Posts Tagged ‘myths’

UC President Mark Yudof Throws Down: Delivers “Baker’s Dozen Myths on Higher Ed” at Cal Chamber of Commerce in SF

Tuesday, December 6th, 2011

Let’s catch up with University of California President Mark Yudof:

“On Dec. 2, UC President Mark Yudof spoke to the California Chamber of Commerce Board in San Francisco regarding misconceptions about the University of California.”

(Well, that’s the belly of the beast, that’s the Fortress of Reaction right there. Mmmm.)

Anyway, here’s his myth #8, to get you started:

“#8: Only the wealthy can afford to attend UC.

Nothing belies this myth more than the incredible socioeconomic diversity of UC students.

About 40 percent of all UC undergraduates receive Pell grants. Pell grant recipients come from families with an annual household income of $50,000 or less.

To contextualize this percentage, consider this: Four of our campuses — Berkeley, Davis, UCLA and San Diego — each enroll more Pell grant recipients than the entire Ivy League combined.”

O.K. then.

Remembering the time when TIME Magazine caught Mr. Yudof rolling up his sleeves:

Here it is:

” President: ‘Baker’s Dozen Myths on Higher Ed’
  2011-12-05

On Dec. 2, UC President Mark Yudof spoke to the California Chamber of Commerce Board in San Francisco regarding misconceptions about the University of California. The following are his prepared remarks.

“A Baker’s Dozen Myths about Higher Education”

Thank you. It’s a pleasure for me to be here this morning, and to see so many familiar faces.

You know, Mark Twain once said, “Predictions are very hard to make — especially when they deal with the future.”

Unpredictability shapes the job of every university president. And as everyone here knows, much has happened at the University of California in the last few weeks. I’d be happy to answer any questions you have about recent events during our Q&A.

Now, with apologies to David Letterman, I’ve come here today with a list. Unfortunately, it’s not very funny.

It’s a list of 13 myths about higher education.

(I should add that because I’m a big fan of Wallace Stevens, I almost called this speech “Thirteen Ways of Looking at a University.” But in deference to the language of commerce, I settled on “A Baker’s Dozen Myths about Higher Education.”)

These are the myths driving the grand narrative about universities — the grand narrative that says students are being priced out of universities like UC, while funding instead goes to new facilities or administrator salaries. So today, I’m here to dispel these myths.

#1: The cost of producing UC degrees and credit hours has gone up over the last decade.

I hear this myth all the time. And it’s frustrating, because this cost has actually dropped by more than 15 percent, in constant dollars, since the 1990s.

This cost has dropped in part due to a broad range of systemwide efficiencies: common IT systems; reduced employee travel; thousands of unfilled faculty and staff positions; one-third fewer employees at the UC Office of the President; a higher student-faculty ratio, and so on.

What has gone up, however, is the student contribution, or co-pay, to these degrees. At the same time, the state’s contribution per student has plummeted — by 60 percent in the last two decades.

To put this see-saw in perspective, UC students now cover roughly 46 percent of general fund support. But 20 years ago, their share hovered around 12 percent.

Now, sometimes I hear a variation on this myth, in the form of #2:

See the rest after the jump\

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Official CA Bed & Breakfast Myth Debunking Makes Me Want to Never Ever Visit a B&B

Monday, April 12th, 2010

Now I know what the California Association of Bed & Breakfast Inns (CABBI) is trying to do here today, but, man, I don’t know, some of the myths listed below are news to me. So the net effect  is that I’m less likely to ever set foot in a B&B.

Think I’d rather sleep in my aging Land Cruiser (diagonally, as it’s shorter than some Camry Solara  two-doors) after flopping the rear seats and popping the minivan-style rear side windows than deal with any of the B&Bs that got these myths going.

(Also, I’d like to note that not having a shared bathroom, in and of itself, does not “ensure” your safety.)

OTOH, put a kayak-in B&B on Red Rock Island, San Francisco’s northernmost piece of real estate, and I’d be up for an overnight. Red Rock is on the left and Danielle Steel’s least favoritest Bed and Breakfast is on the right behind the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge, on noisy East Brother Island in neighboring CoCo County.

(San Francisco County extends to places it really shouldn’t, don’t you know.)

Anyway, have at it.

Debunking the Top Five Myths of Bed & Breakfasts: California’s B&B Association Sets the Record Straight

SACRAMENTO, Calif., April 12 — The California Association of Bed & Breakfast Inns (CABBI) recently asked travelers if they’ve ever stayed at a bed and breakfast, and if not, why? The answers made us smile. Below is a list of the top five misconceptions we heard.  For more debunked myths about B&Bs, visit: http://www.cabbi.com/res/docs/BB_Myths_PressRelease_April2010.pdf

1) B&B decor is limited to lace doilies, paisley wallpaper, antiques, and patchwork quilts

The decor of some CABBI-member inns recall earlier eras, but increasingly more inns, such as San Francisco’s Laurel Inn in or San Diego’s Hotel Parisi are trending toward clean, sophisticated decor with modern furnishings and amenities. Even many Victorians, like the Honor Mansion in Healdsburg, feature individually decorated rooms to appeal to a variety of tastes.

2) You have to share a bathroom with other guests

The majority of CABBI-member inns offer private bathrooms. For those that don’t, most–like the Hotel Charlotte near Yosemite National Park–have policies of only renting rooms with shared bathrooms to families and couples traveling together to ensure the safety and comfort of guests.

3) You have to eat breakfast with total strangers and eat whatever the innkeeper prepares that morning

The Elk Cove Inn & Spa in Elk offers guests many choices for breakfast.  Guests can choose to sit at the large table if they wish to socialize, or dine at a more intimate, two-person table. The inn’s champagne brunch features 20-30 items, allowing guests to select what they want to eat.  Many inns also pride themselves on accommodating guests with special diets or food allergies.

4) You have to abide by a curfew set by the innkeeper

Curfews are one of the most common myths. At the McCaffrey House Bed & Breakfast in Twain Harte, guests have keys to the main house and guest room doors, providing guests with the flexibility to come and go as they please.

5) B&Bs are only for couples and strictly prohibit children and pets

CABBI has over 180 family-friendly inns and more than 70 pet-friendly inns in California. The Dolphin Inn in Carmel offers a family unit with two bedrooms, two bathrooms, a heated swimming pool, and breakfast delivered to your door. The Beazley House Bed & Breakfast Inn in Napa offers 11 pet-friendly rooms. Four-legged guests receive a water bowl, a treat bag, and a list of dog-friendly wineries and restaurants. To search for more family-friendly or pet-friendly inns, visit http://www.cabbi.com/search/advanced/.

Established in 1991, The California Association of Bed & Breakfast Inns (CABBI) is the largest tourism organization of its kind in California. We are a non-profit, statewide organization that is wholly dedicated to ensuring the highest quality standards in bed and breakfast accommodations. Currently, CABBI has nearly 300 members. Source: The California Association of Bed & Breakfast Inns

Can the Scrappy Little Zune HD Take on the iPod Touch and the Borg that is Apple?

Thursday, September 17th, 2009

Here it is, the Apple Borg Store at Market and Stockton in Union Square. It’s packed these days with people checking out the new iPod Touch.

See? The greeters at the door sometimes say, “We are Borg. You will be assimilated.” They know they’re not supposed to say that, but sometimes they’ll forget and say it anyway.

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But what’s this? Straight out of Seattle (by way of China) comes the new Zune HD!

Its message? “Hello from Seattle.” That’s what it says right on the left edge of this tiny little thing. See?

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First read up on “From OLED to Tegra: Five Myths of the Zune HD“ from the Apple fan-boys (you know, to get up to speed ‘n stuff) and then tune in to this blog later on to get the first impressions (like digital radio – how does that work in hilly San Francisco) of the new mp3 player from the kids at Microsoft.

It’ll be fun.