Posts Tagged ‘Muni’

OMG, the 15th Annual How Weird Street Faire is Coming May 4th, 2014 – “May the Fourth Be With You!”

Thursday, April 3rd, 2014

The deets:

HOW WEIRD IN OUTER SPACE – The 15th annual How Weird Street Faire
Sunday May 4, 2014, Noon to 8pm
Howard and 2nd Streets, Downtown San Francisco, Earth, Sol, Milky Way
$10 requested donation

Ah, yesteryear:

I’m in outer space reading Frankfurt School treatises
That curl the common man into fetuses

All the deets:

“On May the Fourth, the How Weird Street Faire will fill the streets of San Francisco with a celebration unlike anything you’ve experienced before… HOW WEIRD IN OUTER SPACE! An epic journey to a place of weirdness and creativity and peace. How Weird features galactic-class music and art, dancing, performances, technology exhibits, unique vendors from across the planet, and thousands of people in colorful costumes.

You are invited to participate in the greatest street faire in the galaxy, and the start of the San Francisco festival season. Explore the furtile breeding ground for unexpected inspiration and cutting-edge innovation. Be creative at the expanding Art Alley, a vortex of varied expressions. Make new connections, and reconnect with old ones. Together, we will boldly go where no street faire has gone before.

The How Weird Street Faire showcases the full spectrum of electronic dance music styles, using advanced sound technology to fill the streets of San Francisco with the vibrations of peace and the frequencies of fun. There will be 10 stages of some of the best music, art, and sound systems in the galaxy, produced by some of the best sound collectives in the universe.

How Weird 2014 will feature dance music stages by Enchanted Forest, Muti Music, Symbiosis Gathering, Northern Nights, Opel, Opulent Temple, Pink Mammoth, SF House Music, Temple Nightclub, Space Monkeys, Pulse SF, Global Village, the boombox affair, Party Babas, Red Marines Festival, Happy Camp, Think You Can DJ Game Show, World Famous Productions, and more.

For 2014, How Weird Street Faire introduces the first National Dance Week stage, featuring dancers of every kind from every place, showcasing the diversity of terrestrial bodies in motion. There will be free dance lessons throughout the day, and a special flash mob that you can participate in. The National Dance Week stage will be next to the center intersection, and dancing will be found throughout the faire. All existence is in a complex dance of energy and vibrations, continuously moving and evolving. Dance is perhaps the best way of describing and understanding life, the cosmos, and ourselves.

Art has a way of reaching the farthest places. This year, How Weird will expand Art Alley and move it to Tehama Street. Come create at the new location, and enjoy the live and exhibited artwork and interactive Art Alley mural. Art Alley is curated by ArtIsMobilUs, a non-profit mobile public art gallery and roving arts incubator bringing art to humans everywhere.

There is a $10 requested donation at the entrances to the faire, for which you will receive a Magic Sticker. The Magic Stickers are worth hundreds of dollars in savings, and come with many free things. There will be discounts and specials at all of the vendors at the faire, and all of the faire bars. The Magic Stickers are how people can support the faire, while getting something great back in return. Check the website for all of the Magic Sticker specials.

The How Weird vendors offer many unique and creative goods for sale, including designer clothing, jewelry, art, decorations, games, and more. And there will be plenty of tasty food and drinks. This year will also feature local arts and crafts vending on Art Alley.

Costumes are required at How Weird. Come as yourself. Come as someone else. Come as something weird. Be the you you’ve always wanted to be. Space-related costumes are big this year.

The faire is open to all ages, and is handicapped accessible. The main entrance is at Howard and New Montgomery Streets, a short walk to MUNI, BART, the Transbay Terminal, and Caltrain Station. For those arriving from above, the coordinates are 37°47’12.4″ N, 122°23’53.7″ W. Join us as we journey through the cosmos in search of new and exciting experiences, expanding our perspective to the universal scale.

The How Weird Street Faire is a project of the non-profit World Peace Through Technology Organization, showing that in spite of our differences, we all dance to the same beat.

For more information visit http://HowWeird.org

Use the hashtag #hwsf to talk about the How Weird Street Faire.

And May the Fourth be with you!”

Thank you very much,

Justin Weiner

Marketing and Stage Director for How Weird

 

Big Pimping: SFMTA MUNI DPT CEO Ed Reiskin Approves of This Giant American Apparel Ad – A Lesson in Sexy

Thursday, March 27th, 2014

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Double Double Parking on Bush Street: It’s the Christian Thing To Do – Even on a Saturday – In Fact, Every Saturday

Friday, March 21st, 2014

Of these five lanes of Bush Street, the heathens park in lanes 1, 4, and 5 while the Christians dominate lane 2, and everybody else in the world gets lane 3, you know, to actually drive on.

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I cry foul.

Area Cyclist Caught Brazenly Hitching a Ride on the J Church Through Dolores Park – SFMTA Allows Bikes on _This_ Streetcar

Monday, March 17th, 2014

Via Sara Sonic:

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MUNI Bus Ad of the Week: “Discover Doctors Convieniently [sic] Located at the Intersection of Personalized and Excellent?”

Monday, March 17th, 2014

[UPDATE: Oh, and as Reader Andrew notes, "convieniently" isn't spelled proper.]

From Diggity* Health Medical Group:

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That’s funny ’cause most doctors I know are inconveniently located at the intersection of Croesus and Mammon, am I right, GF?

Anyway, this ad’s a bit wordy for a MUNI bus, IMO.

“C-”

*Giggity

A Plaintive Wail Coming from The ‘Set: “S.O.S. – Save Our N Judah Stops!”

Friday, March 14th, 2014

Apparently, all Hell will break loose if some N Judah stops are removed?

Via KatieOnViolin

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A #21 Hayes High Atop the Hayes Street Cut – If You Can’t Afford a Tunnel – If You Think Hayes is Steep Now…

Thursday, February 27th, 2014

The sidewalk shows how steep Hayes was before The Cut:

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The SFMTA’s New “Scott Street Traffic Diversion” Proposal

Wednesday, February 19th, 2014

Well the SFMTA has a new tack on Scott Street betwixt Page and Fell for this year.

So last year, the SFMTA felt that these particular blocks of Scott were filled with “high speed” drivers “speeding” through the place and the SFMTA felt that the simple four way stop intersection of Page and Scott was “confusing for everyone.” Here we go:

With intersecting bike routes and heavy vehicle volumes, this intersection  is confusing for everyone

In fact, Page and Scott is not “confusing” at all. As stated, it’s a simple four-way stop, about as comprehensible as possible. And in fact, Page and Scott does not experience “heavy vehicle volumes.”

Oh well.

But hey, if you want to say that Hayes and Scott has heavier traffic volume these days, especially during the evening drive, well, we agree on that, SFMTA. Before, this traffic would have been on Divisadero, but recent “improvements” to the DivCo have lessened the DivCo’s capacity.

Here is the result of the “improvements” to Divis:

Anyway

But now it’s 2014 and that was then and this is now. The SFMTA is articulating new rationales for doing what it wants to do. They’re contained in the Scott Street Traffic Diversion.

Let’s check it out:

Motorists who drive through a neighborhood – rather than to a local destination – can cause congestion on residential streets.

WELL GEE, I SUPPOSE THAT’S TRUE. BUT MOTORISTS WHO DRIVE TO A LOCAL DESTINATION – RATHER THAN DRIVING THROUGH – CAN CAUSE CONGESTION AS WELL, RIGHT?

The City proposes restricting traffic on Scott Street to make it more comfortable for residents, bicycle riders and pedestrians.

OK, SFMTA, WHY DON’T WE RESTRICT TRAFFIC ON _ALL_ STREETS TO MAKE _EVERYBODY_ MORE “COMFORTABLE?”

An extra-large bulb-out at Scott and Fell will require all southbound automobile traffic to turn right onto Fell Street; bicycle riders and pedestrians can continue on Scott. This will reduce Scott Street’s appeal as a cross-town route, making it a more pleasant place to walk, bike, and live.

SO YOU WANT DIVISADERO TO BE A _LESS_ “PLEASANT” PLACE?

Access will be maintained to all homes and driveways, and changes will be made to improve Divisadero Street to accommodate diverted traffic.

OH, I SEE, YOU WANT DIVIS TO HAVE MORE GREEN LIGHT TIME AND, LET’S SEE HERE, HAIGHT, PAGE, OAK, FELL, HAYES, ETC TO HAVE LESS GREEN LIGHT TIME. ISN’T THIS KIND OF A ZERO-SUM GAME? WHY SHOULD THE CITY BEND OVER BACKWARDS FOR THE RICH HOMEOWNERS OF SCOTT STREET?

Changes to Scott Street were initially requested by neighborhood residents unhappy with congestion and idling vehicles.

OK, SO WHAT ABOUT EVERY OTHER STREET IN SF? ARE YOU GOING TO POLL RESIDENTS OF ALL THE OTHER STREETS TO MEASURE THEIR “HAPPINESS?”

Restricting southbound traffic would greatly reduce this issue for several blocks both north and south of Fell Street. Residents who live on Scott between Oak and Fell would have to approach their homes from the south when driving, but would still have access to their driveways and would be able to exit the block to either the north or south.

WHY NOT THIS, SFMTA? WHY NOT SAY THAT ONLY SCOTT STREET RESIDENTS CAN PARK ON SCOTT STREET? I’LL BET THAT WOULD INCREASE THE HAPPINESS LEVEL OF THOSE MILLIONAIRES EVEN MORE. ARE YOU GOING TO DO THAT NEXT, SFMTA?

With the proposed traffic diverter, drivers would still be able to park on both sides of Scott Street on the block between Oak and Fell with a U-turn required to reach parking spaces on the west side of the street. The traffic diverter would not remove any parking spaces from Scott Street, though bulb-outs at other locations in the project area will each remove 0-3 parking spaces.

WHY DON’T YOU JUST COME OUT AND SAY HOW MANY PARKING SPACES YOU’RE GOING TO TAKE OUT, SFMTA? OH, THAT’S NOT YOUR STYLE, HUH?

Biking on Scott Street in the southbound direction will be significantly calmer, with fewer automobiles to share the road with.

FEWER BUSES TOO, RIGHT? IN FACT NO BUSES AT ALL. AND YET, HUNDREDS OF PEOPLE RIDE ON BUSES ON SCOTT THROUGH THIS SACRED AREA ON A DAILY BASIS. WHAT ABOUT THEM?

Scott Street will no longer be a convenient route for driving in the southbound direction.

BECAUSE IT WILL BE IMPOSSIBLE, RIGHT? WELL, WE AGREE ON THAT ON, ANYWAY.

For drivers with destinations within the Alamo Square or Lower Haight neighborhoods, either Divisadero or parallel neighborhood residential streets could be used.

WELL THANKS, CAPTAIN OBV!

For drivers currently using Scott Street for longer stretches, Divisadero will be improved to make it the preferred route through the area.

UH, NO IT WON’T. SIMPLY.

Driving north on Scott Street would not be restricted under the proposal, though raised crosswalks and speed humps will be added.

WHAT’S THE SPEED LIMIT ON SCOTT, SFMTA? HOW MANY PEOPLE “SPEED” ON THESE TWO BLOCKS BETWIXT PAGE AND FELL? OH NONE, ALL RIGHT. BUT YOU’LL PUT IN “SPEED” BUMPS ANYWAY, BECAUSE, BECAUSE…?

Because of improvements the SFMTA will be making to Divisadero in conjunction with this project, neighborhood streets such as Steiner, Pierce and Broderick would not be expected to receive noticeable changes in automobile traffic – in fact, some cross-town traffic on these streets may switch to Divisadero as well.

THIS IS PIE IN THE SKY. THIS IS THE SFMTA’s BIG ROCK CANDY MOUNTAIN. IF THE SFMTA WANTS TO FAVOR NORTH-SOUTH TRAFFIC OVER EAST-WEST, IT CAN, OF COURSE, BUT AT THE EXPENSE OF EAST-WEST TRAFFIC, OF COURSE. ISN’T THIS A ZERO-SUM GAME, SFMTA?

Changing the traffic signals on Divisadero Street will ensure that the increase in the number of cars using Divisadero will not slow down the 24-Divisadero, and could even improve Muni service in some stretches.

THIS IS PIE IN THE SKY. THIS IS THE SFMTA’s BIG ROCK CANDY MOUNTAIN. OH WELL. HEY SFMTA, WHY NOT CHANGE THE TRAFFIC SIGNALS ON DIVIS RIGHT NOW, IF DOING THAT WOULD BE SO GREAT? SIMPLY, DIVERTING TRAFFIC ON SCOTT WILL NOT IMPROVE BUS SERVICE. SORRY, SFMTA. SORRY TO HARSH YOUR MELLOW, SFMTA.

Massive Cowcatcher: The “New Municipal Railway Car” of 1912, As Seen in 1913 and As Seen in 2013

Thursday, February 13th, 2014

As seen in 1913, in a 101-year-old report to the Mayor of San Francisco, cowcatcher down:

As seen just last year on Market, cowcatcher up:

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“FIGURE 44— NEW MUNICIPAL RAILWAY CAR. Embodying the most advanced standards of comfortable seating arrangement, quick loading and unloading, rapid operation and safety m a “California type” prepayment car. This design conforms to the Chicago standard making it possible to save 18 inches from the width of roadways while still preserving ample passenger carrying capacity according to standards that may be properly imposed by the municipality in railway service either on its own lines or those of private companies. This car can comfortably accommodate from 80 to 90 passengers, or 105 in emergencies, without undue crowding. During the first few days of operation loads as high as 14i) passengers per car were carried.”

Happy Birthday to the “Hayes Street Cut” in Alamo Square – 100 Years Old – Less Climbing for the #21 Hayes Bus

Wednesday, February 12th, 2014

If you look at Hayes betwixt Pierce and Scott, you can see why the Hayes Street Cut exists.

And then you Google it to reveal:

“Hayes Street Cut: In order to re establish direct car service to the Hayes Street district north of the Panhandle* it is necessary to provide a lower grade between Pierce and Scott Streets And by a cut of 15 ft across the plateau at Pierce Street the maximum grade may be reduced from 14.6 to 10.9 (See Fig 72) which is within reasonable limits for electric equipment If a terraced arrangement is used with half the cut in the roadway and half in the walkway the cost for retaining walls will be considerably less than if the cut is extended full depth between property lines.”

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And here’s the San Francisco Call from 1910:

“All matters connected with the proposed Hayes street cut were put over until next week. The committee received the works board’s report that the improvement would cost the city $54,000.”

Now of course many parts of SF have been regraded over the years, but what makes the Hayes Street Cut the Hayes Street Cut is that the City accommodated the already partially-developed area. Nobody wanted to mess with private land south of Hayes. So people figured regrading the street while leaving the sidewalks mostly intact was the cheap solution. Terracing = less digging.

Here you go, the HAYES STREET PROFILE:

(I’ll note that the HSC makes the annual Bay to Breakers fun-run** easier on the competitors, as you can see.)

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, HAYES STREET CUT!

*We use the phrase NoPA these days, except that back then “north of the Panhandle” meant the area farther west, not that the real estate ladies of the 94117 would give a care about that.

**Hayes Street is NOT the highest part of the B2B course, despite what the MSM tells us every year. In fact, the highest part of the B2B is on JFK Drive at the foot of Rainbow Falls in Golden Gate Park. The More You Know…