Posts Tagged ‘new zealand’

Harsh: “Hitler Reacts to Oracle Team USA’s America’s Cup Loss” – This is How the “FaceBook Generation” Rolls

Thursday, September 12th, 2013

This bit here has elements that are somewhat old and hackneyed, and yet it’s also brand new and it’s also informative:

Actual Sailors Weigh In on Christopher Caen’s Bizarre Attack on the Respected America’s Cup International Jury

Friday, September 6th, 2013

Well, I guess you have to start off with this:

Cup of Caen: Follow the Money

So that’s what I’m calling a Bizarre Attack on the Respected America’s Cup International Jury.*

(Speaking of our ill-starred America’s Cup, here’s the latest estimate on how much money we’re going to lose on it, from SF Weekly’s Joe Eskenazi.)

Of course, all the jurors are Sailors.

Is Chris Caen, son of Famous Writer Herb Caen, a Sailor? I don’t know. He sailed a bit in colledge and probably some since, but IDK.

Am I a Sailor? Nope, but oddly enough, I have more experience sailing cats around San Francisco Bay (even if you throw in his recent quid pro quo joyride on an overly-expensive, overpowered and fragile “AC72″ boat, which I don’t).

Oh, but here are some Sailors, and here’s their reaction to what you can find in the link above:

“ISAF’s been shoved in the background over a few AC cycles now. Caen’s premise is way off base. If ISAF wanted to ‘get back at’ or ‘discredit’ the EA, they’ve had a couple of cup cycles to do so.”

“Wow! That really IS tinfoil hat material, isn’t it?”

“Of course the ISAF’s trying to elbow the ACEA out of the picture for the money. Yes, “follow the money!” Starting with the millions San Francisco taxpayers sunk into this unlucrative venture, the tens of thousands the ACEA is spending on unpopulated spectator facilities, etc, etc. Oh, and those fat broadcast contracts? Anyone else notice that the principal sponsor for the U.S. LVC coverage was ORACLE?”

“Yes, he is way, way off the mark on this one.”

I don’t know if Caen is just stupid, lazy, or deceitful, but that article is so full of fallacies and false pretense that it is embarrassing.  He mentions the Oneworld scandal of stolen design information, but then says points have never been taken away from boats in the AC in this way (Oneworld was penalized one point exactly in the same way Oracle has been penalized – two points in each round they would have gotten to including the AC…the fact they didn’t get to the AC is irrelevant as the penalty was there).  He claims ACEA is a new way of managing the cup, but it follows very similarly to the model set forth by Alinghi with ACM.”

“What a ridiculous article. All you need to do is look at the IJ members and their past to know that these are not ISAF lackeys. Guys like Bryan Willis have been involved with the AC for years and years and are not part of the whole ISAF scene. The article couldn’t be further from the truth and is a rather pathetic piece of journalism.”

With sloppy journalism like this, I suspect he could have easily been “fed the story” by someone else with an agenda. Journalism around the world aint what it used to be.”

“…conversant with things like ISAF, AC protocols, the IJ, the ACRM and the ACEA, yet he wrote as though he had a really good handle on things. He clearly did not. HuffPost should be straightened out on that fact, but not by me. Mr Caen should clearly be educated before he passes out more incorrect ,critical, information/disinformation.”

“Quite. It’s a very silly piece indeed. The assumption that it is the IJ that wanted confidentiality is risible and the conflation of the IJ with ISAF is either ignorant or mischievous. Oh and it’s not “respected mainsail trimmer Dirk de Ridder”. I’m afraid it is “formerly respected mainsail trimmer Dirk de Ridder.”

“My general feeling is I don’t expect the average person let alone viewer to have an intimate understanding of the history of the Cup, but then I also don’t expect them to write an opinion piece on the subject either.  If you are going to write such and article, and portray an opinion such as his, then you damn well better check your facts.  He had some clue as to the Oneworld case as he mentions it as a past transgression, but didn’t bother to do the research to determine what the penalty was.  My point is we shouldn’t respect an opinion that is so ill informed as the basis of his opinion is wrong.  You can’t come to an informed opinion if you are not informed.”

“I replied to his twitter link to the article yesterday that he should check his facts with regard to the OneWorld case and a similar penalty which was retweeted by the SFCitizen, but have not received a response.  I would think a respectable journalist would want to make a correction if he was ill informed.  I am not a professional journalist, but have written a few articles for sailing mags (and won two marine writers awards for them) and if I made a mistake, especially one that was important to my conclusions, I would certainly do everything in my power to correct that.”

The jury is an ACEA body hired by GGYC and Oracle in conjunction with their challenger of record/poodle and now you say they are ISAF? I hope ISAF (the real ISAF jury) goes ahead and penalize all of the perpetrators even further so that there is NO mistake who is who.”

Oh, and here’s “Bob303,” who may or may not be a Sailor:

“The penalty only doesn’t make sense if you seek a lack of sense. Oracle created the situation by which they have been penalised when they wrote the protocol for this cup cycle. It is entirely their own doing.

Their efforts to intertwine the America’s Cup World Series (AC45s) and the America’s Cup (AC72s) to attract more sponsors/viewer, plus making it a requirement for entry to the AC that teams field at least one boat in the AC45 series, clearly joined the two at the hip. That was a specific intention of the protocol they wrote. It ensured all teams conducted themselves in a sporting manner throughout the cup cycle and couldn’t get away with stuff which attracted bad PR (or worse, cheating) in the ACWS and then just say “different series guys.”

Similarly, there HAVE been instances of teams being docked points for future round in the America’s Cup. In Valencia 2007 a One World team-member was found in possession of property of Team NZ property. They were docked a point for every stage of the round robin series (3 points in all) before they even started racing.

Just saying this since the writer took a position which ignored salient details which didn’t suit the story narrative. Coutts & Oracle didn’t attempt the “different series” defence line because they knew how ironic it would haven been to attempt that given they wrote the protocol that has now seen them pinged for clear cheating according to the Jury.”

And here’s a simple lament: “Oh please.

Yep.

*Here they are, the International Jury. Remember to “follow the money” if that makes any kind of sense.

David Tillett (Australia) Chairman
A lawyer in Australia, David has been an International Judge for over 20
years and was the Chairman of the ISAF Racing Rules Committee from
2000 until 2012. He is presently a member of the ISAF Council and ISAF
Constitution Committee. He has been a juror at the 31st, 32nd and 33rd
America’s Cups as well as an Umpire at the 28th and
29th America’s Cups. He has been a Jury Member at five Olympic Games, and
Chairman in 2004, 2008 and 2012.

John Doerr (Great Britain)
A graduate Mechanical Engineer specialising in project management
and management development for the petrochemical and construction
industries. John was a dinghy World Champion in 1978 and Olympic
trialist in the Finn class in 1980 and 1984. He has been an International
Judge since 1987 and an International Umpire since 1990. He is a past
Chairman of the ISAF Race Officials Committee and currently a member of the ISAF
Racing Rules and Race Officials Committees. John was Jury Chairman and Chief
Umpire for the 29th America’s Cup and a Jury Member for the 33rd America’s Cup. He
has served on the International Jury at the last five Olympic Games.

Josje Hofland (The Netherlands)
Josje has a ‘Doctoraal’ degree in English Literature and Linguistics. She
has been an International Judge since 1992 and was an International
Umpire between 1992 and 2000. She is a past Chairman of ISAF Judges
and Umpires sub-committees and past member of the Racing Rules and
Race Officials Committee. She was a Jury member
in the 29th and 33rd America’s Cup. For the 29th America’s Cup she filled the role of
Chief Umpire in the Challenger Finals and Deputy Chief Umpire in the America’s Cup
Match. Josje has also been a member of the Jury in four Olympic Games.

Graham McKenzie (New Zealand)
Graham is a Barrister at Law and a Solicitor in New Zealand and has
extensive experience as a commercial lawyer. He holds a Masters of
Law degree from Warwick University, England and is a Notary Public. He
is a Director of companies listed on the stock exchange and unlisted
companies in the hotel, aviation and finance sector businesses. Graham
is a competing sailor in keelboats. He is a member of the ISAF
Constitution Committee. He was a member of the combined Jury and Arbitration
Panel for the 32nd America’s Cup & and member of the Jury for the 33rd America’s
Cup.

Bryan Willis (Great Britain but lives in Malaysia)
A Marine Arbitrator and a past Magistrate (judge) in the lower criminal
court in Great Britain, Bryan has been an International Umpire, and an
International judge since 1976. He was an integral member of the ISAF
Racing Rules Committee for 20 years, and has chaired the Race
Officials Committee and Race Management sub-committees. Bryan
was a Jury member and Chief Umpire in the 28th America’s Cup, Chairman of the
Jury and Chief Umpire in the 30th and 31st America’s Cups, Chairman of the
combined Jury and Arbitration Panel for the 32nd America’s Cup and member of the
Jury for the 33rd America’s Cup. He was a Jury member for the 1992 and 1996
Olympic Games and Jury Chairman of the 2000 Olympic Games and three Volvo
Ocean Races.

Cheeky Devils! EMIRATES TEAM NEW ZEALAND (ETNZ) Allows Omega Watch to Advertise “AMERICA”S CUP? NOT FOR LONG”

Friday, August 23rd, 2013

Can you believe this? This new 17-foot-tall ad from New Zealand sponsor Omega at the foot of Sansome Street is all:

“AMERICA”S CUP? NOT FOR LONG”

See? With a certified lead-free forward king post and everything:

Click to expand

So Omega is mocking Americah in Americah?

Well I never.

This is what I could find from the Google, not that you could easily find it, I’m srsly:

“AMERICA’S CUP? NOT FOR LONG. OMEGA proudly supports Emirates Team New Zealand in its campaign to re-claim sailing’s greatest trophy, the America’s Cup…”

I tell you, if my Icebreaker merino wool watch cap hadn’t cost so very very much, I’d burn it!

Absurd America’s Cup Press Release of the Day – Unpaid Attendance of Disastrous Event “Exceeds” Expectations! Rly?

Tuesday, July 30th, 2013

I’ll tell you, I’d really get into this if I didn’t have to take care of Khaleesi and Arya today and, of course, Dothraki Language Camp is just around the corner so maybe after that I’ll have more time.

I’ve only had the chance to bold the more risible aspects of this Press Release from Fantasyland. Insert your own jokes – it’s easy.

Enjoy:

“Tickets to go on sale for Louis Vuitton Cup Semi Final beginning Tuesday

On Tuesday afternoon at 3:00pm, tickets for reserved grandstand seating at the America’s Cup Village at Marina Green will go on sale for the Semi Finals of the Louis Vuitton Cup at www.americascup.com.

The Semi Final pits Italy’s Luna Rossa Challenge against Sweden’s resurgent Artemis Racing in a best-of-seven format beginning August 6.

Tickets for the Semi Final will be available in the East Grandstands and The Deck, positioned directly opposite the start line and the first mark of the racecourse where the boats approach the first turn of the race at maximum speeds near 50 mph.

It’s become clear that the America’s Cup Village at Marina Green is the place to be for the start of the races,” said Stephen Barclay, the CEO of the America’s Cup Event Authority. “These seats will provide unbeatable views of not just the start of the races, but the top two-thirds of the race course.”

Construction of the grandstands begins today.

The release of additional tickets was made possible by Sunday’s confirmation that Artemis Racing was targeting a return to racing for the Semi Final. This, after Emirates Team New Zealand elected to advance directly to the Final which set up the Semi Final pairing of Luna Rossa vs. Artemis Racing.

Tickets for the Louis Vuitton Cup Finals (Emirates Team New Zealand vs. the winner of the Semi Final) and America’s Cup Finals (ORACLE TEAM USA vs. the winner of the Louis Vuitton Cup) are already on sale.

“We’ve had great support from all the teams and it’s nice that everyone has recognized the effort our team has made to get on the water…” Artemis Racing skipper Iain Percy said on Sunday. “At the end of the process we’ll be good to get out there and race. We’re really looking forward to it.”

Ahead of Sunday’s press conference with the skippers of the three challengers, Barclay also paid tribute to the response from the public in San Francisco to the opening weeks of preliminary racing in the Louis Vuitton Cup, America’s Cup Challenger Series.

“Over these opening weeks, we’ve had nearly 175,000 visitors at America’s Cup Park (on the Embarcadero at Piers 27/29) and over 25,000 at the America’s Cup Village (at Marina Green). That’s around 200,000 for the first three weeks which exceeds our expectations,” Barclay said. “So a big thank you from us to San Francisco for the way you’ve supported the early stages of the event.”

In electing to advance directly to the Louis Vuitton Cup Final, Emirates Team New Zealand also confirmed it would put its boat into the shed for modifications immediately, meaning the team will not race Tuesday’s match against Artemis Racing.

But Luna Rossa Challenge has indicated it plans to race on Thursday, when it is expected to sail the course alone in the last race of the Louis Vuitton Cup Round Robin.

Louis Vuitton Cup Round Robin Standings

  1. Emirates Team New Zealand 9-0 – 9 points (1 race remaining)
  2. Luna Rossa Challenge 4-5 – 4 points (1 race remaining)
  3. Artemis Racing 0-8 – 0 points (2 races remaining)

News from Inside the America’s Cup: SFGov “is very unhappy with the promised financial bonanza being anything but.”

Friday, July 5th, 2013

So let’s hear from America’s Cup 2013 Safety Committee member Jim Farmer, QC [Her Majesty's Counsel learned* in the law]:

The City of San Francisco is very unhappy with the promised financial bonanza being anything but.”

Heretofore, everything that could have gone wrong with the 2013 America’s Cup has gone wrong. All we can do now is hope that no one else dies for the sake of Larry Ellison’s ego.

Oh well.

And is this America’s Cup going to be the last big thing Larry Ellison does before he dies?

Oh well.

So there’s this – it’s the kind of thing called Harsh Reality Time:

“Much of the vision, it is now apparent, has turned to custard.  Larry Ellison’s prediction that there would be a dozen or more challengers (up to 15 perhaps) looks absurd with only 3 challengers making it to the start line and one of them not yet ready to race.   The City of San Francisco is very unhappy with the promised financial bonanza being anything but.  The tragic death of Andrew Simpson when the first (and so far only) Artemis boat disintegrated as it collapsed has cast a pall over the Event from which even the spectacular speed of these boats is unlikely to clear away.

And there’s this:

“One has to hope most earnestly that there is no further disaster.  So far these boats have not yet raced in anger and that has to be the major concern.  Two boats, each sailing at over 40 knots and closing from opposing tacks at a mark at an effective combined speed of 80 knots, is not for the faint-hearted.  Getting crew down safely or out of the water from a boat that has capsized remains a serious challenge even for sailors who are well equipped, fit and trained to deal with that situation as best they can.  Fortunately, sanity prevailed with one of the Regatta Director’s safety recommendations being a prohibition on corporate guests sitting on the back of one of these racing machines.  How crazy was that idea in the first place?”

Oh, and there’s this:

“…it will be economics that will prevent the next edition of the Cup under Ellison’s control being a success.   Three challengers this time.  It is hard to see any of those challengers continuing with the same model of the Event next time.  Yes, there will be others who will be happy to do the A45 thing, as there were this time, but the question will be whether (billionaires aside) more than one or two will be able to go to the next stage – which is the America’s Cup after all.  And even the viability of the AC45 circuit must be uncertain.  The existing model of cities paying all the costs of each mini-event, including the cost of getting the 45s there, just didn’t work this time, with a number of planned events being cancelled because of lack of financial support.”

Anyway, the point is that Appointed Mayor and Willie Brown butt-boy Ed Lee knows that this venture is a big flop, but he’s afraid to say or do anything about it.

Oh well.

Monstrous Big Red, a ticking time bomb that went off a couple months ago:

*Pepe: “Wow, Papa Homer, you are so learn-ed.” Homer: “It’s pronounced “learned.’”

Here’s an Explanation of How the America’s Cup Rules are Being Changed, In The Name of Safety, to Benefit Larry Ellison

Tuesday, June 25th, 2013

“OR can quite legitimately claim that they need this change to improve the safety of their boat to acceptable levels. ETNZ/LR can quite legitimately claim that the issue is created by design choices.”

When you’re foiling a catamaran, you’re generating lift just like an airplane. The Emirates Team New Zealand yacht generates more lift with the forward element than the rear. The Oracle Racing Larry Ellison yacht does so as well but it gets a bit more lift from the rear compared with ETNZ.

So, ETNZ is more like a regular airplane with  a small tail and OR is more like this goofy thing:

Mandating a bigger tail for all comers in the name of safety is a way for the Larry Ellison America’s Cup people to gain an advantage for Larry Ellison and/or Artemis Racing, the team with the other failed design,

Let’s hear from Hump101, a poster at Sailing Anarchy:

“ETNZ have a boat that is almost entirely supported on its single main foil. The rudder provides very little lift, just control forces, which are relatively small. As speed changes, lift changes. The main foil is correspondingly adjusted, as this is allowed, so the lift remains as  required. The lift on the rudder changes, but since this force is relatively small, the change in attitude on the boat is not problematic, and the local effects of free surface and small size provide a natural limit to motions. When it goes wrong, the boat will pivot about its main foil, potentially creating a high bow down pitch angle, so they’ve included sufficient buoyancy in the bows to cope.

OR have a boat where the lift is shared between the main foil and the rudder. The amount of lift provided by the rudder is still a small proportion of the total, but the rudder lift force is large compared to the rudder control force. As speed changes, lift changes. The main foil is correspondingly adjusted, but the rudder isn’t. The change in force on the rudder is significant, and affects the attitude of the boat. A small rudder foil that is required to provide a lot of lift can only do so with a large angle of attack, so with a fixed angle, a large change in trim of the boat is required, hence poor control. When it goes wrong, the boat pivots about the rudder foil, and hence a reduced bow down pitch angle, and hence the boat can have lower volume bows to allow recovery.

I’m sure both teams have simulated both approaches. ETNZ decided that they would go for the former, at a price of bigger main foil, lower righting moment, and more aero drag, so they have better control over a wide range of speeds for a given rudder setting. OR decided on the latter as it provides a lower drag solution, but for a smaller range of speeds for a given rudder setting. Boat 1 was an extreme example of this, but boat 2 is less extreme.

However, OR have found that the range of speeds over which they have good control is too small using the maximum size of rudder foil allowed. Hence, when they are running in the narrow speed range, they look good, but as soon as this is not the case, they have large pitch angles. Using a larger rudder foil requires less boat trim to generate the change in force, and hence better control.

The problem OR face is if they were to move the main foils further aft and increase their size, they would then have a boat which, if it goes wrong, will not have enough buoyancy in the bow to recover from the large pitch angle that would occur with the bigger main foil. A potentially dangerous solution, and rebuilding the hulls is probably not feasible, since even if they had the time, the added weight is more than their program has in the bank. They aren’t allowed new hulls. Furthermore, they have made corresponding design choices with their wing that also suggest the expectation of a narrow speed range, and moving to a higher drag foil solution would present them with power issues.

I suspect that OR may have been using a larger rudder foil recently to achieve the improvements we’ve been seeing, and consequently they already know that operating with class legal rudder foils is not a safe option for them, since if they set up the small rudder foils for lighter winds, and the winds increase during a race, they will have an unacceptably high probability of pitchpoling.

As such, the move to increase allowed rudder foil size and control is a real issue for OR, as without it they will have to choose between pulling out of certain races when conditions change, or risking the boat and crew by continuing. ETNZ and LR, on the other hand, don’t have this issue, and in fact increasing the rudder foil size on their boats would not only increase drag, but also create control problems due to the size of the control force generated becoming too large. 

Hence the current dichotomy  OR can quite legitimately claim that they need this change to improve the safety of their boat to acceptable levels. ETNZ/LR can quite legitimately claim that the issue is created by design choices. Since the AC is not just a design and sailing competition, but a design, sailing, and legal competition, we’ll have to wait and see who has the best overall package.

And then, in response to a question about how the engineer knows all this:

“Because when the OR boat is in the water, its static waterline, combined with its visible hullform when on a crane, shows that the vessel CoG is well aft of the main foil location. On the ETNZ boat, this is not the case. Their main foil is about where the CoG appears to be (actually slightly forward, but not by much).

As such, the resulting moment generated by the offset between main lifting foil vector and sum of sailing force vector on OR requires the rudder foil to provide a significant lifting force, plus also to provide the dynamic positive and negative control force, whilst on ETNZ the rudder foil provide very little lift force, just the control force element.”

So that’s why this is a lot of horseshit and this could be in the near future of this attempt at an America’s Cup yachting match.

The Coked-Up Cruise Ships of San Francisco’s Pier 35 South – A Recent Bust for Cocaine Up in Fishermans Wharf

Friday, February 17th, 2012

The P&O* Cruises Aurora was just in town up near Fishermans Wharf at Pier 35 South for part of her 2012 World Cruise.

But three of the passengers on this ship got busted for blow, deets here.

Click to expand

*Peninsular and Oriental

Icebreaker, That Upscale Merino Wool Designer Where Orlando Bloom Buys His Underwear, Opens in San Francisco

Saturday, November 26th, 2011

[UPDATE – Here’s the official spiel:

“Icebreaker makes Outdoor, Running, Cycling, Travel, Kids, Underwear and Lifestyle apparel from handpicked merino wool born in the Southern Alps of New Zealand. It’s non-itch, easy to wash, lightweight, versatile, easily packable and no-stink (because merino is naturally anti-mircrobrial, you can wear it for days ow weeks without a wash).

Sustainability has been part of Icebreaker’s ethos since the start. It has strict animal welfare and farm standards, and has a traceability program (called “Baacode”) that enables people to use a unique code sewn inside their garment to trace the fiber back to the sheep stations that grew it all the way through its supply chain.”

And OMG, it’s “Ramotaur” and “Nature Girl” on the streets of SF:

Click to expand

And one last thing:

Ramotar will be appearing next weekend Friday, Saturday, Sunday, 12/2-12/4, 12pm-3pm, fliers in key SF locales, Union Square, Embarcadero, Ferry Building, etc. Also Friday and Saturday, 12/9-12/10, 12pm-3pm in the same locales.

O.K. then.]

So Icebreaker is that fashionable merino wool store from New Zealand where actor Orlando Bloom goes shopping for woolens

sometimes along with his gf, model Miranda Kerr:

Well guess what, this was the week that Icebreaker opened its first “TouchLab” store in Northern California. It’s down at 170 Post in Union Square.

See?

OMG, is that a wool chandelier?

All right, find out about the landlord, Grosvenor Americas, after the jump.

See you there!

(more…)

OMG, It’s the “Icebreaker” Pop-Up Store from New Zealand! Get “Merino Wool Adventure Apparel” Starting Nov. 21 in Union Square

Wednesday, November 9th, 2011

I know some people who have been just waiting for this kind of thing from Icebreaker, that fashion dahling of the Hahvard Business Review.

Best of all, each piece of clothing comes with its own Baacode, so ewe can trace your purchase back to the Southern Alps of New Zealand.

All the deets here, and below.

Who’ll win this one? She has the reach but his posture tells you he wants it more:

Click to expand

“Icebreaker Brings a Touch of New Zealand to the Heart of San Francisco - New Zealand merino wool apparel company’s first San Francisco store will launch November 21, prior to the grand opening of a full build-out in March 2012

Wellington, New Zealand (7 November 2011) – Icebreaker, the New Zealand company that pioneered the merino wool adventure apparel category, today announced it would “break the ice” in San Francisco with the opening of a retail store in San Francisco on November 21, 2011, just in time for the holidays. The Icebreaker store will be located at 170 Post Street, between Grant and Kearny Streets, just one block from Union Square.

San Franciscans will be in introduced to Icebreaker in two phases. The 1600 square foot location’s initial iteration will feature the complete Icebreaker line, showcasing its Outdoor, Running, Cycling, Travel, Kids, Underwear and City collections, all made from handpicked merino wool born in the Southern Alps of New Zealand.

In March 2012 the space will be fully built-out as a “TouchLab” store. A TouchLab store enables shoppers to touch Icebreaker raw merino fiber, as well as the various weights of apparel Icebreaker makes, and experience the pleasure of pure, soft, breathable merino, which offers instant warmth, coolness in the summer, is sun safe and antimicrobial and can be machine washed.

“People in San Francisco love the outdoors and have a great appreciation for nature and natural products, so this area is the perfect location for our newest TouchLab,” said Jeremy Moon, Icebreaker’s founder and CEO. “San Franciscans are our ideal customer: savvy shoppers who appreciate apparel that looks as fantastic as it performs.

“Icebreaker is perfect for the Bay Area climate. Merino wool performs beautifully anywhere, be it on the slopes of Tahoe, during a bike ride through Wine Country or on a summer evening in the city.”
Natural, sustainably produced Icebreaker merino regulates body temperature in all climates, is highly breathable to prevent the clamminess associated with synthetics, and protects wearers from the sun’s harmful rays. It’s also no stink, resisting odour and wearable for days – sometimes weeks – without washing.

Icebreaker opened its flagship TouchLab store in New York City in December 2010 and also has TouchLab stores on the West Coast in Portland, Oregon (home of its US headquarters) and Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. It also has a TouchLab in Montréal, Canada. The Icebreaker San Francisco pop-up store will be open Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m.- 8p.m., and Sundays, 11 a.m.-7 p.m., (415) 399-9615.

“New Zealand’s merinos produce a wool that has a very fine diameter, which makes it soft and breathable yet with high insulation value for warmth.”
– TIME magazine

“The thin construction leverages wool’s breathability and natural wicking properties, so you don’t suffocate when a run heats up.”
– Runner’s World

“It wicks like a champ and is as comfortable as cotton.”
– Backpacker magazine

Icebreaker Clothing
Launched in 1994, Icebreaker was the first company in the world to develop a merino fibre layering system for the outdoors. It was also the first outdoor apparel company in the world to source merino directly from growers, a system it began in 1997. The Icebreaker apparel system includes underwear, mid layer garments, outerwear, socks and accessories. There are outdoor, technical and lifestyle categories, each with its own specific fabrics and design details. Icebreaker is sold in more than 3000 stores in 43 countries.Based in Wellington, New Zealand, Icebreaker uses only pure merino handpicked from 140 high country stations in the country’s Southern Alps to create adventure clothing for women, men and kids that combines nature’s work with human technology and design. The company is committed to sustainability, ethical manufacturing and animal welfare. In 2008 the company launched “Icebreaker Baacode,” a pioneering supply chain transparency and traceability program. Each Icebreaker includes a unique Baacode, which enables customers to trace the garment online from rearing the sheep through to each stage of the supply chain process.”

Oh Hail! Bee-bee-sized Hail Assaults San Francisco – When Oh When Will the Comforting Fog Return?

Wednesday, February 16th, 2011

Look what’s falling on San Francisco this AM.

It’s hail! Newsworthy hail. (Run for the hills, Ma Barker.)

Or snow, some people call this kind of thing snow.

But not area Kiwi jodiolson. She knows the score:

“Simultaneous sun and hail in SF. In New Zealand, they call these sun showers.”

Click to expand

And here’s how it looked in the SoMA, per Bluoz

(Thank Gaia I don’t live in Chicago or someplace….)