Posts Tagged ‘new’

OK, Everybody SPEED HUMP! – What’s the Point of Our Ineffectual SFMTA’s Brand-New Ineffectual Speed Bumps?

Thursday, July 7th, 2016

So we have new speed bumps / speed bumps / speed cushions over town these days?

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First of all, SPEED HUMP. Heh. I mean, it’s like a sign people would Instagram from their visit to Australia or something. What’s wrong with speed bumps? That’s what Californians call your speed humps, I’m srsly, SFMTA.

Second of all, these new-school speed bumps I see in the Western Addition / Alamo Square Historic District and The Richmond have got to be the least effective traffic slowing / “traffic calming” installations I’ve ever encountered. Unless you’re driving around a double-parked vehicle or giving space to a bike rider, you won’t ever feel these things. See the channels on the left and right of the white arrow? That’s where your wheels go. So this appears to be make-work construction project / psychological exercise to get drivers to think a speed bump is here? Your brand-new rabbit-proof fence is too low is so bunnies simply hop over it with ease, is what I’m saying, Mate.

Third of all, oh, this IS a make-work construction project / psychological exercise. Check it: “Apply for Residential Traffic Calming.” So what’s being calmed here IRL – the tempers of area homeowners complaining to the SFMTA, it looks like?

So yes, SFMTA / SFGov, you are “doing something” and yet, you’re not really doing anything at all.

Kind of like when you all talk about Vision Zero 2024.

Hey remember back in 2013, when Mayor Ed Lee and SFGov promised to “Reduce serious and fatal pedestrian injuries by 25% by 2016?” I do. How did that work out? Oh, not at all?

SFMTA, you’re not a safety organization.

Sry.

What is the process for getting traffic calming on my street?

  • Application: Residents who are concerned about speeding on their streets are encouraged to submit applications and neighborhood petitions to initiate the process for receiving traffic calming measures. Complete applications for the 2015/2016 program are due on July 31, 2015.
  • Evaluation & Ranking: Once applications are received, SFMTA staff collect the additional data needed to determine whether an application qualifies and how severe the problem is. This includes conducting speed & traffic count and reviewing data on the number of collisions for each location. Once this data is gathered for all applications, they are ranked based primarily on speeds, traffic counts, collisions and the land use types within a short proximity to the street, which can include the presence of schools, transit stops, health care facilities and retail activity, among others.
  • Inform Applicants: Once the evaluation and ranking phase is complete, applicants will be informed of whether or not their location will receive a traffic calming project the following year.
  • Determine Project List: SFMTA staff then review each of the top locations to determine whether a speed hump would be an appropriate tool to reduce speeds at that location.  In some cases, other measures will be recommended.
  • Inform & Ballot Neighbors: Residents on accepted blocks will be contacted by the SFMTA with information about the project, and asked to vote on whether they would like traffic calming implemented on their street. Fifty percent of returned ballots must be in favor of the measure – signatures from the original application count as “yes” votes unless a “no” vote is received from the same address.
  • Design & Approval: If the neighbors vote in favor of the measure, SFMTA engineers will finalize the designs and bring the proposals through the official SFMTA public hearing process.
  • Construction: For applications submitted by July 31, 2015, speed humps and other traffic calming measures will likely be constructed in late 2016.

Abraham Lincoln Brigade (16) Takes Market – Twice as Good as the Van Buren Boys (8) – Annual Nerd Conference Continues

Tuesday, June 14th, 2016

There were warning signs:

But I wasn’t prepared. I wasn’t prepared for this gang of blackshirts headed down Market:

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I was going to flash “16” to them to show I was down, but I didn’t know how.

(Guess all it takes to form an army in Frisco is free box lunch and giveaway T-shirts. And flags. Lots o’ flags…)

It’s Apple’s World, We’re Just Living In It: Worldwide Developers Conference Runs June 13-17th in Civic Center

Monday, June 13th, 2016

Six flags over Frisco:

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As seen in Civic Center:

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WWDC is the annual Worldwide Developers Conference held by Apple in San Francisco, California. The 2016 conference will be held June 13–17. Tickets are priced at $1,599 and are being distributed through a lottery system.

North Bay Techies and an East Bay Podcaster Want Us to Abandon Frisco’s Flag – Here’s Their Progress the Past Year

Wednesday, June 8th, 2016

Uh nothing?

That’s what they’ve gotten done the past year. Nothing. So this post from June 2015 is still as relevant as ever.

Hey, were we supposed to have some competition of proposed New San Francisco Flag ideas last year, complete with an unnamed “San Francisco official” as one of the judges, you know, for color of authority? Yep. But did that actually happen? Nope.

Like, who in SFGov would do this kind of thing? Our Unpopular Mayor? IDTS. He’s got enough real problems. Well, who else? IDK. Who wants to risk reelection over something like this?

A more honest approach would be to design a super great flag what follows all the current rules and then propose it as a replacement for San Francisco’s flag. That’s a one-step process. The problem with the two-step proposal from “Roman” “Mars” and, oddly, AutoDesk is that you could very easily end up with a design what’s less popular than the current design, right?

Step 1: Dump Haterade on the current flag so much so that we start a damn fool design contest to dump the current flag in favor of some undisclosed “improved” flag. 

Step 2: Decide on a new flag that Friscans like less than the current design.

(So yeah, old flags is funny. Sometimes they get updated per the “rules” in fashion at the time they get updated – such is life.)

Anyway, I’m sorry designerly community, but sometimes new ideas are bad ideas and sometimes self-indulgent efforts to change things for the sake of change isn’t good for your fellow taxpayers / citizens. That’s my sperpective from this side of the Bay…

Ah, memories:

“Here it is: http://www.sanfranciscoflag.com/

1. First of all, that’s a nice old-tyme skyline photo you got there – what is it, pre-Cosco Busan? It’s certainly pre-One Rincon – that’s what jumps out at me. Hey, does “good design” prevent giving credit for the best element of your new website? Let’s fix that: Christian Mehlführer, AKA User: Chmehl. of Vienna, Austria. Bro goes around the world, around the wo-orld to take good photos, right? [UPDATE: Oh, I see! A credit might “mar” the simplicity of your painfully oh-so-2015 well-designed website? Well, boo hoo!]

2. The designerly name: “Roman Mars.” Mmmm…  (It detracts, it distracts, non?) Well, my name is Ares Greek – pleased to meet you!

3. Ted Talk? Strike two!

4. Driving people to an 18-minute video instead of typing out your manifesto with bullet points? Does that work? (It didn’t work on me, sorry.)

5. Already being on double-secret logo probation for supporting UC’s recent inchoate “good-design” logo/monogram/whatever effort.

So those are the comments.

In mitigation:

1. 99% Invisible is 99% good. It’s excellent, you know, generally, when it’s not taking time out to defend the Designerly Community.

2. The Bros of AutoDesk are all right as well. Just look at them maintaining focus under heavy pressure back when the Bay to Breakers fun run wasn’t completely shaped by an unholy alliance of Christian Billionaire Philip Anschutz + touchy millionaire NIMBY homeowners:

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But why would Autodesk want to kill our flag? 

I’ll tell you, our flag is bad-ass. Look what you can do with it:

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You want to talk history? Let’s talk history – see below, from the Wiki.

In closing, The Bird Is The Word. And if you succeed* in changing it significantly, I’ll work tirelessly to get it changed back. 

END OF LINE.

UPDATE:  INSIDE THE CAMPAIGN TO REDESIGN SF’S SUCK-TASTIC FLAG

“the reason people don’t use it often is kind of an obvious one: it’s not very good.” UH, NOPE! “OBVIOUS” TO YOU, PERHAPS.

“a symbol that San Franciscans tend to rally behind” UH, COULD THERE BE _OTHER_ REASONS WE DON’T “TEND TO RALLY BEHIND” ANY PARTICULAR SYMBOL?

“overhaul?” YOU MEAN _COMPLETELY REPLACE_, RIGHT?

“design community?” AHAHAHAHAHAHA! “WE FEW, WE PROUD, DESIGNERLY FEW!”

“Does it really matter if San Francisco has a better flag or not?” GOOD QUESTION. NOPE!

“San Francisco has a chance to define its values through an enduring, recognizable symbol.” MEH. BUT IF YOU WANT TO GET STARTED, HIRE A LOBBYIST TO START LOBBYING THE SUPES. IT’LL RUN YOU SOMETHING LIKE $10,000 A MONTH FOR MANY, MANY MONTHS. WELCOME TO FRISCO, OAKLANDER. P.S. HEY, GUESS WHAT – YOUR FLAG SUCKS TOO. IT VIOLATES ALL THE RULES ME AND MY CREW MADE UP. LET’S CHANGE IT NOW. TO WHAT, I DON’T KNOW, I WON’T SAY. JUST ANYTHING BUT AN OAK TREE, WHICH, YOU KNOW, HAS BEEN DONE, LIKE BY PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND AND MANY OTHERS. PLUS, IT SAYS “OAKLAND” RIGHT ON THE THING. WHAT COULD BE MORE BANAL? KELL DOMAGE!

Reader notes:

Caption from “War & Dissent: The U.S. in the Philippines, 1898-1902″ exhibit. Curated by Randolph Delehanty, Ph.D. of the Presidio Trust.

“In 1900, banker and art patron Mayor James Duval Phelan, mayor from 1897 to 1902, recommended to the Board of Supervisors that San Francisco adopt a flag and motto. Over 100 designs were submitted and John M. Gamble’s proposal was selected. It depicts a phoenix rising from its ashes on a white field. The mythological phoenix appears in many ancient cultures and is a symbol of immortality. When the long-lived phoenix feels death is near, it builds a nest of aromatic wood and sets it afire. A new phoenix then arises from the ashes, just as San Francisco arose from the great fires of the 1850s. The motto “Oro en paz y fierro en guerra” “Gold in Peace and Iron in War” refers to the city’s then-recent experience during the Spanish–American War as the embarkation point for troops to the Philippines in 1898.”

*The primary way our elites end up successfully imposing their “good design” upon San Franciscans is through turning an aesthetic issue into a health and safety** matter.

**See how that works? The high school student who hasn’t actually hurt anybody IRLAFAIK is described as one who has “hurt a lot of people.” And in this town, some who are convicted of homicides end up getting probation or something like several months in jail…

Our Sad-Sack SFMTA, a Part of the SFGov, Violates SF’s Sign Posting Rules to Advertise Itself to You

Monday, May 16th, 2016

Here are the rules you have to obey.

And now here comes our SFMTA to remind you how great the SFMTA is:

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I’ll tell you, I’m meh about this project for the 3000 feet of Masonic betwixt Fell and Geary and I’d still be meh about it even if the money earmarked came from planet Mars for free and even if all the work required could be done in just one day.

I don’t think Masonic will be “transformed.” I don’t think we’ll end up with a “new” Masonic.

I don’t think I like our SFMTA promoting itself like this…

Anyway, our SFMTA seta a bad example, but here are the rules what applies to you, Joan Q. Public:

“Tips for legally posting signs on public property

To legally place a sign on a utility pole, it must:

Be less than 11 inches in height

No higher than 12 feet from the ground

Conform to the shape of the pole

Be attached with tape or other non-adhesive material such as twine, string or other non-metal banding material

Include a legible posting date in the lower right hand corner

Be removed after 10 days, if the sign is promoting a date specific event

Be removed within 70 days of the posting date

Not be installed on historic street light poles*, traffic signal poles or traffic directional sign poles.

* Historic street light poles are on these streets:

Market Street from 1 Market to 2490 Market

Mission Street from 16th Street to 24th Street

Grant Avenue from Bush Street to Broadway Street

The Embarcadero from King Street to Jefferson Street

Lamp Posts on Fisherman’s Wharf from Hyde to Powell

Howard Street from 3rd Street to 4th Street

Lamp Posts within Union Square

Mason Street from Market to Sutter

Sutter Street from Mason to Kearny

Kearny Street from Bush to Market

SFMOMA Opening Day 2016: “NEW SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF MODERN ART NOW OPEN” – Bigger and Better

Saturday, May 14th, 2016

Here it is:

“FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: NEW SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF MODERN ART NOW OPEN – Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi and Mayor Edwin Lee Joined SFMOMA Director Neal Benezra, Board Chairman Charles Schwab and Board President Bob Fisher to Inaugurate Expanded Museum – More than 5,000 Visitors Welcomed to Museum For Free Today

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The new SFMOMA from Howard Street; photo by Devlin Shand, courtesy Drew Altizer Photography

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Charles Schwab, Robert Fisher, Neal Benezra and Nancy Pelosi, Edwin Lee and Craig Dykers; photo by Drew Altizer, courtesy Drew Altizer Photography

SAN FRANCISCO, CA (May 14, 2016)—With a blizzard of red confetti, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) opened its doors to the public today, May 14. Opening Day festivities were attended by local dignitaries, members of the Bay Area arts community and the general public. After the program, the first visitors were welcomed to the new museum by SFMOMA staff and leadership.

The program included remarks by Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi, Mayor Edwin Lee, SFMOMA Board Chairman Charles Schwab, SFMOMA Board President Bob Fisher and SFMOMA’s Helen and Charles Schwab Director Neal Benezra. The museum distributed more than 5,000 free timed tickets for Opening Day to the public. Surrounding cultural institutions including the Museum of the African Diaspora, the Contemporary Jewish Museum, the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, the Children’s Creativity Museum and many more throughout the Yerba Buena Cultural District also offered free admission and programming to celebrate the return of SFMOMA to the neighborhood.

“After years of planning and construction, it feels terrific to welcome visitors back to the museum,” said Neal Benezra. “With our goal of providing more art to more people, now and for generations to come, we are excited to share the new museum experience we have created that features the distinguished Doris and Donald Fisher Collection, new works gifted or promised to us by 230 generous donors and the Pritzker Center for Photography which deepens our commitment to the medium.”

SFMOMA, which opened today with 19 inaugural exhibitions, underwent a three-year transformation to add a 10-story expansion designed by international architecture firm Snøhetta that nearly triples its gallery space, allowing the museum to show more of its exceptional collection of modern and contemporary art. With free admission for guests ages 18 and younger and 45,000 square feet of free public space, SFMOMA is more open to the community than ever before.

“Today, with the opening of this gorgeous museum expansion, San Francisco affirms our city’s place as a global leader of art and culture,” said Congresswoman Pelosi. “The new SFMOMA is a manifestation of our city’s deep respect for creativity, and it embodies the spirit and the generosity of the entire Bay Area Community. For that, we are very proud, and very thankful indeed.”

“San Francisco is a city of big ideas, and SFMOMA is a really big idea—and now, a big reality,” said Mayor Lee. “Not only is the new SFMOMA a place to showcase innovative art, culture and education initiatives, but it is a piece of art itself in the Yerba Buena Art District. The museum is a major draw for visitors, residents, families and youth from around the world, and its contribution to the Bay Area economy will now grow significantly with its new expansion.”

SFMOMA OPENING DAY EVENTS

SFMOMA’s Opening Day began with street performers on Howard Street including entertainment by the Circus Center, SFJAZZ High School All Stars, the San Francisco Youth Ballet Ribbon Dancers and We Talk Chalk.

After remarks, at the museum’s new entrance on Howard Street, the speakers and architect Craig Dykers, founding partner of Snøhetta, ceremonially opened the museum by pressing a large red button with the new SFMOMA logo on it, releasing a blizzard of red confetti from the roof of the new museum and adjacent buildings. The Golden State Warriors Aftershock Drumline played while SFMOMA staff members in red shirts paraded with large red balloons. Ribbon dancers from the San Francisco Youth Ballet led the first visitors into the building.|

Free admission on Opening Day was made possible in part by PG&E, a partner in making the new SFMOMA a model for energy efficiency for art museums through participation in the Step Up and Power Down and Savings by Design programs, The Yerba Buena Community Benefits District and the museum’s Premier Sponsors Bank of America and Cadillac.

SFMOMA HOURS AND ADMISSION

SFMOMA is open to the public seven days a week from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. through Labor Day. Free public spaces open at 9 a.m. daily. The museum hosts extended hours on Thursdays until 9 p.m., giving visitors the opportunity to enjoy exhibitions and programs in the evening.

Annual membership begins at $100, and members enjoy unlimited free admission (with advance reservation). Adult admission to SFMOMA is $25 and admission for seniors 65 years and older is $22. Admission for visitors ages 19 through 24 is $19. SFMOMA provides free admission to all visitors 18 and younger, furthering its goal of building the next generation of art lovers.

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
151 Third Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

Founded in 1935 as the first West Coast museum devoted to modern and contemporary art, a thoroughly transformed SFMOMA features significantly enhanced gallery, education and public spaces. With six art-filled terraces, a new sculptural staircase and Roman steps where the public can gather, access to 45,000 square feet of free art-filled public space and free admission for visitors age 18 and younger, SFMOMA is more welcoming and more connected to San Francisco than ever before.

Visit sfmoma.org or call 415.357.4000 for more information.

Hey, “BAY AREA” – If You Think You Have the Best Personalized License Plate, Take a Look at This – Bonus: Yellow on Black

Monday, March 14th, 2016

Is this real life?

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So, either this is a real license plate, which would be fine, or it’s not. But if it’s not, I don’t approve…

America Still Imports Millions of Cars per Year – Here’s What It Looks Like, at the Ports of the East Bay and North Bay

Friday, January 8th, 2016

One after the other, they come and get stacked up here and other places nearby

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It’s endless

MUNI’s Answer to the CHESTNUT BULLET from CHARIOT: New Flyer Industries XT60 60-Foot Articulated Trolleybuses – Your New 30X-Marina Express

Wednesday, December 23rd, 2015

OMG, just look at this monster:

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It’s like the Mammoth Car from Speed Racer, non?

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Anyway, that one above, #7201, was just the prototype. But this one here, #7215 is the real deal, spotted last week undergoing sea trials on Mission in SoMA. Soon it will be your new 30-X Marina “(Orient) Express,” the better to do battle with Chariot’s Chestnut Bullet:

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Get all the deets from Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez

Muni set to use longer buses on popular 30X-Marina Express

(And let me say, speaking a Bro myself, I apologize to Joe on behalf of Bros everywhere for all the time he had to spend yesterday on the SFBARF crew. Imagine if renters banded together to get property owners to speak out for rent control or something – that would be pretty bizarre as well.)

But hey, look at this monster – it doesn’t even come close to fitting into the frame:

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Articulated, as most monsters are:

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Bye bye Monster Bus – see you in my nightmares:

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Actually, I approve of these gentle giants, these whale sharks of the transit world. Now it’s a shame that literally nothing can be done about rejiggering lanes to get 30’s through Stockton Street, but there was/is a corrupt bargain having to do with the less-than-useless Central Subway what prevents that. Oh well.