Posts Tagged ‘mobile billboards’

Official San Francisco Despises These “Rolling Billboard” Trucks, But Can’t Prevent Them From Circling and Circling

Thursday, December 5th, 2013

Especially in SoMA during convention time.

Why? Because of The Constitution. Or a constitution. Or one of them. Or both. (If a Scott Wiener-type really worked on this issue, it might have an effect, IDK.)

And oh yeah, these trucks all have Nevada license plates, ever more insulation from the long arm of SFGov

Click to expand

Look for more of these trucks during next month’s “March of Life” 2014 on the Embarcadero

“We would circle and we’d circle and we’d circle to stop and consider and centered on the pavement stacked up all the trucks jacked up and our wheels in slush and orange crush in pocket and all this here county, hell, any county, it’s just like heaven here, and I was remembering and I was just in a different county and all then this whirlybird that I headed for I had my goggles pulled off; I knew it all, I knew every back road and every truck stop…”

Those Mobile Billboard Trucks are Back on Market Street – Clogging Traffic, Blocking the Box – Why Your MUNI Bus is Slow

Wednesday, September 19th, 2012

I don’t know, if I wanted to create gridlock in SoMA / Financial / Union Square, I think I’d hire some jackasses to drive “mobile billboards” around the block and around the block all day long. 

“Blocking the box” yesterday with a mobile billboard truck in the middle of the intersection of 3rd Street and Market:

“Hey everybody! Stop everything and look at me!”

Reverse angle – now the driver is only blocking one lane of 3rd Street:

Note the Washington state license plates.

And here’s the result of the advertising trucks. Gridlock:

Oh well.

“Blocking the box” is illegal these days, but the SFPD doesn’t really hand out tickets for that, so have at it.

Now I’ll tell you, Lyft taxi, a service that you just might like, isn’t legal, but mobile billboards, a “service” that you don’t like, are legal, more or less.

Isn’t it ironic?

Don’t cha think?

I’m just sayin’

San Francisco Rolling Billboards Run Amok – But They All Have Expired Nevada License Plates, Why’s That?

Wednesday, January 26th, 2011

Learn all about San Francisco’s mobile billboards right here.

O.K. then. Now, this anti-abortion advertising truck from Nevada was illegally parked on Market Street back when a huge crowd of 16,000 or  so marched up the Embarcadero.

Of course, the SFPD or a meter maid could give this Do It Outdoors” a ticket but what good would that do?

Is this how Do It Outdoors does bidness, with unregistered Nevada plates?

Click to expand

Looks that way.

How San Francisco Could, If It Wanted To, Stop Those Anti-Abortion Advertising Trucks

Monday, January 25th, 2010

The anti-abortion mobile billboard trucks seen below, in town for Saturday’s West Coast Walk for Life, could be banned from the Streets of San Francisco, IMO. Here’s how to do it:

Step One: Amend San Francisco Police Code section 680 to make it look more like the City of West Hollywood’s Municipal Code section 11.441. Basically, that would mean, instead of banning “commercial advertising” on vehicles, we’d be banning all advertising, banning all mobile billboards.

Step Two: Start writing tickets.

What’s that you say, what about the First Amendment ‘n stuff? Well, let’s read up on a recent case from the California Court of Appeal called Showing Animals Respect and Kindness, et al. v. City of West Hollywood (B201721). You see, this animal-loving guy from S.H.A.R.K. got busted for driving his animal-rights mobile billboard advertising truck around town. He sued West Hollywood after he got cited but he lost. Why?  

Here Come Da Judges (the bulk of them, anyway):

“The city concedes that SHARK was engaged in noncommercial speech but maintains its ordinance applies to both commercial and noncommercial speech. SHARK, however, argues that the term “advertising” applies only to commercial speech. We agree with the city that the ordinance applies to both commercial and noncommercial speech.

“The term “advertise” is not limited to calling the public’s attention to a product or a business. The definition of “advertise” is more general: “to make something known to[;] . . . to make publicly and generally known[;] . . . to announce publicly esp[ecially] by a printed notice or a broadcast…”

So it looks like West Hollywood has a green light to stop both commercial and non-commercial advertising trucks from roaming its streets. What’s preventing San Francisco from doing the same thing?

Click to expand. On the Embarcadero:

And Market Street:

Just asking.

(Brace yourselves, more these trucks like these are on their way. Get used to it…)

How West Hollywood does it, after the jump

(more…)

Anti-Abortion Advertising Trucks Now Roaming the Streets of San Francisco

Saturday, January 23rd, 2010

These mobile billboard trucks, in town for today’s West Coast Walk for Life, don’t appear to constitute “commercial advertising” so the people responsible for them don’t appear to be violating San Francisco law.

Click to expand. On the Embarcadero:

And Market Street:

Anyway, this is what’s roaming the streets today…

The Mobile Billboards of San Francisco – Are They Illegal or Not?

Tuesday, January 5th, 2010

Work with me here – mobile billboards, you know, those trucks that are basically giant rectangular ads, are banned in San Francisco under Section 680 of the Police Code and yet you can see them all over town.

What gives?

Click to expand:

Maybe San Francisco has given up enforcing this regulation? Let’s see what the New York Times had to say back ten years ago:

“Similar disputes are occurring in Boston and in San Francisco, which suspended enforcement of its ban on mobile billboards in June because of a lawsuit, said Nathan Ballard, a deputy city attorney there. But San Francisco recently revised its law to explain the rationale behind it (to cut traffic congestion, truck emissions and assaults on citizens’ aesthetic sensibilities). Unless the billboard company succeeds in persuading a judge to issue a preliminary injunction by Dec. 1, he said, San Francisco will resume enforcing its billboard ban.”

(Nate Ballard was a San Francisco deputy city attorney? Did not know that.) Anywho, it could be that constitutional concerns prevent San Francisco from doing anything about mobile billboards.

Oh well.

That’s just my guess – maybe you can find a loophole here. Enjoy:

SEC. 680. ADVERTISING VEHICLES PROHIBITED ON CITY STREETS.

(a) Findings and Purpose. The inherent primary purpose of commercial advertising vehicles is to display commercial advertising on public streets. By their nature, commercial advertising vehicles are intended to distract, and aim to capture and hold the attention of, members of the public on or adjoining public streets, including drivers, pedestrians, bicyclists, and others. Moreover, such vehicles display commercial advertising from a mobile platform, including while the vehicle is moving within the flow of traffic, potentially stopping, starting, or turning abruptly, accentuating the inherent tendency of such advertising to seize attention and to distract. Additionally, the use of motor vehicles to display commercial advertising creates exhaust emissions. For these reasons, the Board of Supervisors finds that commercial advertising vehicles create aesthetic blight and visual clutter and create potential and actual traffic and health and safety hazards. The purposes of this section are (1) to promote the public health, safety and welfare of motorists, pedestrians, bicyclists, and others using the City’s public streets and roadways and adjoining areas, by eliminating the aesthetic blight and visual clutter and traffic and safety hazards caused by the operation of commercial advertising vehicles on the City’s streets; (2) to reduce congestion on the City’s streets; (3) to reduce exhaust emissions, by eliminating as an emissions source a type of commercial advertising display whose use may require continuous or extensive operation of motor vehicle engines; (4) to protect public investment in and the character and dignity of the City’s streets; and (5) to aid in the attraction of tourists and other visitors who are so important to the economy of the City. This section is not intended to regulate any non-commercial speech, including non-commercial advertising or signage.

(b) Prohibition. No person may operate any commercial advertising vehicle in or on any public street in the City and County of San Francisco.

(c) Definitions. As used in this Section, the following terms shall have the following meanings:

(1) “City” means the City and County of San Francisco.

(2) “Commercial advertising vehicle” means a motor vehicle that is carrying, towing, or otherwise displaying any commercial advertising sign, unless the vehicle is used primarily to transport passengers or goods.

(3) “Commercial advertising sign” means a banner, placard, poster, card, picture, sign or display that does no more than propose a commercial transaction.

(d) Enforcement.

(1) The Police Department shall issue a written notice of violation concerning, and requiring the immediate correction of, any violation of this Section to the driver of any commercial advertising vehicle that is being driven or used in violation of this Section, as well as to the owner or other person responsible for the vehicle, if the identity of that owner or other person is known or readily ascertainable. If issued to the driver of a commercial advertising vehicle, the notice shall require the driver to inform the owner or other person responsible for the operation of the commercial advertising vehicle of the notice and of the violation to which it relates. Notice to the driver of a commercial advertising vehicle under this subsection shall be deemed notice to the owner or other person responsible for the operation of the vehicle.

(2) The City Attorney is authorized to enforce this Section by appropriate civil action. No such action shall be commenced against any person unless and until the Police Department has issued a notice of violation requiring correction to that person, as specified above, and that person has failed to comply with this Section and with that notice. In any civil action brought to enforce this Section, the City Attorney may pursue the remedies set forth in this Section for the violation of this Section that is subject of the notice, as well as for any subsequent violations of this Section that have occurred within one year after the issuance of the notice without regard to whether the Police Department issued subsequent notices concerning those subsequent violations.

(3) Violation of this Section shall constitute grounds for injunctive relief. In addition, any person who violates or refuses to comply with the provisions of this Section shall be liable for a civil penalty which shall be assessed and recovered in a civil action brought in the name of the People of the City and County of San Francisco in any court of competent jurisdiction. Each separate display of commercial advertising prohibited by this Section, and each day that a violation of this Section is committed or permitted to continue, shall constitute a separate violation. The amount of such civil penalty shall be $250 for the first violation, $350 for the second violation, and $500 for each subsequent violation of this Section. Any penalty assessed and recovered in an action brought pursuant to this paragraph shall be paid to the Treasurer of the City and County of San Francisco. The person against whom a penalty is assessed, or against whom an injunction is obtained, also shall be liable for the costs and attorney’s fees incurred by the City and County of San Francisco in bringing any civil action to enforce the provisions of this Section.

(4) Violation of this Section shall not constitute a criminal offense.

(5) In any action brought to enforce this Section, the City Attorney may also seek any remedies available under state or federal law.

(Added by Ord. 70-92, App. 3/4/92; amended by Ord. 234-00, File No. 001261, App. 10/13/00)

Just How Many Giant Advertising Trucks Are Circling Around SoMA These Days?

Tuesday, October 27th, 2009

You know, it used to be that you’d see these empty advertising trucks driving about town, you know like in the congested part of Fillmore in the Western Addition, but then they seemed to disappear from the Streets of San Francisco about a year ago.

But now, they are back, and with a vengeance. Is it possible to have four of these things on the same block in the SoMA? That’s the report I got. Here’s two recent sightings in one photo.

Fourth Street near Mission. Click to expand:

IMG_9477 copy

And leave us not forget this other truck, the one with Nevada plates (no, that doesn’t raise any issues at all!).

Is there no limit to these advertising trucks clogging Yerba Buena Gardens?

Even Las Vagas (Vegas, baby!) wants to regulate these things.