirely unnecessary pork-barrel project called the Central Subway.

Hey, speaking of which:

“During a pair of recent presentations at city political clubs, MTA commissioner Cheryl Brinkman, arguing on behalf of Prop. A, stated that a City Attorney’s opinion concluded that, when it comes to bond language, the terms “shall” and “may” are identical.

Huh.

Brinkman now says she’s not entirely sure what she said. Multiple witnesses are more certain: ‘She did say that!’ recalls Potrero Hill Democrats president Joni Eisen.”

So, what’s going on inside Cheryl Brinkman’s head when she says stuff like this? Is it a fugue state? Is it simple lying? Or maybe somebody lied to her? Or she’s under so much pressure to keep her “job,” but what does it pay, like $100 a month and a free FastPass? And she voted FOR charging people at parking meters on Sundays only to change her mind the next year when she voted AGAINST? Oh, so the SFMTA could instead get VLF money from taxpayers, except that plan got shelved right after she voted.

If she were fired from the SFMTA and then replaced with a spineless jellyfish, how would anyone notice, how would anyone be able to tell the diff?

What SFO Needs are Longer Runways that are Farther Apart, What SFO is Getting are $7000 Fritz Hansen “Egg” Chairs

Thursday, January 16th, 2014

Look what UAL has in store for you at SFO:

“Comfortable seating options that include the iconic Fritz Hansen “egg” chairs and swivel lounge chairs”

All is forgiven, United, ’cause I’m sitting on one of your “iconic” egg chairs.*

And of course the rest of Terminal 3 will soon be loaded up with every other flavor of the month airport accessory.

But the citizens of San Francisco don’t owe the flying public an assortment of googaws, no no. What the citizens of San Francisco  owe the flying public are longer, better runways that are farther apart from each other, you know, runways that don’t need a special dispensation from the FAA. To wit:

Damn the torpedo fish (or whatever else is down there), full speed ahead (with longer and better runways farther apart)

OK then.

And oh, the concomitant Egg™ Footstool costs thousands of dollars  as well.

Happy Flying!

*If United sprang for leather, then the retail price is $16k each, srsly.

Ever more deets after the jump.

(more…)

Our SFMTA is Turning Neighborhood Parking Blocks into Parking Meter Zones – Here, In Civic Center – Why Don’t They Try This in Pacific Heights?

Wednesday, August 21st, 2013

Or should I say “Specific Whites?”

Anywho, this is McAllister betwixt Gough and Franklin, betwixt Civic Center and the PJs – it used to be a two-hour parking zone used by SFUSD employees and residents with Residential Parking Permits, and, of course, clever Mercedes Benz-driving Senior Deputies.

Now, it’s parking meters all the way: 

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What’s the reason why the SFMTA won’t ever dare to put parking meters in Pacific Heights, since parking meters are so00000 great?

 

The Legacy of SFPark: Scores of Unused Parking Spaces at New, Federally-Subsidized Meters

Tuesday, July 23rd, 2013

[UPDATE: Confession time – I’ve never used a “smart” parking meter, so I don’t know what they look like. I know the SFPark meters have blue stickers on the sides, that’s about it. So the new meters depicted below are not SFPark meters and, ergo, they were not advertised as being “good for all drivers.” Anyway, read the comments to see my error.]

So SFPark is “good for all drivers?”

Perhaps for some, but not for those who used to park here, in the project-y Western Addition.

Turk on a weekday:

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Hey SFPark/SFMTA/DPT/MUNI, why not try market-rate pricing instead?

You know, pricing lower than what you’re charging now.

Just asking…

Oh, and is SFPark good for federal taxpayers?

Discuss.

Oh and is the Central Subway good for federal taxpayers?

Discuss that too, if you want…

OMG, You Totally Need to Check Out an Electricity Meter from the SF Public Library – See How Much Juice You’re Using

Monday, January 28th, 2013

Well of course you know how much juice you’re using on a a monthly basis, but if you go to your local branch library you’ll be able to check out an electricity meter that’ll tell you how much each of your appliances is sucking down.

Like this:

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The entire program is ably explained here by the San Francisco Chronicle’s Deb Wandelll. (And obviously, people, make sure you unplug you old analog 13″  CRT TVs that you don’t even use anymore…)

I’ll tell you, I haven’t borrowed anything from the lieberry in a good long time, but this thing I just checked out myself.

The big fridge is brand new and you can tell by looking at this meter, so that’s good. (I wish it didn’t have to be an expensive counter-depth model but this one was the biggest model available that would fit through some super-narrow Victorian doorways (after taking both fridge doors off, yish))

Now the mini fridge and the chest freezer, well, they’re just not built as well so they cost a pretty penny to run even though they’re newish. Oh well.

The 70″ Sharp is from 2011 – it’s fine. It’s LED after all.

Speaking of which, you can light up a whole room with a “25 watt” LED light on a desk lamp, as I do. The meter says that these bulbs burn 5 watts, which is about what I figured.

You can’t use the meter to see what your overhead room lights are using, but you can just look at the bulbs’ ratings for that. (2012 was probably the first year it made sense to convert to LED lighting  - Costco is now selling heavily-subsidized bulbs so you ought to get some yourself.)

Or if you want, you can just buy a meter from Amazon, I don’t care. But then what do you do with the meter when you’re done with it.

Congratulations to the SFPL for this program

OMG, Our San Francisco Public Library is Now Letting Your Check Out Electric Meters for Free – Save $$ at Home

Wednesday, January 16th, 2013

Soon you’ll be able to see how much juice each of your appliances is using by simply checking out a meter as if it were a book.

But act fast – these things should prove popular.

All the deets:

“San Francisco Public Library to Offer Home Metering Devices - To Measure Home Appliance Energy Use - Adds to list of services for city residents

SAN FRANCISCO, Jan 16, 2013 – The San Francisco Public Library today launched a new program to offer library patrons What’s Your Watt home electric metering devices as a tool to measure energy usage in home electronic appliances.

Sponsored by Wells Fargo and Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E), What’s Your Watt is a collaborative effort by the San Francisco Public Library’s Green Stacks program, the Department of the Environment (SF Environment), and the Business Council on Climate Change (BC3). Wells Fargo presented the idea for the program and a seed grant to purchase meters, which are now available for check out at all 28 San Francisco public libraries. PG&E provided the home metering devices. Borrowers may take the devices home to determine wattage, associated costs and C02 emissions information for all electrical appliances, including computers, refrigerators and hair dryers.

“Thanks to the generous support of Wells Fargo and PG&E, San Francisco library users can now check out a home energy metering device along with their books,” said Melanie Nutter, director of SF Environment. “We are delighted that our libraries and local businesses are so committed to helping San Franciscans reduce their energy use, save money and lower their carbon emissions.”
Standard library borrowing rules apply for the home metering devices, which can be checked out for three weeks. Each branch library and the SFPL Green Bookmobile will have two devices and the Main Library will have six devices.

The What’s Your Watt home metering devices are simple to use and come with instructions in English, Spanish, Chinese and Russian. Additional information can be found at: www.sfenvironment.org/whatsyourwatt.

“It is our hope that San Franciscans will take advantage of this program so they can reduce their energy consumption to lower their energy bills, while benefitting the environment as well—both great goals to start in the new year,” said Tracy Curtis, president of Wells Fargo’s San Francisco market.

About SFPL Green Stacks
San Francisco Public Library’s Green Stacks is dedicated to helping the City go green. Libraries have always been dedicated to free, renewable resources and this new, citywide program highlights the environmental initiatives, programs, exhibitions and information created and supported by today’s library system. In partnership with SF Environment and Friends of the San Francisco Public Library, Green Stacks empowers all library users to live a more eco-friendly life.

About SF Environment
The San Francisco Department of the Environment (SF Environment) creates visionary policies and innovative programs that promote social equity, protect human health, and lead the way toward a sustainable future. We put our mission into action by mobilizing communities and providing the resources needed to safeguard our homes, our city, and ultimately our planet. For more information on SF Environment, visit: www.sfenvironment.org

About the Business Council on Climate Change
The Business Council on Climate Change (BC3) is a public-private partnership between local government and the business community that works to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in San Francisco through collaboration and direct action. For more information on BC3, visit: www.bc3sfbay.org

About Wells Fargo
In April 2012, Wells Fargo released a set of environmental commitments to be achieved by 2020; including reducing the company’s environmental impact, financing the transition to a greener economy and encouraging stronger and more sustainable communities. A leader in reducing its own greenhouse gas emissions and building sustainably, Wells Fargo has been recognized by the Carbon Disclosure Project and the U.S. Green Building Council. Since 2006, Wells Fargo has provided more than $11.7 billion in environmental finance, supporting sustainable buildings and renewable energy projects nationwide. This includes investments in more than 260 solar projects and 34 wind projects that generate enough clean renewable energy to power hundreds of thousands of American homes each year. For more information, please visit: www.wellsfargo.com/environment.

Wells Fargo & Company is a nationwide, diversified, community-based financial services company with $1.4 trillion in assets. Founded in 1852 and headquartered in San Francisco, it provides banking, insurance, investments, mortgage, and consumer and commercial finance through more than 9,000 stores, 12,000 ATMs, the Internet (wellsfargo.com), and has offices in more than 35 countries to support customers who conduct business in the global economy. With more than 265,000 team members, Wells Fargo serves one in three households in the US.

About PG&E
Pacific Gas and Electric Company is one of the largest combined natural gas and electric utilities in the US. Based in San Francisco, with 20,000 employees, the company delivers some of the nation’s cleanest energy to 15 million people in Northern and Central California.

Funding for What’s Your Watt was provided through a partnership with the City and County of San Francisco. Through the partnership, PG&E offers comprehensive energy efficiency services and technical assistance to residential, small commercial, large commercial and municipal customers. This program is funded in part by California utility customers and administered by PG&E under the auspices of the California Public Utilities Commission.

DPT SFPark Fail: Expensive Sensors “Bedeviled by Electromagnetic Interference from Overhead Trolley Lines” per NYT

Wednesday, December 26th, 2012

Instead of the SFMTA MUNI DPT SFPark happy talk what you’ve been getting from the San Francisco Examiner, why not check out what the New York Times has to say about San Francisco’s expensive SFPark new parking meter program.

“PLACE “smart” in front of a noun and you immediately have something that somehow sounds improved.”

Heh.

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The SF Examiner Gets Lots of Ad Money from the SFMTA – The SF Examiner Now Hearts the SFMTA – Connection?

Thursday, December 20th, 2012

Never have I seen such a one-sided newspaper article having anything to do with the SFMTA / MUNI / DPT.

Check it:

SFpark hourly meters actually save motorists money

But actually, SFPark hourly meters cost motorists money.

Oh well.

Guess which side of this street has brand new parking meters and which side doesn’t. (Yeah, I know it looks like street cleaning day, but it’s not.)

Click to expand

Hey, doesn’t the Examiner run a bunch of ads from the SFMTA saying boosterish stuff like here comes the Central Subway?

Mmmm…

And hey UCLA professor Donald Shoup! Is this kind of thing what you call “responsible parking management?”

What the SFMTA likes to do is spend as much money as it possibly can.

Right?

Mmmm…

And didn’t “motorists” pay the vast vast bulk of the $20,000,000.00 or so that was spent to start SFPark and pay for its concomitant website filled with SFMTA spin?

Yes.

So how does that “save” motorists money?

Mmmm…

 

And the Leader of the Great SoMA Mission Bay Dogpatch SFPark Parking Revolt is Now… Supervisor Jane Kim?

Wednesday, July 18th, 2012

Apparently:

 “People should have to pay for parking. I’m just wondering if there is a less punitive way of doing it for residents,” she said. “I was hoping for more thoughtful alternatives.”

Well that’s Phase 1 – it’s a start.

Phase 2 just might be Direct Action, taking it to the streets to pull up the infernal SFPark meters up by their very roots.

Like this. Achtung, Baby!

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Until that time, the Revolution will continue to be led by Meter Madness and the SFPark.info.

In struggle…

1 PETITIONS

They’re Ba-aaack! The SFMTA Tries to Impose SFPark on Mission Bay Once Again – Plus SFPark.info Website

Friday, May 25th, 2012

I’ll tell you, when the Imperial Japanese Navy tried to invade Wake Island back in WWII, their first attempt, which involved months of planning, failed. The IJN was highly embarrassed but they knew that it was their job to impose themselves on Wake, to “manage” Wake, so they came back and succeeded on their second try. (And they beheaded a few Marines, but, byegones…)

And I’ll also tell you, when the Imperial SFMTA tried to impose SFPark on the Mission Bay and the Dogpatch and whatnot, their first attempt, which involved months of planning, failed. The SFMTA was highly embarrassed but they knew that it’s their job to impose SFPark, or whatever they’re calling it now, on the area. The college boys of the SFMTA just know, they just know it, that it’s their job to increase the power of the SFMTA and have the SFMTA grow and grow and grow.

Get all the deets on the Second Invasion of Mission Bay right here, and below.

And oh, here’s SFPark.info website, written by people who don’t approve of the worst aspects of the SFMTA and SFPark (or whatever they’re calling it these days.)

All right, now back to the official stuff. Uh, and in case you don’t know it, SFMTA, you suck – more proof of this is that your website has “insecure content.” [UPDATE: Good job, MUNI! You took care of that. Someday, you'll get the hang of the whole "Internet" thing.]

Or so they say:

In closing, MUNI sucks!

“Mission Bay parking planning community meeting – Saturday, June 16

Posted on 05.25.12 in AnnouncementsParking Planning|Share:Bookmark and Share

The public is invited to join the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA) at our second Mission Bay parking planning community meeting. We will discuss the revised plans for parking management in the neighborhood and gather public input. As Mission Bay evolves, we need to ensure that everyone on the road—cars, buses, bicycles, and pedestrians—can travel safely and smoothly.

Mission Bay parking planning community meeting 
Mission Creek Park Pavilion, 290 Channel Street, one block west of 4th and Channel Streets
Saturday, June 16
3-3:30 p.m. – Open House
3:30-4:30 p.m. – Public Comments (sign up by 3:20 p.m.)

The SFMTA seeks public input on the following:

  • Special event pricing to better manage parking demand during large events like Giants games and reduce congestion.
  • Extended meter hours to open up evening parking, particularly during evening games. This is separate from the SFMTA’s citywide Sunday metering proposal.
  • New meter installation schedule for meters approved in 2002, which will have SFpark demand-responsive pricing to ensure an optimum level of open parking spaces as Mission Bay grows.

During the open house section of the meeting, attendees can review plan details, talk directly with project planners, and submit written feedback. The public comment period follows.

CLICK HERE to learn more about Mission Bay parking planning
CLICK HERE for directions to the meeting venue, including nearby public transit

Please feel free to email us if you have any questions about the location or the project.

You can also stay up to date via Twitter and Facebook.”