Posts Tagged ‘mondays’

And the Award for America’s Thinnest Big-City Newspaper Goes To … Today’s San Francisco Examiner, June 4, 2012

Monday, June 4th, 2012

Boy, I’ll tell you, today’s San Francisco Examiner is like really thin.

[Call and response] “HOW THIN IS IT?!”

It’s so thin that just one ad composes ten percent of it. I’m srlsy.

I don’t know, are they taking pulp out of the newsprint to save money? Sure feels that way. Today’s issue is super thin, even for an Examiner.

But at least the advertisers are better than before. So there’s no “Platinum Gas Saver” scam on page 3, like before. And the super-jumbo horoscope is gone, so that’s nice.

In their place are ads for the Dolan Law Firm (heh), and “Real Hook Ups Real Fast (Ahora en Espanol, 18+), and “ATTENTION MEN” with an offer of a “Test Dose of Medication, to prove it works* in 10 minutes”

OK fine.

But no matter.

I’ll still pick up a copy of the ‘Xam every day.

Religiously.

*Uh, are there really medical offices way up at the 1700 block of Montgomery, deep in NIMBY territory? I guess there are. And then you take the “test dose” and wait ten minutes to see how your wiener reacts while listening to the Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill? Sign me up!

Harsh: Physician of Slain BART Passenger Charles Hill Criticizes BART Police – She Will Attend OpBART III Protest

Sunday, August 28th, 2011

Jessica Lum of Mission Local has the deets on Rupa Marya, MD, who will be there at Civic Center for OpBART III – Tokyo Drift on Monday, August 29th, 2011.

Here’s here “Dear San Francisco” letter, below.

“Dear San Francisco,

I am one of your local physicians and have taken care of many different kinds of people during the past 9 years of my appointment as an internist at UCSF, where I have worked at SF General Hospital as well as at the VA and the UCSF campuses. San Francisco is a surprisingly small town, and when you spend enough time in the health care industry, you come to recognize many of the city’s residents. You hold their stories and watch over them, in the hospital when they are ill and in the chance occurrences of running into them on the streets, in the market or painting the town red. It is an honor and great privilege to take care of the people of this city that I love so dearly.

Last month, I learned that one of my former patients Charles Hill was shot and killed by BART police. Per the police, he was armed with a bottle and a knife and had menacing behavior. Per eye witnesses, he was altered and appeared to be intoxicated but did not represent a lethal danger. I remember Charles vividly, having taken care of him several times in the revolving door which is the health care system for the people who do not fit neatly into society. Charles was a member of the invisible class of people in SF–mentally ill, homeless and not reliably connected to the help he needed. While I had seen him agitated before and while I can’t speak to all of his behavior, I never would have described him as threatening in such a way as to warrant the use of deadly force. We often have to deal with agitated sometimes even violent patients in the hospital. Through teamwork, tools and training, we have not had to fatally wound our patients in order to subdue them. I understand the police are there to protect us and react to the situation around them, but I wonder why the officer who shot Charles did not aim for the leg if he felt the need to use a gun, instead of his vital organs. I wonder if he possessed other training methods to subdue an agitated man with a knife or bottle.

I feel this situation quite deeply. It is hard to watch our civil servants (police) brutally handle a person and their body when i spend my time and energy as a civil servant (physician) honoring the dignity of that person, regardless of their race or social class, their beliefs or their affiliations. I know it is not my job–nor the police’s job—to mete out justice or judgment of a person’s worthiness. It is also hard because Charles has no voice, no one to speak for him now that he is gone. It would be easy to let this slide and move on with our busy lives, as we all struggle to make ends meet in this expensive city during a recession. I believe this situation shows us how powerless we all feel to some degree.

I feel outraged and am trying to find the best ways to express it–through creative outpouring, through conversations. I would like to lend my voice to the growing protest of the BART police’s excessive use of violent force and know that weekly protests are being organized on Mondays until demands are met for BART to fully investigate the shooting of Charles Hill, disarm its police force and train them properly, as well as bringing the officer who shot him to justice. The media is portraying the annoyance of the protests to commuters more than the unbelievable horror that an innocent man was shot dead by the force that is meant to protect us. I don’t want to upset commuters or be a nuisance. I would like to be part of educating and not letting this slip under the proverbial rug, in honor of Charles Hill and in order to help prevent something like this from ever happening again.

I will be present at the peaceful demonstrations on Mondays in front of the BART Civic Center station, not to prevent commuters from getting home, but to educate a population that may need to pause and think about the value a human life has and the kind of San Francisco we want to live and work in.

Thank you for your time and thoughtful consideration.

Respectfully,

Rupa Marya, MD”

The California Academy of Sciences Announces Extended Summer Hours

Wednesday, July 29th, 2009

Our CalAcademy has just announced extended hours!

So, until September 3, 2009, the California Academy of Sciences in Golden Gate Park will be open until 8:00 PM on Mondays and Tuesdays. Check all the deets below.

Are the animules friendlier during the evening? It sure seems that way:

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THE CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES ANNOUNCES EXTENDED SUMMER HOURS FROM AUGUST 3-SEPTEMBER 8, 2009

Museum to stay open until 8:00 pm every Monday and Tuesday night.

Summer nights in San Francisco just got steamier. Visitors to the California Academy of Sciences can now enjoy the four-story rainforest exhibit, the swampy alligator habitat, the mangrove lagoon, and the rest of the museum’s exhibits and shows until 8:00 pm every Monday and Tuesday from August 3 through September 8, 2009.

San Francisco residents and tourists alike can take advantage of the long summer days to visit the Academy during off-peak times for Golden Gate Park—and to catch some of the aquarium’s nocturnal animals at their most active. “We have been delighted by the strong interest that San Francisco residents and visitors have shown in the new Academy since we opened last September,” said Dr. Greg Farrington, executive director of the Academy. “These extended summer hours will help ensure that everyone who wants to visit with our penguins and zoom through our digital Universe is able to do so.”

Dr. F welcomes you:

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“Throughout the extended summer hours program, all of the Academy’s exhibits will remain open until 8:00 pm on Monday and Tuesday nights, and the planetarium and 3D theater will offer additional shows. The Academy Cafe will also remain open, giving working parents the opportunity to bring their kids to the Academy for “dinner and a museum” as a special weeknight treat.

Regular admission fees will apply for the Academy’s extended summer hours; Academy members will be admitted free of charge. Unlike the Academy’s weekly Thursday night program, NightLife, during which adults ages 21 and over can enjoy the museum from 6:00 – 10:00 pm, the Academy’s extended summer hours on Monday and Tuesday nights will be available for all ages. Tickets can be purchased at the door or in advance online at www.calacademy.org/tickets. As always, visitors who take public transportation receive a $3 discount.

On Monday, August 3, evening visitors can also choose to attend an astronomy lecture by Margaret Race from the SETI Institute. Hosted inside the Academy’s 90-foot diameter planetarium dome, the lecture will begin at 7:30 pm. During the talk, Race will describe how experts from many different disciplines contribute to searches for extraterrestrial life—and explain how the Outer Space Treaty and planetary protection policies urge “responsible exploration” when visiting other planets. Lecture tickets cost $10, and advanced purchase is recommended. Tickets can be purchased online or by calling 800-794-7576.

 The California Academy of Sciences is home to Steinhart Aquarium, Morrison Planetarium, Kimball Natural History Museum, and world-class research and education programs—all under one living roof. The new Academy, designed by award-winning architect Renzo Piano, opened to the public on September 27. Admission to the Academy is: $24.95 for adults; $19.95 for youth ages 12 to 17, Seniors ages 65+ and students with valid ID; $14.95 for children ages seven to 11; and free for children ages six and younger. The Academy is free to the public on the third Wednesday of each month. Admission fees include all exhibits and shows. Hours are 9:30 am – 5:00 pm Monday – Saturday, and 11:00 am – 5:00 pm on Sunday. The Academy is closed on Thanksgiving and Christmas. www.calacademy.org. (415) 379-8000.