Posts Tagged ‘Midnight’

Coming to Your Neighborhood Soon: Giant RV’s! – Chased Away From Certain SF Streets – Overnight Parking Whac-A-Mole

Friday, February 7th, 2014

So SFGov is banning RV’s from parking overnight on certain streets, but people are worried that the RVers will just set up camp a block or so away.

We’ll see how it goes.

But you might need to prepare yourself for more of this:

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January 31st is RV Judgment Day in San Francisco – Just Look at All the Places You Won’t be Able to Sleep Over Anymore

Thursday, January 23rd, 2014

Wow, the SFMTA certainly seems to know where you all are parking your RV’s for overnight stays on the streets of San Francisco.

Just look:

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You’ll have to find new places to park pretty soon. (I can already guess at the new places where all the urban campers are going to go.)

Here’s the reaction from The Richmond District Blog.

And here’s the gritty nitty from the SFMTA itself - Oversize Vehicle Overnight Parking Restriction Pilot Evaluation and Recommendations

All the deets:

“CITY and COUNTY of SAN FRANCISCO
SAN FRANCISCO MUNICIPAL TRANSPORTATION AGENCY
Order # 5216
FOR PUBLIC HEARING
The Sustainable Streets Division of the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency will hold a public hearing on Friday, January 31, 2014, at 10:00 AM, in Room 416 (Hearing Room 4), City Hall, 1 Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place, San Francisco, CA 94102, to consider the following proposals:

ESTABLISH – OVERSIZE VEHICLE RESTRICTION (NO PARKING, MIDNIGHT TO 6 AM, DAILY, FOR VEHICLES MORE THAN 7 FEET TALL OR 22 FEET LONG)

A. Sunset District
37th Avenue, west side, between Ortega Street and Rivera Street
39th Avenue, east side, between Quintara Street and Rivera Street
41st Avenue, east side, between Ortega Street and Quintara Street
Lakeshore Drive, both sides, between Lake Merced Boulevard and Sloat Boulevard
Lincoln Way, south side, between 36th Avenue and 37th Avenue
Ortega Street, south side, between 37th Avenue and 41st Avenue
Quintara Street, north side, between 39th Avenue and 40th Avenue
Quintara Street, both sides, between 40th Avenue and 41st Avenue
Rivera Street, north side, between 37th Avenue and 39th Avenue
Junipero Serra Boulevard, both sides, between Portola Drive and 19th Avenue

B. Mission District
15th Street, south side, between Folsom Street and Harrison Street
16th Street, both sides, between Harrison Street and Potrero Avenue
17th Street, both sides, between Harrison Street and Potrero Avenue
17th Street, both sides, between Folsom and Harrison Streets
18th Street, both sides, between Harrison Street and Potrero Avenue
18th Street, south side, between Church Street and Dolores Street
20th Street, north side, between Church Street and Dolores Street
Alabama Street, both sides, between 19th Street and 20th Street
Dolores Street, west side, between 18th Street and 20th Street
Harrison Street, both sides, between 16th Street and 18th Street
Florida Street, both sides, between 16th Street and 20th Street
Folsom Street, east side, between 15th Street and 16th Street
Treat Avenue, both sides, between 16th Street and 18th Street

C. Haight/Panhandle Neighborhoods
Baker Street, west side, between Fell Street and Oak Street
Fell Street, south side, between Baker Street and Stanyan Street
Oak Street, north side, between Baker Street and Stanyan Street

D. Potrero Hill Area
15th Street, both sides, between Vermont Street and San Bruno Avenue
17th Street, both sides, between Mississippi Street and De Haro Street
Alameda Street, both sides, between Bryant Street and Vermont Street
Arkansas Street, both sides, between 16th Street and Mariposa Street
Carolina Street, both sides, between 16th Street and Mariposa Street
Connecticut Street, both sides, between 16th Street and 17tStreet
Division Street, both sides, between 9th Street and Dore Street
Mariposa St, north side, between Carolina and Arkansas Street
Missouri Street, both sides, between 16th Street and Mariposa Street
San Bruno Avenue, both sides, between Mariposa and Division Street
Texas Street, both sides, between 17th Street and Mariposa Street
Wisconsin Street, both sides, between 16th Street and 17th Street

E. Bernal Heights
Appleton Avenue, north side, between Holly Park Circle and Patton Street
Elsie Street, west side, between Holly Park Circle and Santa Marina Street
Holly Park Circle, park side (park perimeter)

F. Western Addition
Post Street, north side, between Scott Street and Steiner Street

G. Excelsior / Outer Mission
Alemany Boulevard, east side, between Onondaga Avenue and Seneca Avenue
Alemany Boulevard, both sides, between Naglee Avenue and Lawrence Avenue
Edinburgh Street, west side, between Persia Avenue and Russia Avenue
Geneva Avenue, north side, between Moscow Street and Brookdale Avenue
Madrid Street, east side, between Persia Avenue and Russia Avenue
Moscow Street, east side, between France Avenue and Geneva Avenue
Russia Avenue, north side, between Edinburg Avenue and Madrid Avenue

H. Richmond
Clement Street, north side, between 33rd Avenue and 45th Avenue
Clement Street, south side, between 36th Avenue and 38th Avenue

I. Southeast / Dogpatch
Illinois Street, both sides, between 16th Street and 24th Street
Innes Avenue, both sides, between Arelious Walker Drive and Donahue Street
Minnesota Street, both sides, between 23rd Street and 25th Street
Tennessee Street, both sides, between Tubbs Street and 25th Street
19th Street, both sides, between Indiana Street and 3rd St
23rd Street, both sides, between Indiana Street and 3rd Street
24th Street, both sides, between Minnesota Street and eastern terminus (Warm Water
Cove)

News from SEIU 1021 About the BART and City of Oakland Strike of July 1, 2013 – “Expected to Stall Bay Area Today”

Monday, July 1st, 2013

“***MEDIA ADVISORY FOR MONDAY, JULY 1, 2013***

CONTACT:  Anna Bakalis, SEIU 1021 (510) 387-5341 for City of OaklandCecille Isidro, SEIU 1021, (510) 289-8767 for BART in OaklandCarlos Rivera, SEIU 1021, (415) 260-7134 for BART in San Francisco

    SEIU 1021 Strike Expected to Stall Bay Area Today

 – More than 5,000 City of Oakland and BART Employees are expected to strike throughout the day. Workers will set up picket lines at 1 Frank Ogawa Plaza in front of Oakland City Hall at 7 AM.

WHO:            City of Oakland and BART workers officially go on strike, starting midnight July 1. Community supporters, elected officials and labor allies, join workers at the picket lines.

WHAT:            Workers, represented by SEIU Local 1021, are protesting unfair labor practices and demand greater investment in critical public services. The separate contracts for the City of Oakland and BART expired at midnight, June 30.

A press tent on Frank Ogawa Plaza with electricity and WiFi will be set up for media, starting at 7 AM. 

WHAT:            Mass Strike Begins

WHEN:            7 AM Monday, July 1

WHERE:          Oakland City Hall, 1 Frank Ogawa Plaza

VISUALS:         Workers picketing, chanting in front of City Hall, near the 12th St BART station

Interviews with workers for the City of Oakland and BART are available at Frank Ogawa Plaza all day.

The following are key press conferences throughout the day in Oakland and SF:

4:30 AM – Civic Center BART Station-UN Plaza in San Francisco

7 AM– Frank Ogawa Plaza in Oakland

12 Noon – Frank Ogawa Plaza in Oakland/Community and Labor Solidarity Rally

5 PM – Civic Center BART Station-UN Plaza in San Francisco

7:30 PM – Frank Ogawa Plaza in Oakland. Press announcement regarding strike 

FOR ONGOING AND UPDATED STRIKE INFORMATION, GO TO WWW.SEIU1021.ORG

This Line on Market Proves that Assassin’s Creed III is the Best “Historical Action-Adventure Open-World Stealth” Game Ever?

Tuesday, October 30th, 2012

Eagerly awaiting the midnight arrival of Assassin’s Creed III, amidst all the “For Lease” signs at Fourth and Market:

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OMG, the New Nintendo Wii U is Here, the New Nintendo Wii U is Here! iPhone-ish Lines at Midnight

Tuesday, September 18th, 2012

This was the crowd at the 800 Market Game Stop near Stockton and Fourth last night as the midnight hour approached:

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This new Nintendo Wii U is news to me.

Check it:

Market Street Update: LITTLE WOOD ETTE, Open ‘Til Midnight, ATM

Thursday, February 2nd, 2012

See?

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True Harry Potter Fans Won’t Just Watch Tonight’s Midnight Showings, They’ll Also Catch the 3:30 AM Screening at Metreon

Thursday, July 14th, 2011

‘Cause, I don’t know, you’d have to be barking mad to stay up all night watching the final Harry Potter flick on Opening Day.

Thusly:

Remember, It All Ends July 15th!

You Ought to Go See Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” Film

Friday, May 27th, 2011

I know, you don’t like Woody Allen movies. But this one is his best since I don’t when.

What can I say, the Tomatometer is off the hook.

The San Francisco Film Society Wants to “Save the Clay Theatre,” For Itself

Friday, August 20th, 2010

Well, it turns out that the San Francisco Film Society has a plan to Save the Clay Theatre. And why not?

Back in the day, they tried to take over the moribund Presidio Main Post Theatre (the one in the Presidio and not that other Presidio Theatre), but that didn’t work out. Or rather, it hasn’t yet worked out.

Anyway, read a letter from SFFS Executive Director Graham Leggat about what you can do to help, if you want.

All the deets, below.

Via revger, click to expand

These kids from the Bawdy Caste will return for one last Rocky Horror at the Clay the night of August 29th, no matter what.

Via Ashley

Here it is:

DEAR CLAY THEATER SUPPORTER:

The San Francisco Film Society is one of the top twenty organizations of its kind in the world, one of the top ten in the United States, and oldest, biggest and most widely respected film exhibition organization in Northern California. Since 1957, the Film Society has been enriching the lives of Bay Area residents by presenting the best film and media from around the world, notably via the acclaimed San Francisco International Film Festival. The longest-running festival in the Americas, the International celebrated its golden anniversary in April 2007. During its first half-century, the Film Society has hosted more than 2,000 filmmakers and presented more than 6,500 films from 124 countries to audiences numbering more than two million people. It is beloved by its audiences and the international film industry alike. Its contributions to the cultural life of the Bay Area are immeasurable.

Now, as the Film Society begins its 54th year of operation, it is looking ahead to an even brighter future. In recent years the organization has launched many new activities, resulting in significant increases in membership, attendance, sponsorship and earned income. Its numbers are up across the board, in fact, and it is well on its way to establishing itself as a major cultural institution with a vibrant year-round presence. Central to this mission is the acquisition of a theater that the Film Society can call its home, one in which it can present many types of year-round programming in the areas of film exhibition, education, and filmmaker services.

Since December 2009, the Film Society has been in negotiations with the landlord of the Clay Theater, in an attempt to lease or purchase the building. So far these talks are at  an impasse over terms, but ultimately the Film Society hopes to bring the negotiations to a successful and swift conclusion, resulting in a longterm lease or ownership of the Clay. Once the Film Society has the theater, it intends to significantly upgrade the physical plant, which needs a good number of improvements, and reopen it as a revitalized cultural and community hub for the thriving Upper Fillmore business district.

With a half-century of film-exhibition experience under its belt, there is no doubt that the Film Society can make a success of running the Clay. The organization will program the same eclectic and popular mix of international, independent, and documentary films that have so engaged its diverse audiences. It will also program “Landmark”-type films, meaning first-run arthouse hits, as they become available, and will present a number of mini-festivals devoted to individual filmmakers and national cinemas. In all cases the Film Society will add value to these screenings, with panels, talks, and filmmakers in attendance.

So, we urge you, as someone who attends the Clay Theater, appreciates its role in your cultural life, and wants it to continue showing great films in our neighborhood, to ask the landlord to resume negotiations with the Film Society, to come to terms with the realities of today’s recessionary marketplace and real-estate values, and make it possible for the Film Society to operate and bring renewed energy to our beloved Clay Theater. 

When you send a letter to the Clay Theater landlord, please also email a copy of your letter to the San Francisco Film Society at: rsills@sffs.org                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          

Thank you for your efforts to make it possible to “Save the Clay”!  – Graham Leggat, Executive Director of the SFFS

Sample letter below.  Please send it to the Clay Theater’s landlord:

 

Balgobind Jaiswal c/o Blu, 2259 Fillmore Street, San Francisco, California, 94115

DEAR MR. JAISWAL:

AS A CLAY THEATER  CUSTOMER, I WAS ALARMED TO HEAR THAT OUR BELOVED NEIGHBORHOOD THEATER IS TO CLOSE ON AUGUST 29.  I VALUE THE CLAY THEATER AS A UNIQUE AND IRREPLACEABLE COMMUNITY INSTITUTION AND WANT TO SEE IT CONTINUE TO PRESENT WONDERFUL FILMS IN A GREAT NEIGHBORHOOD SETTING, AS IT HAS DONE FOR THE PAST 100 YEARS.  PLEASE RESUME NEGOTIATIONS WITH THE SAN FRANCISCO FILM SOCIETY TO MAKE IT POSSIBLE FOR THE SFFS TO OPERATE AND BRING RENEWED ENERGY TO THE CLAY THEATER.  CLAY THEATER PATRONS AND ALL OF SAN FRANCISCO’S FILM COMMUNITY WOULD BE ETERNALLY GRATEFUL IF YOU WOULD MAKE THIS POSSIBLE.  THANK YOU!

SIGNED______________________________________________________

PRINT NAME__________________________________________________

ADDRESS____________________________________________________

EMAIL ADDRESS______________________________________________

TELEPHONE NUMBER_________________________________________

R.I.P. Clay Theatre on Fillmore, 1910-2010 – Rocky Horror Picture Show on Final Night, August 28th

Monday, August 16th, 2010

News comes from Sam Singer that Landmark Theatres’s popular Clay Theatre at 2261 Fillmore will go dark by the end of the month. Get all the deets from SF Silent Movie(!) Examiner Thomas Gladysz.

Per the New Fillmore:

“The final film scheduled at the Clay is a midnight showing of “The Rocky Horror Picture Show” on Saturday, August 28.”

Be afraid, be very afraid.

Well, it was nice while it lasted, but now it’s gone:

Via revger, click to expand

The Horror of red-eye – will these kids from the Bawdy Caste return for the last Rocky at the Clay? We Can Only Hope.

Via Ashley

Sic transit gloria San Francisco.

Vaya con Gaia, tiny Clay Theatre.

“Come join us for one last The Rocky Horror Picture Show with the Bawdy Caste live on stage at The CLAY THEATRE,

It’s with heavy hearts we announce that THE CLAY THEATRE will be closing at the end of August. Join us in celebrating and saying goodbye to this historic theatre with one of our favorite movies! 100 Years of film history comes to a end, help us make this one amazing evening!

The Last
ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW
with the BAWDY CASTE LIVE ON STAGE!
Saturday August 28th at MIDNIGHT

THE HISTORIC CLAY THEATRE
2261 Fillmore St
San Francisco
Tickets just $9.50-
Doors at 11:30pm Show at MIDNIGHT!
Need more info call us! (415)561-9921
Rocky will be moving to The BRIDGE THEATRE! in September!”

“One Screen. Built in 1910. Operated by Landmark since 1991. The mighty Clay is one of the oldest theatres in San Francisco. Built in 1910 by the renown Naify brothers, builders of the first movie screen in town, the New Fillmore, the Clay was first a nickelodeon house. In April of 1935, Herbert Rosenerreopened the Clay as The Clay International, a foreign film showcase. In the early 1970s, the theatre was part of the Surf Theatres group, run by pioneering San Francisco film exhibitor Mel Novikoff. In 1972, the Clay hosted the first midnight movie in San Francisco with the premiere of John Water’s Pink Flamingos, and also hosted many other controversial films, including The Life of Brian.Since Landmark assumed management in 1991, the Clay has enjoyed such improvements as digital sound, new seats and an extensive refurbishment of its art deco and classic Greek accoutrements. The combination of classic appointments and modern amenities has helped keep the Clay a comfortable, laid-back place to see unique film programming for almost a century.”