Posts Tagged ‘museum’

2-Minute Video: The View from Hamon Tower, de Young Museum – One Lap of the 9th Floor on a Dreaded Sunny Day

Monday, March 24th, 2014

MLK Day FREE at MoAD in SoMA – San Francisco’s Museum of the African Diaspora – January 20, 2014

Monday, January 13th, 2014

All the deets:

“MLK Day Celebrations at Museum of the African Diaspora Jan. 20

Free Admission for All to Day of Art, Exhibits, Performances & Programs

SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 13, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — Celebrate the dream that unites us as one at San Francisco’s Museum of the African Diaspora (www.moadsf.org) on Monday, January 20. This is the birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and a national day of observance. To honor the Nobel Peace Prize winner’s life and bring people together, MoAD is offering free admission to the museum and all of its exhibits, performances and programs for the entire day.

“This year, I am remembering the struggle to make Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday a federal day of remembrance. I especially remember signing the mighty petition for Congress to pass the law,” said Linda Harrison, Executive Director of MoAD. MLK Day was first observed in 1986.

Normally, MoAD is closed on Monday and Tuesday. But this special Monday, the museum has put together a program that includes film, photography, poetry and musical performances that celebrate the lasting greatness of King. His life and achievements will be honored through art projects and the collaborative efforts of the community. MoAD MLK Day activities will run from 11am to 5pm on January 20, thanks to a generous donation by Lennar Urban.

MLK Day celebrations start on the sidewalk with Jamie Treacy’s chalk art from 1-3pm. On the second floor is a film screening and discussion on Brooklyn’s Castle from 11:30am to 1:30pm. It then moves to spoken word and poetry performances from 2-3pm by Young, Gifted and Talented from Oakland. Freedom stories will be shared by the Bay Area Veterans of the Civil Rights Movement through poetry, photos and music from 3:30-4:30pm.

On the third floor, an art project will take place from 11am to 4pm with a scavenger hunt at 11am to 5pm. Films about King, his life, struggle and successes, will be shown in the Wells Fargo Heritage Center from 11am to 4pm.

About MoAD

Since 2005, the Museum of the African Diaspora showcases the history, art and cultural richness that resulted from the dispersal of Africans throughout the world, with innovative and engaging exhibitions, education and public programs. As a nonprofit organization, the museum’s operations and programs are supported by grants and contributions from public and private sources.”

Cyclists Favor Illegal Bike Racks at the de Young Museum in Golden Gate Park – Legal Racks Unused Sometimes

Tuesday, October 8th, 2013

To wit:

Click to expand

Now I’ll tell you, I tried to park my ride on those sticks in the background but got told that that area needs to be kept clear due to fire regulations or whatnot.

The artistic spiral you see in the foreground is what you’re supposed to use. But as you can see, sometimes people don’t use it at all.

Oh well.

So-Called INTERNATIONAL ART MUSEUM OF AMERICA Now Has Free Admission for All of 2013 – When Will You Visit?

Tuesday, August 6th, 2013

Here it is, in the Twitterloin.

All the deets.

Click to expand

Now let’s see some reviews:

Kevin C:

This was the strangest “museum” I’ve ever been to.  And really, it’s worth a visit if you go on a free day.  As other reviewers have mentioned, it should really be categorized as a gallery because most of the pieces are done by one man.  The placards are hilarious.  Instead of saying “Tiger in bamboo – Oil on canvas – 1993″, it will say something like “The Master has expertly crafted this piece and is the best work to have ever captured the grace of this animal.  His Holiness has magnificent talent….”.  It’s like a paragraph about how great he is without any mention of the materials used.  I have some suggestions to make this place better.  1) call the upper floors a gallery 2) turn the ground floor forest/fireplace area into a bar 3) let people climb in the tree house.

Rupert B:

Actual artist’s note: ”The external appearance of this stone is too beautiful to be absorbed all at once … In creating this wondrous art form, H.H. Dorje Chang Buddha III has opened an entirely new epoch in the history of art in the world.” This whole shoddy enterprise seems to be one giant vanity project by a self-styled “spiritual” guru. If you do trail around this vast collection of mediocre pastiche, then at least embrace the comedy value and read the item descriptions. But make sure you don’t get waylaid by one of the dead-eyed volunteers who will ask you to describe your experience. The whiff of the cult is strong in this one.


“Art” Happens on McAllister Street – Colorful Origami Crane Birds Suddenly Appear on Our Asian Art Museum

Tuesday, July 16th, 2013

Click to expand

Oh, and Membership at the Asian Art Museum / Chong-Moon Lee Center for Asian Art and Culture is cheaper than you might think…

Awesome Bronze Japanese Guardian Lions Installed at Our Asian Art Museum – Donated by Marsha Vargas Handley

Tuesday, May 14th, 2013

I missed the big installation yesterday but KTSF was there.

Check it.

Here’s what the “South Lion” looks like.  Its left paw is “resting on a Buddhist jewel with an openwork design of sculpted peonies, a flower closely associated with lions.” DNKT.

This is a composite shot, but it’s the best one I have now. Guardian lion, 1868-1912. Japan. Bronze. Gift of Marsha Vargas Handley in memory of Raymond G. Handley 

These critters certainly have found an appropriate resting place!

The ceremonial unveiling is coming soon.

All the deets from your Asian Art Museum:

“ASIAN ART MUSEUM INSTALLS TWO JAPANESE BRONZE LIONS ON FRONT STEPS

The Asian Art Museum has installed two monumental Japanese bronze lion sculptures on granite plinths outside the museum’s front entrance on Larkin Street. Recently acquired by the museum through a donation from longtime supporter Marsha Vargas Handley in memory of Raymond G. Handley, the 800 lb. sculptures date to the late nineteenth century and are similar to the majestic guardian lions typically placed opposite each other outside Buddhist temples and Shinto shrines.

The practice of adorning public buildings with sculptures of lions is a time-honored custom in the US–the New York Public Library and the Art Institute of Chicago are noteworthy examples. The granite plinths outside the Asian Art Museum may well have been intended to support sculptures of lions when the building was originally built in 1916 to serve as the San Francisco Main Public Library. The museum is now following that longstanding tradition–this time with a uniquely Asian spin–giving a sneak peek of the treasures held inside.

The lion on the museum’s south side has its left paw resting on a Buddhist jewel, with an openwork design of sculpted peonies, a flower closely associated with lions. The south lion’s mouth is open, and the north lion’s is closed, symbolizing the sounds and spirit of the Japanese pronunciation of the first and last letters of the Sanskrit alphabet: “A” is pronounced with the mouth open, and “Un” with the mouth closed.

Physical Description: These lions’ enormous size—nearly five feet tall and six feet long— and standing positions are unusual. Paired guardian lions outside shrines today are often shown seated or crouching, and most are made of stone, wood, or, less commonly, ceramic. This pair of large sculptures also stands out in material (bronze). Relatively few bronze guardian lions from before World War II survive, due in part to mandatory metal collections ordered by the Japanese government during the war.

Conservation: The lions have undergone extensive conservation treatment, including repairs to the feet that fasten them to a new, customized base—a strategy of earthquake preparedness. Several layers of protective coating were applied to resist weathering of Ceremonial Unveiling: Details for a forthcoming ceremonial unveiling event will be announced soon.”

Presidio Update: Say Good-Bye to the Sports Basement and Hello to a New Use for the Old Commissary Building

Wednesday, March 6th, 2013

Ooh, it’s a beauty contest to see what’s going to replace the Sports Basement near Crissy Field.

I’ll tell you, the proposal from George Lucas stands out, does it not?

Check it:

He’s all, “There is a world of young people who need to be inspired” ‘n stuff.

Consider him a front-runner.

All the deets and info from the 16 contestants:

“CONCEPTS ABOUND FOR RE-USE OF PRESIDIO’S FORMER COMMISSARY BUILDING - WIDE RANGE OF PROPOSALS TO BE CONSIDERED

Presidio of San Francisco (March 5, 2013) – The Presidio Trust announced today that it has received 16 concept proposals for repurposing a stunning site on Crissy Field in the Presidio of San Francisco, a national park site and national historic landmark district just south of the Golden Gate Bridge.

“We are encouraged with the number and quality of responses and look forward to engaging the public and evaluating concepts over the coming months,” said Craig Middleton, the Trust’s executive director. “Finding a new purpose for this incomparable site clearly has stirred the imaginations of teams from around the country.”

The 16 concepts are:

OMG, They’re Here – China’s Terracotta Warriors are at Our Asian Art Museum Until May 27 – A Must See

Thursday, February 21st, 2013

This is it, this is history.

Get your tickets.

Heh:

Click to expand

Oh My, It’s Pope Benedict XVI at Fisherman’s Wharf as a Life-Sized Wax Figure

Thursday, February 21st, 2013

Via David Cruz:

Click to expand

The “International Art Museum of America” Celebrates One Year in San Francisco – Check Out Its Andersonian Crest

Tuesday, February 19th, 2013

A recent spate of fake five-star reviews has elevated our International Art Museum of America all the way up to a three star Yelp rating, so hooray for that, I guess.

And check out the crest they’re using – that’s the same one that was on the green blazers of the security guards as they ejected me from the joint on Opening Day a bit more than a year ago. Good times:

Click to expand