Posts Tagged ‘newspapers’

Racist San Francisco Pizza Delivery Map Evolution – Western Addition, Twitterloin, and Potrero are No Go – Yet It’s Legal

Tuesday, April 30th, 2013

[GRUB STREET SF has an explanation from the owner. Plus there's good news for Dogpatch! Sort of. Before 7:30 PM, anyway.]

Remember back in the day, back  more than a half-decade when a joint like Amici’s East Coast Pizzeria could get away with a delivery map like this?

Check it, the Western A and the Potrero Hill PJs were carved out of the delivery areas and the gritty “Uptown” Tenderloin / Twitterloin / 6th Street / Flank area only enjoyed daytime delivery, thusly:

And then came this map, which is a little less racist:

And oh wait, this is the current map still.

(At least the southern part of Potrero Hill isn’t carved out so blatantly these days.)

One wonders what sassy District Five Supervisor London Breed or District Six Supervisor Jane I mean, I’m just saying Kim or feisty District Ten Supervisor Malia Cohen would think about these maps.

This pizza delivery driver safety issue was the talk of the town over at Eater SF and kissing cousin Curbed SF a half-decade back. Let’s review.

Taxi drivers can’t legally refuse to take you to certain areas of San Francisco due to their concerns over personal safety. Non, non, non. That’s a crime called failure to convey that can land a cabbie in the hoosegow. Why are pizza drivers treated differently?

Because in 1996, Supervisor Willie Kennedy gave us a law, (one that became national news), but then it got watered down such that a “reasonable good faith belief” that a driver would be in danger in a particular nabe is now enough to allow the brazen publication of redlined pizza maps.

And check it, flower and newspaper delivery people are off the hook as well.

Note also that there doesn’t seem to be any designated punishment for a violation anyway. Oh well.

To review, cabbies are on the hook, delivery people not.

NB: Dominoes appears to use a different map, or maybe none at all, as it seems they’ll delivery just about anywhere in our seven square.

The More You Know…

SEC. 3305.1. HOME DELIVERY SERVICES.

(a) It shall be unlawful for any person or business entity to refuse to provide home delivery services to any residential address within the City and County of San Francisco falling within that person’s or business entity’s normal service range. A person or business entity may not set its normal service range to exclude a neighborhood or location based upon the race, color, ancestry, national origin, place of birth, sex, age, religion, creed, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, weight or height, of the residents of that neighborhood or location. Where a person or business entity regularly advertises home delivery services to the entire City and County, that person or business entity’s “normal service range” shall be defined by the geographic boundaries of the City and County.

(b) For purposes of this Section, “home delivery services” shall mean the delivery of merchandise to residential addresses, when such services are regularly advertised or provided by any person or business entity.

(c) Notwithstanding any other provision of this Section, it shall not be unlawful for a person or business entity to refuse to provide home delivery services to a residential address if (i) the occupants at that address have previously refused to pay in full for services provided to them by that person or business entity; or (ii) such refusal is necessary for the employer to comply with any applicable State or federal occupational safety and health requirements or existing union contract; or (iii) the person or business entity has a reasonable good faith belief that providing delivery services to that address would expose delivery personnel to an unreasonable risk of harm.

(Added by Ord. 217-96, App. 5/30/96; amended by Ord. 295-96, App. 7/17/96; Ord. 222-02, File No. 021462, App. 11/15/2002)

Apparently, the San Francisco Chronicle Can No Longer Afford to Pay the Rent for Willie Brown’s PedMount News Racks

Thursday, October 25th, 2012

So like the San Francisco Chronicle is cutting back on street distribution in the Financh?

Click to expand

Sure looks that way.

Or maybe just on Monty Street?

Now, is there any penalty on former Mayor Willie Brown for foisting all this short-sighted pedmount concept on the MSM and the Commonweal?

Apparently not.

Oh well.

The “before” picture here looks better to me than the “after” photo…

Newsflash: Those Stupid Green Empty Pedmount News Boxes are NOT Required by the First Amendment

Tuesday, October 4th, 2011

No, they‘re required by contract, a bad 20-year contract engineered by somewhat corrupt former Mayor Willie Brown.

Blogger Michael Petrelis is looking into these things, particularly some in the Castro –  be sure to follow along his adventure this month as he considers attending one the semi-secret meetings that DPW hosts with Clear Channel and others.

These things, which are/were a burden to small local newspapers in particular, seem to require a lot of maintenance and upkeep. Multiple crews were working simultaneously on Market Street a few weeks back:  

Click to expand

Just as the assassination of George Moscone and Harvey Milk was a case study against district elections, ridiculous 20-year contracts what tie the City’s hands are case studies against San Francisco’s Strong Mayor system.

IMO.

“News Rack Advisory Committee” – I Know What You Did _This_ Summer – Is DPW is Afraid of Michael Petrelis?

Wednesday, September 21st, 2011

Blogger Michael Petrelis has recently been nosing around the issue of those horrible green pedmount news rack monsters that the corrupt WillieBrownGavinNewsomEdLee administration loves so.

Check it.

Anyway, I’ve never met the man myself but this is an artist’s impression of what M. Petrelis looks like when he’s on the case against corruption from our City Family.  

I’d tell you the name of the movie this is from, but that would be racist,* somehow.

Anyway, Petrelis was nosing around, as he’s wont to do, and then one of DPW’s webpages evolved a bit.

So, first it was all like this:

“The NAC meets regularly to discuss policies and procedures and to make recommendations to the Director of Public Works to amend the Guidelines Regarding News Racks and other progam needs.”

 

Click to expand

That’s what it looked like yesterday.

But now it’s all like this:

“Advisory committee members are newspaper distributors and concerned citizens appointed by the Director of Public Works.The NAC meets regularly to discuss policies and procedures and to make recommendations to the Director of Public Works to amend the Guidelines Regarding News Racks and other progam needs.  Meetings are scheduled on the 2nd Tuesday of each month.”

Who’s doing what now? Were the relevant policies wrong before? Are they right now?

I know not.

Let’s hope Michael can get to the bottom of this soon.

*And then maybe, you know, to punish me, a signals intelligence officer working at the Chinese consulate near Japantown could packet sniff my cell again.**

**Now I’m not even sure about the first time. But I remember picking up some election stuff and a handcart at City Hall*** on a Friday evening, you know, using Mom’s Taxi,**** and it was the anniversary of something horrible that the backward, unelected, one-party-state that is the People’s Republic of China had done, so I figured I’d drop by Laguna on my home on Turk, check out the scene, see how many Feds are hanging about. It was boring so I sat in Mom’s taxi checking the gMail before heading out. Twelve hours later I get an email from Google telling me how I’d been hacked from somewhere in the PRC, ostensibly, on the East Coast – I checked the location on a map. That kind of thing hasn’t happened before and it hasn’t happened since. (And if somebody read my emails, I don’t really care anyway, as I haven’t ever really been in contact with the Tibetans or whomever might scheme to attack or whatever.) But, when there’s a protest going on around that consulate, you might want to consider taking the battery pack out of your mobile, just saying. Now I’m sure that the United States spies on China the same way that our Chinese Consulate on Geary conducts espionage on San Franciscans so I guess it all evens out in the great scheme of things. And maybe the hack was a coinkidink, don’t know. (China has more than a few freelance hackers, of course.)

***Now how on Gaia’s Green Earth does the Department of Elections get away with paying pollworkers less than minimum wage for a 15 hour day on Election Day plus three hours of unpaid training? It’s not considered work? There’s some exception? I gots to know. They called me again yesterday, following up on the numerous letters they’ve already sent out. 1. No, I don’t want to work this election. 2. No, I don’t want to work future elections. (Short phone call.) You know, maybe if the City paid election workers at least minimum wage, you know, the way they require everybody else in town to pay minimum wage, then the City wouldn’t have such a hard time finding workers who don’t go psycho and steal ballots and cell phones and whatnot? Maybe? Anyway, IMO the only reason to sign up for a pollworker gig is to get out of working for a campaign, which, back in the day, I was more or less required to do, you know, take vacation days off to work on campaigns else my supe, a so-called Constitutional Officer of the State of California would frown a perfect upside-down smile at me. And you don’t want that. And oh yes, remember to not tell the Fiona people you’re also working on Leland’s campaign and to not tell the Leland people you’re also working on Fiona’s campaign, cause, you know. Ah mem’ries.

****Which is actually an aging 8-passenger Toyota (which is actually shorter than some two-door Camry Solaras), but don’t worry – it has an old-school throttle cable going through the firewall and an electronic throttle position sensor doohicky too, belts-and-suspenders style, so I’ll have no one to blame when I get caught speeding on the superslab or crashing into things…

Meet Malia Cohen, Your New San Francisco Supervisor

Tuesday, December 28th, 2010

This was the scene a month or so ago when District 10 Supervisor-Elect Malia Cohen was exiting City Hall right at the time Supervisor Sophie Maxwell was entering. (Think the last time I bumped into Malia was at, of all places, Roberta Achtenberg’s house about a half-decade ago.*)

Anywho, here are the fresh Meet Malia Cohen profiles from the big MSM papers. Choose one or both:

From Joshua Sabatini; or

From Rachel Gordon

Good Luck, Malia!

* I remember that well – I was the only dood there.

The Cute Raccoons of the Legion of Honor Go Viral – a Worldwide Sensation

Monday, November 16th, 2009

San Francisco’s hungry raccoons are delighting the online world the world over, entertaining millions with their poses of masked banditry. And why not – aren’t they cute?

Here’s another view from the camera of shutterbug Stephen Thompson. It was 2:00 AM at the Legion of Honor museum:

article-1227126-072423FD000005DC-452_634x325

And here’s the full story. Dude jogs around town in the midnight hour carrying his point-and-shoot camera in a sock. Bravo. 

But these photos were taken in 2006. They hung around as 1′s and 0′s until Stephen posted them to Flickr a few months back. Then, they were noticed by the Fantastic Mr. FoxAndrew Fox, Webmaster at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco (FAMSF). He made a post to the FAMSF Facebook and then the rest is history.

Are these gorgeous but fiesty raccoons now the cutest animals in San Francisco?

Maybe.

But remember, we’ll always have Parrots.

The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill that is:

GO8F7630b copy

Click to expand, it gets big. From 2005, above Telegraph Hill. Remember this day? The parrots wore green, you wore blue.

Thanks for posting your photos, Stephen Thompson.

Famous Phil Bronstein, Michael Kinsley, Steve Coll ask “What Comes After Newspapers?”

Wednesday, May 6th, 2009

Publicity-shy San Francisco Chronicle/Hearst Communications editor-at-large Phil BronsteinThe One responsible for our nation’s recent newspaper upheaval, is not one to blow his own horn. You see he’s too polite too mention it, but he will be the star at tomorrow’s “What Comes After Newspapers?” panel at Fort Mason tomorrow night.

This free event is being put on by Zócalo Public Square, the people who just brought you Craigslist Founder Craig Newmark (another purported Killer of Newspapers.)

Get the deets below:

The answer is out there, Phil, and it’s looking for you, and it will find you if you want it to.

It appears there are a few seats left. You should get over there and try to ask them about Rupert Murdoch’s great idea.

Zócalo in San Francisco
What Comes After Newspapers?
  

A Zócalo/New America Foundation Event

Moderated by David Folkenflik, media correspondent, National Public Radio

Thursday, May 07, 2009, 7:30 pm

Fort Mason Center
Golden Gate Room at the Conference Center, Building A
San Francisco, CA 94123

From town tabloids to major metropolitan dailies, newspapers seem to be in their last throes. The availability of free and instant news online, the high profit margins demanded by media conglomerates, and the steep declines in advertising revenue have hit newspapers hard. They have been forced to lay off employees, trim their pages, close print operations or–as The Hearst Corp. has threatened to do to the San Francisco Chronicle–shut down completely. Will a new model or medium rise to do what newspapers have aimed to do for over a century–pursue accuracy and objectivity, doggedly investigate stories, act as a check on power, embody a community’s conversation with itself, and write a first draft of history? Or will the demise of newspapers mean a radical shift in what we know and how we know it? Zócalo hosts a panel–including former Washington Post managing editor Steve Coll, Slate founder Michael Kinsley, and former San Francisco Chronicle executive vice president and editor Phil Bronstein–to discuss the decline of print media and the future of journalism.

The New America Foundation is a nonprofit, nonpartisan public policy institute based in Washington, D.C. For more information, click www.newamerica.net.

San Francisco’s Phil Bronstein Plays the Colbert Report – Tonight, Tonight, Tonight!

Wednesday, April 8th, 2009

You all know San Francisco Chronicle / Hearst Communications editor-at-large Phil Bronstein, right? He is The One responsible for our nation’s recent newspaper upheaval, don’t you know.

Well, just now he’s taping a segment for tonight’s airing of the Colbert Report, so watch it tonight at 8:30 PM (or 11:30 PM, one of those, probably) on Channel 63, the Comedy Central comedy channel.

Will Phil rely on Bullet Time to dodge the slings and arrows from Stephen Colbert? We Can Only Hope:

PB as Neo.

Be sure to tune in tonight!

Phil Bronstein Claims “I Am The One” Responsible for Current Newspaper Upheaval

Monday, March 2nd, 2009

Apparently, San Francisco Chronicle / Hearst Communications editor-at-large Phil Bronstein am become Death, Destroyer of Worlds. But there’s an upside to our recent newspaper upheaval:

My old officemate, Eve Batey, ex of SFist, is launching the San Francisco Appeal news web site this week with former Chronicle investigative reporter and editor, Chuck Finnie. The SF-based Public Press, describing itself as non-profit, non-commercial, donation-supported news operation, recently advertised on Craigslist for journalists and ended up hiring former Oakland Tribune editor, Michelle Fitzhugh-Craig, a definite pro.

See? It looks like things might shake out all right after all.

Like Neo in the matrix, he is The One.

To Be Continued…

San Francisco’s Pizza Delivery Redlining – It’s Nice and Legal

Saturday, November 8th, 2008

Well looky here - a redlined pizza delivery map of Amici’s East Coast Pizzeria. It’s the talk of the town over at Eater SF and kissing cousin Curbed SF. Click on the below to see where they just don’t deliver. Why? Driver safety.

Of course taxi drivers can’t legally refuse to take you to certain areas of San Francisco due to their concerns over their personal safety. Non, non, non. ‘Cause that’s a crime called failure to convey, which can land a cabbie in the hoosegow. But isn’t there a law that bans this sort of practice from pizzerias?

Well, yes and no. Check out the law, the part that covers delivery redlining, below. (“You must know ze code,” as Professor Stefan Reisenfeld used to say, back in the day.)

People in the Western Addition, Tenderloin (including it’s Sixth Street Annex, also known as The Flank, in view of the fact that it’s just south of the ’Loin) and the projects on the southern slope of Potrero Hill all might have trouble getting a pie delivered in James Crow San Francisco:

Back in 1996, then Supervisor Willie Kennedy gave us a law (that became national news), but then it got watered down such that a “reasonable good faith belief” that a driver would be in danger in a particular nabe is enough to allow the brazen publication of the map shown above.

And let’s not forget flower and newspaper delivery people - they’re off the hook as well. (Note also that there doesn’t seem to be any designated punishment for violation anyway.) To review, cabbies are on the hook, delivery people not.

NB: Dominoes appears to use a different map, or maybe none at all, as it seems they’ll delivery just about anywhere in our seven square.

The More You Know…

SEC. 3305.1. HOME DELIVERY SERVICES.

(a) It shall be unlawful for any person or business entity to refuse to provide home delivery services to any residential address within the City and County of San Francisco falling within that person’s or business entity’s normal service range. A person or business entity may not set its normal service range to exclude a neighborhood or location based upon the race, color, ancestry, national origin, place of birth, sex, age, religion, creed, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, weight or height, of the residents of that neighborhood or location. Where a person or business entity regularly advertises home delivery services to the entire City and County, that person or business entity’s “normal service range” shall be defined by the geographic boundaries of the City and County.

(b) For purposes of this Section, “home delivery services” shall mean the delivery of merchandise to residential addresses, when such services are regularly advertised or provided by any person or business entity.

(c) Notwithstanding any other provision of this Section, it shall not be unlawful for a person or business entity to refuse to provide home delivery services to a residential address if (i) the occupants at that address have previously refused to pay in full for services provided to them by that person or business entity; or (ii) such refusal is necessary for the employer to comply with any applicable State or federal occupational safety and health requirements or existing union contract; or (iii) the person or business entity has a reasonable good faith belief that providing delivery services to that address would expose delivery personnel to an unreasonable risk of harm.

(Added by Ord. 217-96, App. 5/30/96; amended by Ord. 295-96, App. 7/17/96; Ord. 222-02, File No. 021462, App. 11/15/2002)