Posts Tagged ‘new’

Ever More “Speed Hump” Speed Bumps for Golden Gate Park – What’s the Recommended Speed for These Things?

Thursday, November 3rd, 2016

Get up to “speed” here.

Here we go – on JFK looking east towards Transverse / Crossover

7j7c3563-copy

And now close to Marx Meadow looking west – this one will be going in soon:

20161102_093204-copy

I guess this one will go almost all the way across JFK Drive:

7j7c3561-copy

And, now closer to 30th Avenue, looking east – this was the first to be installed, now with a new sign:

7j7c3558-copy

I don’t know when I’ll make it back here with a vehicle. IMO, 20 MPH or so is prolly the limit for you. (I had my decidedly non-sporty ride mistakenly set in SPORT mode, but I don’t think it makes much difference on a road regularity as big as this, but I’ll try it again sometime on my ride’s softest suspension setting.)

OTOH, if you have a brand-new BMW M4 GTS, how about 0 MPH as the limit?

And on bikes heading west, IDK. Look out, Jack, is all I can say.

I think the actual speed limit for the bumps is 25 MPH, but that seems too fast for IRL.

Our SFMTA has reported that some drivers go 32-34 MPH on this stretch of JFK and I’m sure these numbers come from someplace real, but I’m also sure whatever stat they’d report has been manipulated for their own purposes, oh well.

On It Goes…

A Brand-New “Near Term Speed Hump” Speed Bump, Installed on JFK Drive in Golden Gate Park

Tuesday, November 1st, 2016

Here it is:

20161028_121719-copy

These photos are from a few days back, and this bump / hump itself prolly was installed about ten days back. If you hit this thing at 25 + you will feel it, I promise you. My ride was practically made to handle something like this bump with aplomb, and I certainly felt it. Oh, and look, a speedometer system, of sorts:

20161028_121739-copy

Here’s the “near term” language, straight from our incompetent SFMTA.

Humps cause car deceleration without creating the noise, vibration or safety issues associated with their sharper bump cousins.

I’ll tell you, not a whole bunch of drivers go signif more than 25 MPH on the JFK, despite what SFGov might tell you, or imply, with their nonsensical “some traffic travels through JFK at 32-38 MPH type” of stat. Well, sure, some traffic. I go through at exactly 25 which requires a touch of braking on the downhillier parts like near Speedway Meadow. (Hellman Meadow? I don’t think that’ll take for a good long time.) Anyway, if you get on my rear bumper I’ll simply pull over, pretending to get ready to park, and then pull back in after you’ve passed me. But I don’t do that too often.

(If you wanted to decrease illegal “speeding” on JFK, you’d raise the limit to 30 MPH and, conversely, if you wanted to, for some reason, increase illegal speeding on JFK, you’d lower the limit to 20 MPH.)

Anyway, if you want to lower speeds on JFK, you’d put in a brace of speed bumps – that’ll work. Of course, there’d be the noise, vibration, and safety concerns of San Francisco voters, but that will get addressed later, one assumes…

And of course, a few speed bumps is nothing like this recent proposal.

And oh, down Mexico way, if a municipality want to have a nothingburger speed bumps like this, they’d hire somebody to do it one day and then it’d be done the next – it wouldn’t turn into an expensive half-year “project” with countless meetings and endless news releases…

A New Lunch Place in the Financh: TSUKIJI NO DONBURI-MONO from THE GRUBBIES – $200 for Sea Urchin and Rice?

Thursday, October 13th, 2016

I’m taking things slow here. Peasant Pies is gone from 303 Sacramento. In its place is this joint with no seating. This is a real business registered with SFGov.

TSUKIJI suggests Tokyo’s world-famous fish market. Donburi means rice bowl – rice plus something else, in this case seafood. And THE GRUBBIES means I don’t know what.

7j7c2876-copy

Now, check out the asking prices. If you want to go hog-wild, you can order UNI  plus rice for $40 to $200(!) – click on the photo to see the prices. Is this meant for more than one person? IDK. I’m not sure how many servings of sea urchin gonads plus rice you’d get. Isn’t this a lot of money for lunch? (In mitigation, you can wash down your meal with a can of soda, for just $1 more.)

20161012_114528-copy

I’m not sure if they’re suggesting the seafood is flown in from Japan or if this place is just similar to a Japanese fish market. I’ll tell you, there was a Yoshinoya fast food donburi place what tried to make a go of it about a block away from here. They served inexpensive “beef bowls,” like something a taxi driver would eat on break. They didn’t last long.

But this place is different – it’s expensive, and all seafood AFAICS. It’s not at all on social media AFAIK. It’s terra incognita, foodies!

Have at it.

How To Obstruct Traffic on the 101: By Driving the 35 MPH Speed Limit, on a Freeway

Thursday, September 15th, 2016

101 South, a 35 MPH freeway:

7J7C9911 copy

Brand-New 60-Foot Bus Climbs McAllister – The Future is Now – An Xcelsior Trolleybus (XT) in the Western Addition

Wednesday, September 7th, 2016

This one was built Just For Frisco:

7J7C1337 copy

Big, in’nt?

They Call Me MISTER Platypus! – My White Whale Spotted, Again

Friday, September 2nd, 2016

This is the closest I’ve gotten to this now-famous ride:

7J7C1286 copy

“PLATYPUS” – go figure. I don’t think Old GM had a platypus car…

Toyota Mirai Fuel-Cell-Car Spotted in the Wild

Monday, August 22nd, 2016

This is the second Toyota Mirai hydrogen car I’ve ever seen (unless it’s the first and it’s the same ride I saw inside the dealership on Geary last year):

7J7C0762 copy

Anyway, these vehicles are out on the streets of San Francisco now, that’s the update…

But Is It Art: Twitterloin’s “NEMA” Building to Unveil Snapchat-Centric “WALL OF GOOD LOOKS” at 10th and Market – FREE DONUTS!

Friday, August 19th, 2016

(From the people who brought us “AMENITIES, NOT ENEMIES.” Ah, mem’ries.)

Here it is:

Full_Wall_Mock_V2 copy

“We’re thrilled to announce the unveiling of the “Wall of Good Looks”, an interactive public art installation showcased along NEMA’s Market Street windows.  Grab your smart phones and a few friends to join us for some photo fun! To kick off the event at 8 10th Street, FREE DONUTS will be given to all who join us on Sunday, August 21st from 4-6pm! In celebration of the Wall of Good Looks debut, NEMA will also be releasing a five day sequence of custom-designed Snapchat filters starting this Sunday, 8/21, through Thursday, 8/25, from 4-6 p.m. Those who enter the specified geo-perimeter will be able to take Snapchat selfies to share with friends during this limited time.”

I’ll just note that the word “art” and its derivatives was used 11 times in this announcement.

I’ll also note that the people who work at/for the NEMA building seem to have a lot of time to spend on Yelp…

Three Things What are New the Past Decade in Frisco: Corporate Intercity Buses, Paper License Plate Abuse, and Private Taxicabs

Wednesday, August 10th, 2016

7J7C0017 copy

1. Back in aught-seven was when I first heard of corporate buses taking workers to other cities. (Or maybe it was aught-six, I forget.) Of course we had Frisco institutions shuttling workers around, owing to our horrible, horribly corrupt SFMTA / MUNI mess, but people riding the freeways for hours a day, well this was new. Anyway, in the left corner of this shot you can see the distinctive Van Hool kink at the rear window.

2. That Porsche in the middle has its license plates at home. Back a decade ago, drivers didn’t go around for months and years without plates, but these days, they do, oh well.

3. And on the right, an Uber instead of a regular taxicab.

OK, Everybody SPEED HUMP! – What’s the Point of Our Ineffectual SFMTA’s Brand-New Ineffectual Speed Bumps?

Thursday, July 7th, 2016

So we have new speed bumps / speed bumps / speed cushions over town these days?

7J7C8399 copy

First of all, SPEED HUMP. Heh. I mean, it’s like a sign people would Instagram from their visit to Australia or something. What’s wrong with speed bumps? That’s what Californians call your speed humps, I’m srsly, SFMTA.

Second of all, these new-school speed bumps I see in the Western Addition / Alamo Square Historic District and The Richmond have got to be the least effective traffic slowing / “traffic calming” installations I’ve ever encountered. Unless you’re driving around a double-parked vehicle or giving space to a bike rider, you won’t ever feel these things. See the channels on the left and right of the white arrow? That’s where your wheels go. So this appears to be make-work construction project / psychological exercise to get drivers to think a speed bump is here? Your brand-new rabbit-proof fence is too low is so bunnies simply hop over it with ease, is what I’m saying, Mate.

Third of all, oh, this IS a make-work construction project / psychological exercise. Check it: “Apply for Residential Traffic Calming.” So what’s being calmed here IRL – the tempers of area homeowners complaining to the SFMTA, it looks like?

So yes, SFMTA / SFGov, you are “doing something” and yet, you’re not really doing anything at all.

Kind of like when you all talk about Vision Zero 2024.

Hey remember back in 2013, when Mayor Ed Lee and SFGov promised to “Reduce serious and fatal pedestrian injuries by 25% by 2016?” I do. How did that work out? Oh, not at all?

SFMTA, you’re not a safety organization.

Sry.

What is the process for getting traffic calming on my street?

  • Application: Residents who are concerned about speeding on their streets are encouraged to submit applications and neighborhood petitions to initiate the process for receiving traffic calming measures. Complete applications for the 2015/2016 program are due on July 31, 2015.
  • Evaluation & Ranking: Once applications are received, SFMTA staff collect the additional data needed to determine whether an application qualifies and how severe the problem is. This includes conducting speed & traffic count and reviewing data on the number of collisions for each location. Once this data is gathered for all applications, they are ranked based primarily on speeds, traffic counts, collisions and the land use types within a short proximity to the street, which can include the presence of schools, transit stops, health care facilities and retail activity, among others.
  • Inform Applicants: Once the evaluation and ranking phase is complete, applicants will be informed of whether or not their location will receive a traffic calming project the following year.
  • Determine Project List: SFMTA staff then review each of the top locations to determine whether a speed hump would be an appropriate tool to reduce speeds at that location.  In some cases, other measures will be recommended.
  • Inform & Ballot Neighbors: Residents on accepted blocks will be contacted by the SFMTA with information about the project, and asked to vote on whether they would like traffic calming implemented on their street. Fifty percent of returned ballots must be in favor of the measure – signatures from the original application count as “yes” votes unless a “no” vote is received from the same address.
  • Design & Approval: If the neighbors vote in favor of the measure, SFMTA engineers will finalize the designs and bring the proposals through the official SFMTA public hearing process.
  • Construction: For applications submitted by July 31, 2015, speed humps and other traffic calming measures will likely be constructed in late 2016.