Posts Tagged ‘Metropolitan Transportation Commission’

Coalition of 48 San Francisco NIMBY Groups Opposes the Coming Changes to Masonic Avenue

Friday, November 15th, 2013

Well, this is news to me. See below.

I’m not seeing a path for victory for the SaveMasonic people, just saying. I mean the SFMTA wants to spend money, the money was gotten, so why would the SFMTA change its mind all of a sudden now that it’s gotten what it wanted?

A recent window sign seen on, where else, on Masonic:

All the deets:

“Metropolitan Transportation Commission
101 – 8th St
Oakland CA 94607
Re: Agenda Item 9(a) – OBAG – Masonic Avenue Complete Streets — MTC,
September 25, 2013

Dear Ms Worth:

The Coalition for San Francisco Neighborhoods (CSFN) is an “umbrella” organization comprised
of 48 individual San Francisco neighborhood associations representing thousands of the city’s
residents.
At its September General Assembly delegates from the CSFN member organizations voted
unanimously in support the following resolution.
Resolved, that the CSFN urges that elected officials, the SFMTA, the
SFCTA, and the MTC must
1. rescind and withdraw their approval and support of the current
Masonic Ave redesign plan,
2. adopt an alternate plan that maintains traffic flow,
3. retain curbside parking on Masonic Ave,
4. establish a better, alternate bicycle route on nearby streets, and
5. install pedestrian safety improvements.
The proposed Masonic Avenue Complete Streets project is estimated to cost $18 million at a
minimum. This money could be better spent. Many affected residents did not receive notice of the
project; adequate EIR has not been performed.
The Coalition for San Francisco Neighborhoods, which reflects citywide neighborhood concerns,
passed this motion unanimously. We urge you to take into account deeply-felt neighborhood
concerns about this. A large part of the city will be negatively impacted by this ill-thought-out
plan. These plans for Masonic Avenue would thwart neighbors’ efforts for real improvement.
In reviewing the plan that you now have before you, we found that there will be significant
impacts that warrant careful inspection and consideration.
CSFN respectfully and very strongly urges you to withdraw the Masonic Avenue
Complete Streets project from OBAG funding until such time as it can be
meaningfully studied, reviewed, and presented to the public.
Thank you for your careful deliberations in this matter; we appreciate your support and
action.

Sincerely,
Judith Berkowitz

President

Cc: Vice Chair Dave Cortese, Alicia C. Aguirre, Tom Azumbrado, Tom Bates, David Campos,
Bill Dodd, Dorene M. Giacopini, Federal D. Glover, Scott Haggerty, Anne W. Halsted,
Steve Kinsey, Sam Liccardo, Mark Luce, Jake MacKenzie, Joe Pirzynski, Jean Quan,
Bijan Sartipi, James P. Sperling, Adrienne J. Tissier, Scott Wiener; Kimberly Hughes,
Georgia Lambert

Coalition for San Francisco Neighborhoods Resolution Regarding Masonic
Avenue Complete Streets

Whereas, Masonic Avenue is an arterial road used daily by 32,000 vehicles, 13,000 bus riders,
over 1,000 pedestrians; and
Whereas, the proposed Masonic Avenue redesign will permanently remove two traffic lanes during
rush hours resulting in increased not reduced congestion on Masonic and surrounding
streets; and
Whereas, pedestrian safety will be lessened, not strengthened; pedestrians boarding the bus or
crossing the street must step over the bicycle lane; and
Whereas, EMS response time will be reduced; new traffic lanes are inadequate for wide emergency
vehicles; and
Whereas, the loss of 167 parking places will adversely affect residents, disabled, seniors, visitors
and others; and
Whereas, MTA counted 31 bicyclists during peak hours on Masonic Ave; nearby Baker St. with
less than 10% of Masonic Ave traffic provides an alternate bicycle route; therefore be it
Resolved, that the CSFN urges that elected officials, the SFMTA, the SFCTA, and the MTC must

1. rescind and withdraw their approval and support of the current Masonic Ave
redesign plan,
2. adopt an alternate plan that maintains traffic flow,
3. retain curbside parking on Masonic Ave,
4. establish a better, alternate bicycle route on nearby streets, and
5. install pedestrian safety improvements.

OMG, the Embarcadero Station Clipper Customer Service Center is Up and Running!

Tuesday, March 1st, 2011

They promised it, and now it’s here, up and running. Hurray!

Deets below.

“If there was a problem yo I’ll solve it. Check out the hook while my DJ revolves it”

That’s right, the transit kiosk in the Embarcadero Station has been “re-engineered and rebranded.”

Starting Wednesday, February 23rd, 2011, your Embarcadero BART/Muni station is going all-out for Clipper. That means that you’ll have a convenient  place to go if you want to trade-in your damaged Clipper Card ‘n stuff.

“Clipper(SM) Customer Service Centers to Open in San Francisco

Background: The Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) has re-engineered and rebranded the transit kiosk in the Embarcadero BART/Muni station to focus on Clipper card customer service. In addition to basic card purchase and add-value transactions available at all Clipper retailers (including more than 100 Walgreens stores), the kiosk offers a higher level of service and equipment, allowing travelers to:

– exchange a damaged or defective card for a new one
– receive senior and youth Clipper cards
– use transit benefit vouchers and/or debit cards to load value onto a Clipper card
– get answers to questions about the Clipper program

Clipper is now used to pay fares on 374,000 transit trips each weekday. Participating operators include AC Transit, BART, Caltrain, San Francisco Muni, Golden Gate Transit & Ferry, Dumbarton Express, SamTrans, and Santa Clara County’s Valley Transportation Authority. MTC is the transportation planning, coordinating and financing agency of the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area.”

 

OMG! Clipper Customer Service Centers to Open in San Francisco – Wednesday, Wednesday, Wednesday!

Monday, February 21st, 2011

That’s right, the transit kiosk in the Embarcadero Station has been “re-engineered and rebranded.”

Starting Wednesday, February 23rd, 2011, your Embarcadero BART/Muni station is going all-out for Clipper. That means that you’ll have a convenient  place to go if you want to trade-in your damaged Clipper Card ‘n stuff.

Like my one and only. It fell to pieces after just a two-day acetone bath. Still works though, as the all-important antenna is mostly intact, mostly.

Click to expand

All the deets are below.

(Now technically, this excloo event is for “the media,” but it’s not a secret or nothing – it’s been posted up for tout le monde to see. Dress up (or down, one or the other) and you’ll fit right in.)

“Clipper(SM) Customer Service Centers to Open in San Francisco

Who: Jon Rubin, MTC Commissioner, Clipper project staff

What: Unveiling of new full-service Clipper(SM) customer service center at Embarcadero BART/Muni station. After Jon Rubin’s remarks, MTC Public Information Officer John Goodwin will lead media to the Ferry Building for a photo/video opportunity at another new customer service center opening in the Bay Crossings store.

When: Wednesday, Feb. 23, 2011, 2 p.m. PST

Where: Concourse Level, East End Embarcadero BART/Muni Station San Francisco

Background: The Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) has re-engineered and rebranded the transit kiosk in the Embarcadero BART/Muni station to focus on Clipper card customer service. In addition to basic card purchase and add-value transactions available at all Clipper retailers (including more than 100 Walgreens stores), the kiosk offers a higher level of service and equipment, allowing travelers to:

– exchange a damaged or defective card for a new one
– receive senior and youth Clipper cards
– use transit benefit vouchers and/or debit cards to load value onto a Clipper card
– get answers to questions about the Clipper program

Clipper is now used to pay fares on 374,000 transit trips each weekday. Participating operators include AC Transit, BART, Caltrain, San Francisco Muni, Golden Gate Transit & Ferry, Dumbarton Express, SamTrans, and Santa Clara County’s Valley Transportation Authority. MTC is the transportation planning, coordinating and financing agency of the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area.”

The MTC is Super-Excited About the Recent Increase in Clipper Card Use in the Bay Area

Tuesday, September 21st, 2010

Our Metropolitan Transportation Commission is pleased as punch because people are using Clipper cards more these days.

Especially MUNI riders, but aren’t they sort of being forced into using Clipper?

Anyway, here’s the gritty nitty. Go MUNI, Go!

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And here are the deets, for your big-whoop file:

Clipper Card Usage Climbing Rapidly

OAKLAND, Calif., Sept. 20 — The number of Bay Area transit riders using Clipper to pay fares on buses, trains and ferries rose to an average of 139,725 during the four weekdays following the Labor Day holiday. This marks a 16 percent increase from the roughly 120,225 average weekday boardings during the week ending September 3, and a jump of more than 100 percent since the formal launch of the Clipper card in mid-June.

San Francisco Muni, which carries the largest number of transit passengers in the Bay Area, also is registering the largest number of daily Clipper boardings. Muni accounted for an average of  57,750 Clipper boardings during the four regular workdays ending Sept. 10. This was followed by BART with 41,975 weekday boardings; and AC Transit with an average of 26,175 Clipper boardings each weekday. Smaller numbers of passengers used Clipper cards to board Golden Gate Transit & Ferry, Caltrain and Dumbarton Express vehicles.

Muni is nearing completion of a year-long project to replace aging fare gates throughout its Muni Metro station network with new gates that will only accept Clipper cards. The roughly $29 million initiative includes the installation of new ticket vending machines, through which customers can purchase new single-use Clipper cards. Installation is now complete at the Civic Center and Powell Street stations, with the finishing touches underway at the Castro, Church Street, Embarcadero and Forest Hill stations. Installation work is expected to begin next week at the Van Ness and West Portal stations.

The Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC), which oversees the Clipper program, is working with participating transit agencies and with program contractor Cubic Transportation Systems Inc. to solve several customer service problems exposed by the rapid growth in Clipper card usage. These include a shortage of experienced front-line staff at the Clipper Customer Service Center; hardware problems that are hindering proper clock synchronizationon the Clipper card readers installed on 43 buses operated by AC Transit, Golden Gate Transit and San Francisco Muni; and software integration of some “business rules” created by the myriad combinations of fare policies established by the Bay Area’s more than two dozen separate transit agencies.

Ever more deets after the jump

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What MTC is Calling Congestion Pricing on the Bay Bridge Isn’t, Actually

Monday, June 28th, 2010

Obviously, the Metropolitan Transportation Commission can charge whatever it wants on our broke-down San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, but raising the toll at 5:00 AM every weekday morning when the bridge isn’t congested at all is not what can fairly be called congestion pricing.

Call it something else, MTC. Call it a toll increase, if you want. Whatever you call it, it’s not an implementation of congestion pricing.  

Mssrs. Matier and Ross are highlighting this issue today

“Bay Bridge drivers are going to be forking over an extra $2 during the morning “peak” commute hours of 5 to 10 a.m. starting Thursday – even though the Metropolitan Transportation Commission, which made the call, has stats showing the actual peak is from 6:30 to 8:30 a.m.”

Economist Bill Vickrey, the “Father of Congestion Pricing,” must be rolling over in his grave over there in New York.

What good does it do to send a signal to drivers that it’s better for society if they drive over the bridge at 4:50 AM vs. 5:10 AM? It does no good at all.

 

The latest missive explaining tings from the Ministry of Truth, after the jump.

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Our Richmond-San Rafael and Antioch Bridges to get Dedicated Carpool Lanes by Mid-June

Thursday, June 3rd, 2010

The news from our Metropolitan Transportation Commission is that you now have yet another reason to get a Fastrak and/or get in on a carpool. Check it out, below.

Don’t forget to look outside your window as you carpool on the Richmond-San Rafael. You won’t want to miss seeing San Francisco’s northernmost point (that private island on the left) or the B&B (can you see it on the right?) that drove Danielle Steele crazy:

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Richmond-San Rafael, Antioch Bridges to Get Dedicated Carpool Lanes

Cash Tollpayers Must Stay Right on Richmond-San Rafael Approach

OAKLAND, Calif., June 1  — Toll plaza changes designed to speed travel for carpoolers are coming this month to the Antioch and Richmond-San Rafael bridges.

Beginning in mid-June, carpoolers who travel across the Antioch and Richmond-San Rafael bridges during peak commute periods will be able for the first time to take advantage of dedicated high-occupancy vehicle lanes at the far left side of the bridges’ toll plazas — eliminating the need to stop at a staffed toll booth. Carpool commuters at these bridges currently use mixed-flow cash/FasTrak lanes, and must stop briefly at a staffed toll booth for occupancy verification.

In addition to the new dedicated carpool lane, work crews will restripe the westbound Interstate 580 approach to the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge toll plaza to add a second FasTrak-only lane. During peak commute periods, carpoolers and other FasTrak customers will share the far left lane, while the center lane will be reserved for drivers who pay their tolls with FasTrak. Drivers who use cash to pay their toll will be restricted to the right lane of the toll plaza approach. Cash tollpayers may experience additional delays as drivers become accustomed to the new configuration.

The carpool lane changes at the Antioch and Richmond-San Rafael toll plazas come several weeks before the July 1 start of a new toll schedule that includes a discounted $2.50 toll on weekdays from 5 a.m. to 10 a.m. and from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. for carpools at all seven of the Bay Area’s state-owned toll bridges. Carpoolers must use a designated carpool lane and pay their toll with FasTrak® to qualify for the toll discount. FasTrak toll tags are available online at www.511.org or at Walgreens, Safeway and Costco locations around the Bay Area. New customers who pick up a FasTrak toll tag at a participating retailer before July 15 can get up to $10 in free tolls.

The new toll schedule also will include a $5 regular auto toll at six of the state-owned bridges; and “congestion pricing” at the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, with auto tolls varying based on the day of the week and/or the time of day. Bay Bridge tolls will be set at $6 during the weekday morning and afternoon peak periods, at $4 during weekday off-peak periods, and at $5 all day on Saturdays and Sundays.

Caltrans owns, operates and maintains the state highway system, including seven Bay Area toll bridges. BATA, which is directed by the same policy board as the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC), administers toll revenues from the region’s state-owned toll bridges. MTC is the transportation planning, financing and coordinating agency for the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area.

Bay Area Airport Capacity Study – Public Hearings Coming to a City Near You

Friday, May 7th, 2010

The Bay Area is running out of airport so a big study is going on to try to see what to do.

Maybe some of our smaller airfields could pick up some of the load, or maybe the military could pitch in, somehow.

Anyway, they’re holding public meetings soon so why don’t you get in on the fun?

 Monday, May 10, 2010, 7 pm – 9 pm
 Community Room
 Municipal Services Center
 33 Arroyo Drive, South San Francisco

 Tuesday, May 11, 2010, 7 pm – 9 pm
 First Floor, Multipurpose Room
 675 Texas Street, Fairfield

 Wednesday, May 12, 2010, 7 pm – 9 pm
 Port of Oakland Exhibit Room
 530 Water Street, Oakland

Are a lot more bigger airplanes in our future? How many 1000-passsenger Airbus A380-1000′s (or more realistically, 900-passenger A380-900′s) will we need?

A watery welcome for a big boy A380-800 (called El Gordo by pilotos) at SFO not too long ago:

At least there’s room for a horseshoe bar in a superjumbo. As seen over the Farallones:

If we can’t have more better runways at sometimes-foggy SFO, then look forward to ever bigger aircraft, for better or worse…

All right, see you there at those meetings.

All the deets, after the jump.

And here’s a comment from knowledgeable ActionNewsSF. (7500 Followers Can’t Be Wrong.)

ActionNewsSF says:
May 7, 2010 at 3:37 pm 

“Interesting topic. After reading this article, I spoke with an “aviation expert”. We both agreed that either Buchanan Field in Concord or the Livermore Airport makes the best sense. We were surprised that the Livermore Airport is not on this map. The challenges for both of these locations would be selling to the residents who live near the airports.

Livermore is a great location due to its proximity to Modesto, Stockton, and Sacramento. An upgrade to Highway 84 and Vasco Road could makes this a very attractive site.

Concord is a good location because it is on a BART line and close to Solano County, Stockton and Sacramento.

Moffett is too close to SFO and SJC.

Byron is too far for 580 and upgrading an airport there means we have to build more freeways and extend BART to the middle of nowhere.

Napa would mean major upgrades to Highways 29, 12, and 37. This airport would really only be able to serve Napa, Solano and possibly Sonoma Counties. There really is no major transit line that serves this area. You know what that means? 30 years after it’s built, we’ll have to spend billions extending BART across the Carquinez Strait and through Vallejo.

Travis AFB in Fairfield is a possibility, but really too far from the Greater Bay Area. Once again, this means major upgrades to an already congested I-80.

Hopefully existing infrastructure and having to deal with the restrictions of nearby residents, something San Jose has to deal with, will be considered. I also hope that any future project will not waste our money, as the MTC did recently by renaming the Translink card.”

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OneBayArea Meets in Oakland Today – Four Bay Area Regional Agencies + 350 Pols

Thursday, April 22nd, 2010

Did you know that “The Future Begins Today?” Well it does, according to the four Bay Area regional agencies meeting right now in Oaktown.

That’s right, it’s Alphabet Soupalooza 2010 and it’s going off at the Marriott City Center in the 510. All your faves are there:

Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG)

Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC)

Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD)

Bay Conservation and Development Commission (BCDC)

Put them all together and you get ABAGMTCBAAQMDBCDC! (Or OneBayArea.org, take your pick.)

All the deets:

Region Celebrates Earth Day With Launch of ‘One Bay Area’ Collaborative Effort at ABAG General Assembly and Summit

Regional Agencies and Local Governments Join Together to Chart Course to Meet Greenhouse Gas Reduction Targets

OAKLAND, Calif., April 22 — Four Bay Area regional agencies today are launching a major outreach initiative, One Bay Area, at a regional assembly bringing together 350 Bay Area city and county elected officials, regional leaders and community stakeholders at the Oakland Marriott City Center. The regional agency partners — the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG), the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC), the Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD) and the Bay Conservation and Development Commission (BCDC) — are coming together in a joint General Assembly and summit to mark the beginning of development of the SB 375 Sustainable Communities Strategy for the Bay Area. SB 375 refers to landmark legislation (authored by Daryl Steinberg and passed by the California Legislature in 2008) requiring regions in California to develop strategies for combating climate change and promoting sustainable communities.

“One Bay Area” harnesses the resources of regional agencies, local governments, county congestion management agencies, local planning and public works directors, city and county managers, public transit agencies, community members and stakeholder groups. These agencies must work together to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions produced by cars and light trucks in the region over the next 10-25 years. These efforts will be showcased on a new website launched today, located at www.OneBayArea.org.

“One Bay Area underscores the simple and fragile fact that there is only one Bay Area to pass on to our children and grandchildren,” said Scott Haggerty, chair of MTC and Alameda County supervisor, who will be one of the speakers at the Summit.

Ever more deets, after the jump.

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BATA Meeting – Say Hello to Higher Tolls to Cross the Bay Bridge Starting July 1, 2010

Tuesday, December 8th, 2009

Well the Bay Area Toll Authority (BATA) came to Market Street last night to ask the public the best way to raise tolls on Bay Area bridges (except the Golden Gate Bridge, an entity unto itself).

Who was at the meeting early and ready to go? None other than BATA Oversight Committee Vice-Chair and San Francisco Supervisor Chris Daly avec charming daughter Grace:

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This was the open house part of the meeting early on. Not a huge turnout:

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To see why, let’s look at the numbers on the numerous display boards:

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BATA isn’t asking people if there should be an increase, but rather, which increase plan is the best:

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The seismic safety upgrading for the Dumbarton and Antioch bridges – that’s the primary issues, a billion-dollar issue. How is BATA going to pay for that?

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Well pick your poison. How would you balance charges for carpoolers vs. trucks (with all them axles) and would you be into congestion pricing? (Proposal 2 is called the Homer Simpson Option, due to his practice of charging $10 per axle when he lets people park on his lawn.)

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Speaking of axles, you big rig truck drivers have gotten a free ride over the years, some people think:

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Here are the anticipated impacts of each option:

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How do these proposed tolls campare to what the Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority charges people to drive across the Verrazano Narrows Bridge, you know, the one with the highest toll in America? Quite nicely, thanks for asking!

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So now, what do YOU think is the best way to raise revenue?

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You can tell your commissioners about your choice:

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Let’s grab a holiday cookie and mull things over:

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It looks like staff is going to make a recomendation tomorrow…

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…and your toll will go up at least a dollar as of July 1, 2010.

Now You Have Another Chance to Ask for a Bay Area Bridge Toll Increase: Dec. 7th, 2009

Monday, November 16th, 2009

Ah, the Powers That Be. They don’t just raise rates on you all of a sudden, oh no. They have meetings first, to tell you how “needed” and ”necessary” their proposed “adjustments” are. Then, when the rates go up, they’ll tell you all about the meetings on that very topic that you neglected to attend.

As here, where the Bay Area Toll Authority (BATA) will send its youngest and cutest staffers straight into San Francisco to hand out papers and pencils for you, the Public, to scribble your appreciation. Or criticism, whatever.

Maybe “Bay Bridge Mike” will be at the meeting on Pearl Harbor Day, 2009. We Can Only Hope:Our broken bridge, more broked than ever, but let’s have fun with it, cause, you know, we’re super-competent at our jobs.

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Oh well.

Paying more to cross our mismanaged bridges – well that’s not a burden, it’s an “OPPORTUNITY.” (Paging George Lakoff…)

“OPPORTUNITIES

Bridge Toll Hike Proposed for Earthquake Safety

Attend a hearing regarding a possible toll increase on the seven state-owned Bay Area toll bridges on November 17, December 3, or December 7, 2009. Can’t attend? Take our online survey!

As promised, the deets – BATA bing, BATA boom!:

Bay Area Toll Authority Schedules San Francisco Hearing on Proposed Toll Hike

Web Survey Also Available for Online Comments

The Bay Area Toll Authority (BATA) has added a fourth public hearing to receive public testimony on options for a proposed toll increase on the seven state-owned Bay Area toll bridges.

The newly scheduled public hearing will be held at 6:30 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 7, in San Franciscoat the downtown campus of San Francisco State University, 835 Market Street, Room 609. Additional public hearings are scheduled at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 17, in the City Council Chambers of San Mateo City Hall, 330 West 20th Avenue, San Mateo, and at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 3, in the Wisteria Room of the Concord Senior Center (located in John F. Baldwin Park), 2727 Parkside Circle, Concord. All three public hearings will feature a short open house (from 6:30 to 7 p.m.) and a staff presentation (beginning at 7 p.m.) prior to taking public testimony. The first public hearing took place on Nov. 4 in Oakland.

Bay Area residents who are unable to attend one of the public hearings can make their views known via an online survey at: www.mtc.ca.gov/get_involved. The survey will be available through Dec. 21.

The toll increase, if approved, likely would take effect July 1, 2010. It is needed to raise an additional $160 million in annual revenues, chiefly to finance the estimated $750 million cost of necessaryseismic retrofit projects on the Antioch and Dumbarton bridges. Other factors include a slow but steady decline in toll-paying traffic on the state-owned bridges during each of the past five years, increasing operational expenses, and rising debt (due in part to the upheaval in the municipal bonds markets over the past two years). The proposed toll increase would be in effect on the Antioch, Benicia-Martinez, Carquinez, Dumbarton, Richmond-San Rafael, San Mateo-Hayward and San Francisco-Oakland Bay bridges. (The toll proposal does not affect the Golden Gate Bridge, which is owned and operated by an independent authority.)

The toll options under consideration would all raise the needed $160 million annually. Ideas on the table, detailed below, include raising the base toll on automobiles and motorcycles by $1 (to $5), and in so doing raise the first $100 million of new annual revenues. The remaining funds would be generated by a combination of increasing the per-axle toll for trucks and/or introducing a toll for carpools, which would be collected electronically via FasTrak® toll tags. Also under consideration is the introduction of peak-hour congestion pricing on the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge. Preliminary analysis shows that such pricing could reduce morning peak delay on the Bay Bridge by 15 to 30 percent.

 –  $5 toll for two-axle vehicles (autos and motorcycles); $3 for carpools
     during peak periods (Monday through Friday); and $6 per each
     additional axle for trucks. Carpools would be charged for the seismic
     retrofit portion of toll charges and would be required to obtain a
     FasTrak® toll tag to qualify for the reduced rate; FasTrak® equipment
     would be required in all carpool lanes.
 –  $5 toll for two-axle vehicles (autos and motorcycles) and $10 per each
     additional axle. There would be no charge for carpools during peak
     periods (Monday through Friday).
 –  Congestion pricing would be introduced on the Bay Bridge; charges
     would be $6 for two-axle vehicles during peak periods (Monday through
     Friday) and $4 for autos and motorcycles during off-peak hours (Monday
     through Friday), with a $5 charge for two-axle vehicles on weekends. A
     $6 charge for each additional axle, at all times and on all days,
     would be in effect with this option, along with a $3 charge for
     carpools during peak periods (Monday through Friday).

Written comments on the proposed toll increase will be accepted until 4 p.m., Dec. 21, 2009; they may be submitted to the BATA Public Information office at 101 Eighth Street, Oakland, CA, 94607-4700, faxed to BATA at 510.817.5848, or sent via e-mail to tolls@mtc.ca.gov. After receipt and review of public comments, the BATA Oversight Committee will consider the adoption of a revised toll schedule in early 2010.

BATA, which is directed by the same policy board as the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC), administers tolls on the region’s seven state-owned bridges. State legislation in 1997 authorized BATA to administer the base $1 toll on the Bay Area state-owned toll bridges.

BATA’s responsibilities were expanded by August 2005 legislation to include administration of all toll revenue and joint oversight of the toll bridge construction program with Caltrans and the California Transportation Commission. MTC is the transportation planning, financing and coordinating agency for the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area.

See you there!*

*Maybe not.