Posts Tagged ‘nps’

Crissy Field is Going to be Locked Down this Weekend – Here are All the Rules for the “Patriot Prayer” and Protest

Wednesday, August 23rd, 2017

[UPDATE: If you want to take MUNI to the counter-protest, you’re looking at a 2.5 mile walk at the end of your trip.]

FBOW, it’s on.

Get all the deets from our National Park Service here.

And our Presidio Trust weighs in after the jump..

“First Amendment Permits | Aug 25-27

Message from GGNRA Acting General Superintendent Cicely Muldoon

August 23, 2017

The National Park Service has a long and proud tradition of being the site of peaceful expressions of people’s views under the First Amendment to the US Constitution which guarantees everyone the right to gather together and express their opinions non-violently. We cannot deny a permit to anyone planning to exercise their First Amendment rights based on their political stance or beliefs. We can deny a permit application for public safety reasons if the event raises such significant public safety concerns that law enforcement cannot manage the event.

Today, NPS is approving five First Amendment permits for people to express their views in a non-violent way this weekend in San Francisco: On August 25: “People’s Town Hall Candlelight Vigil” and “People’s Town Hall Press Conference” on Crissy Field; on August 26: “Better Angels San Francisco” and “STOP HATE human banner” on Ocean Beach, and “Patriot Prayer” on Crissy Field.

We urge those planning to attend these events to share their views in a peaceful manner, to look out for each other, and to support law enforcement personnel to keep everyone safe. NPS respects the right to free speech and in turn we expect all participants to respect one another and this beautiful national park.

Planning for Safe and Peaceful Events

Many people have expressed concerns about safety related to the Patriot Prayer event. After consultation with other law enforcement colleagues, including the San Francisco Police Department, National Park Service law enforcement believe that whether a permit is issued or not, many people will come to Crissy Field on August 26 to express their opinions. Law enforcement advised that issuing a permit will increase their ability to ensure public safety. Accordingly, the National Park Service has decided to approve the permit with significant conditions to promote the peaceful, non-violent expression of views.

National Park Service law enforcement personnel from around the country are working together with the San Francisco Police Department to ensure safe events for all participants. In particular, NPS law enforcement personnel are working very closely with the SFPD on the Patriot Prayer event. Any violence will not be tolerated.

Closures in the Presidio on August 26

To ensure public safety, portions of the Presidio and many businesses within the park will be closed to the public on August 26. Visitors to the Presidio are likely to experience traffic, road closures and other large event related impacts. We strongly encourage visitors who will not be attending the Patriot Prayer event to consider coming to the Presidio on another day.

For more detailed information on all the First Amendment permitted events in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area on August 25 and 26, including the Patriot Prayer event permit restrictions and traffic plans, please visit www.nps.gov/goga. Please check back frequently, as we will be adding information throughout the week.

We are grateful for the collaboration of the San Francisco Police Department for their partnership in ensuring everyone’s safety. We also thank all of the local, state and federal public agency partners who have come to our assistance.

We welcome all to express their views by writing us at e-mail us or calling: 415-561-2822.

Sincerely,

Cicely Muldoon
Acting General Superintendent
Event information will be updated as it becomes available. Please check back frequently.

 

Frequently Asked Questions:

Why did GGNRA approve the Patriot Prayer First Amendment permit?

The National Park Service (NPS) has listened carefully to the important concerns raised about the August 26 Patriot Prayer First Amendment permit request for Crissy Field. With public safety being our highest priority in making a decision to issue a First Amendment permit, we have thoroughly assessed the risks associated with this event in consultation with the United States Park Police (USPP), the San Francisco Police Department and other key state and federal public safety agencies.

After intensive planning and consultation with the law enforcement community, we have determined that public safety will be best served by a permitted event rather than an unpermitted event. Based on this public safety assessment, and the direction of the Constitution, the courts and National Park Service policy, we have decided to approve the final permit which is now available for viewing in our Reading Room.
Have other First Amendment permits been issued for the weekend of August 26?

In addition to the Patriot Prayer Special Use Permit, NPS has approved four other First Amendment related permit requests for people to express their views in a non-violent way this weekend in San Francisco: On August 25: “People’s Town Hall Candlelight Vigil” and “People’s Town Hall Press Conference” on Crissy Field; on August 26: “Better Angels San Francisco” and “STOP HATE human banner” on Ocean Beach, and “Patriot Prayer” on Crissy Field.
Can citizens carry guns to the Patriot Prayer permitted event?

GGNRA has the ability to exercise control over what items are allowed at a permitted event by specifying permit conditions. In the case of the Patriot Prayer permit, participants are prohibited from bringing firearms or anything that could be used as a weapon.
What items are prohibited from being brought into Crissy Field (Zone 1 – see map) on August 26?

1. Firearms

2. Aerosols / pressurized canisters

3. Ammunition

4. Animals other than working service animals

5. Backpacks and bags exceeding the size restriction of 18” by 13” by 7”

6. Bicycles

7. Balloons

8. Coolers

9. Drones and other unmanned aircraft systems

10. Explosives

11. Helmets

12. Glass, thermal or metal containers

13. Laser pointers

14. Mace / pepper spray

15. Packages

16. Selfie sticks

17. Signs exceeding the size restriction of 24” by 36” by ¼”

18. Structures

19. Supports for signs and placards including sticks of any material

20. Toy guns

21. Weapons of any kind

22. Barbeque grills, open flames, propane tanks, and tiki torches

23. Tents, canopies, and similar structures

24. Wagons or carts

25. Any other items determined to be potential safety hazards

26. Liquids (other than drinking water in factory sealed, clear plastic bottles)
Note that all event attendees are subject to federal law.
The permit along with a full list of permit conditions will be available in our Reading Room by close of business on Wednesday, August 23, 2017.

Can people carry guns in the GGNRA?

GGNRA adheres to all California State gun control laws. In the State of California, the open carry of firearms in public is illegal. Concealed firearms can only be carried by individuals with a Carry Concealed Weapon (CCW) license issued only by a California county sheriff or chief of police.

However, the permit conditions for the Patriot Prayer First Amendment event prohibit firearms.

What steps is NPS taking to facilitate a safe event on August 26th?

NPS is actively working in coordination with multiple law enforcement entities including the United States Park Police, SF Police Department, SF Sheriff’s Office, California Highway Patrol and California Office of Emergency Services to put appropriate measures in place to support a safe, respectful First Amendment gathering on Crissy Field on Saturday, August 26th. This group is working together to identify appropriate staffing levels, develop a coordinated traffic plan, and plan for a gathering space that supports the parks goal of a peaceful gathering.

In order support a safe gathering on August 26, a public access plan has been developed designating two restricted zones within the Presidio: Zone 1 and Zone 2. Zone 1 is Crissy FIeld and vicinity. Zone 1 can only be accessed on foot via the Marina Gate. No vehicles are bicycles or parking are permitted in Zone 1. Zone 2 is the Main Post and vicinity. No pedestrians, vehicles, bicycles, or parking is permitted in Zone 2.

What roads are closed on August 26 within the Presidio? Where am I prohibited from driving and parking?

Crissy Field will be closed to vehicles and bicycles on August 26. The Main Post will be closed to vehicles, bicycles, and pedestrians. No parking will be available in either of these areas. See map. Major road closures include:

  • Mason Street will be closed at the Marina Gate
  • Arguello Boulevard will be closed at Washington Boulevard
  • Park Boulevard will be closed at Kobbe Avenue
  • Lincoln Boulevard will be closed at Funston Avenue and Storey/Merchant
  • Presidio Boulevard will be closed at Mesa
  • Moraga Avenue will be closed at Mesa
  • Ruckman/Storey will be available at Lincoln
  • The east Toll Plaza of the Golden Gate Bridge will be closed at Lincoln

How do I access Crissy Field on August 26?

Event participants will only be able to access Crissy Field on foot via the Marina Boulevard Gate (Mason Street at Lyon). Vehicles and bicycles will not be permitted at Crissy Field on Saturday. All people entering the Presidio at the Mason Street Gate will be screened to ensure that prohibited items are not brought into Crissy Field (see list).

What transportation is available to Crissy Field on August 26?

Do not drive to this event; there will be no parking. Event participants will only be able to access Crissy Field on foot via the Marina Boulevard Gate (Mason Street at Lyon). The PresidiGo Around the Park Shuttle will not be operating on this day. The nearest MUNI services to Crissy Field/Marina Boulevard Gate include the 30 and 43. The MUNI 22 and 45 drop off a farther distance from the Marina Boulevard Gate. For MUNI services available on August 26, visit the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency website at www.sfmta.com. Please check this website before making your trip to ensure you have the most current information about MUNI service.

Where can I view the Patriot Prayer permit?

The Patriot Prayer First Amendment permit application can currently be viewed in our Reading Room, the final approval permit will also be made available by close of busines Wednesday, August 23, 2017.

Will the Presidio be open on the 26th?

Portions of the Presidio and many businesses within the park will be closed to the public on August 26. Visitors to the Presidio are likely to experience traffic, road closures and other large event related impacts. We strongly encourage visitors who will not be attending the First Amendment event to consider coming to the Presidio on another day.

Will businesses in the Presidio remain open?

While NPS does not require tenants close their businesses, many tenants have elected to close due to potential impacts of street and parking lot closures and crowds. Following is a list of tenant closures by park area:

AT CRISSY FIELD

Tenant Organizations (all organizations will be closed, including these public-serving tenants):

Batters Box SF

House of Air

Military Intelligence Service Historic Learning Center

La Petite Baleen

Planet Granite

Roaring Mouse Cycles

Sports Basement

University of San Francisco

Park-Managed Facilities

Crissy Field Center

Warming Hut

Fort Point National Historic Site and Park Store

The Portal (temporary art installation)

Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary

National Park Service Park Archives

AT THE MAIN POST

Tenant Organizations (all organizations will be closed, including these public-serving tenants):

Interfaith Center at the Presidio

Presidio Bowling Center

Presidio Dance Theatre

Baptiste Yoga SF

Society of California Pioneers

Walt Disney Family Museum

Park-Managed Facilities

San Francisco National Cemetery

Presidio Visitor Center

Presidio Officers’ Club

Presidio Transit Center

TRANSIT Restaurant

Arguello Restaurant

The Commissary Restaurant

Andy Goldsworthy’s Tree Fall

AT THE GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE

Park-Managed Facilities

Golden Gate Bridge Welcome Center

Golden Gate Bridge Café and Roundhouse Cafe

How many First Amendment permits does GGNRA issue each year?

GGNRA issues an average of 1,000 special use permits each year in the GGNRA. About 20 of those permits are identified as an “exercise of First Amendment Rights.”

How does a Special Event Permit differ from First Amendment Permit?
Special events in National Parks need to submit proof of insurance and other plans, as their use is considered a privilege, but First Amendment activities are considered a right, and many of these types of requirements are waived. The decision to waive these requirements is consistent with the US Constitution and guidance from judicial opinions, including the US Supreme Court. The National Park Service therefore does not impose financial barriers on the expression of First Amendment rights. The costs of fencing, restrooms, and NPS event monitoring costs are waived for such events.
Why did GGNRA deny a permit for the Summer of Love concert?

GGNRA did not receive or deny a permit request for the “Summer of Love” concert as Golden Gate Park is not under our federal jurisdiction. The City and County of San Francisco’s Recreation and Park Department (Golden Gate Park) denied the permit.

bill of rights

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Surprise! Newly Refurbished Baker-Barry “Five-Minute” Tunnel is 1) Bright; 2) Dry; and 3) Not Smelly, At All

Thursday, July 6th, 2017

Here it is:

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Here’s how things used to be – dark, wet and smelly:

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Area Yelpers are not yet yelping about the improvements, but they will, someday, I’m sure:

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All the deets, from our feds:

Marin Headlands: Tunnel and Scenic Overlook Parking/Pull-Outs

Tunnel re-opened June 3, 2017

Updated June 6, 2017

The major phases of the Baker-Barry Tunnel preservation project are complete. Crews have addressed fissures and cracks in the tunnel wall, pumped polyurethane into the gaps around the tunnel lining, and installed a new, more energy-efficient lighting system. The historic tunnel is now preserved to bring the next generation of park visitors to the Marin Headlands.

Parking and pull-outs are now open to vehicles on Conzelman Road east of the McCullogh traffic circle.

For a summary of the work to date and photos inside the project, read this recent article in the Marin IJ.

 

About the Tunnel Preservation Project: Safer Surfaces. Better Lighting.

This project repaired the tunnel’s concrete structure. Repaired cracks and leaks resulted in a slippery film of sediment that created a safety hazard for vehicles and bicyclists.

A new tunnel LED light system will reduce energy use by an estimated 40% from what was the single largest energy user at Golden Gate National Recreation Area! The new lights also better illuminate the tunnel for vehicles and bicyclists.

We also replaced water and sewer lines mounted in the tunnel. The outdated water and sewer lines were subject to frequent breaks which resulted in tunnel closures.

The Baby Salmon of Redwood Creek in Muir Woods – They’re Still Around, in 2016, But…

Tuesday, June 28th, 2016

…who knows about the Future:
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The Advisability of Riding Your Bike Through the Bunker Road Tunnel Whether the Light is Green or Not

Tuesday, June 28th, 2016

Here it is, your Bunker Road Tunnel* to Rodeo Beach and beyond.

The driver of this old Datsun(!) pickup truck seemed to be giving this cyclist a little bit of room, but then a shout came out…

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…from this guy going the other way. So whoops, the Datsun driver moves a yard or two to the right. Thusly:

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Bikes have dedicated lanes in this tunnel but cars don’t. Does that mean that bikes don’t have to wait up to five minutes for a green light the way cars have to? I know not. The surfer dudes in the 4WD pickup could not possibly look more like Marin Locals, like Regulars on this stretch of road, but the driver was surprised to see a cyclist going the other way? Now because it’s a tunnel, shouting works, but what if dudes had had the radio on and couldn’t hear? There could have been an accident.

Seems that waiting for the green would be safer. There’s room for debate, I suppose. (I think I’d want to see a sign saying it’s OK for bikes to proceed afore I ran a red light…)

EPILOGUE:

A single-lane tunnel carries Bunker Road from the Rodeo Valley to U.S. 101. Built in 1918, this tunnel is known as Baker-Berry Tunnel but also known as the Bunker Road Tunnel or the Five Minute Tunnel. A date stamp on the western entrance to the Baker-Barry Tunnel lists 1994, which may have been the year the tunnel was retrofitted for earthquake protection or reconstructed for other reasons. Additional work was completed in 2013 to allow for wider approaches for bicyclists. A traffic signal governs the flow of traffic into the tunnel, since only one direction may proceed at a time.

*Some mock the Yelp for rating a tunnel:

“Solid four-star tunnel… Screw you, Yelp.”

“What can I say, it’s a hole in the ground..lol”

Why Doesn’t Frisco’s Deadly Ocean Beach have Lifeguard Towers? – IDK – Here’s the Substitute, the BEACH PATROL

Wednesday, June 15th, 2016

Well I guess the basic answer is that having SoCal-style, LIFEGUARD ON DUTY structures in Frisco is that it would cost a lot of money.

So there’s that. And I’ve also heard that having lifeguard towers around would send a message that OB is a safe place to swim. (And certainly it’s not. It’s not even a safe place to wade in.)

Anyway, here’s one of the trucks they send out when people go missing:

7J7C7325 copy

Innovation Capital Of The World is what some call us. Or rather it’s what some, effectively, pay the Mayor to call us. Is a pickup truck with a surfboard “innovative?” IDTS.

Anyway, here’s a newsflash about America’s Most Dangerous Beach from 18 years ago. Not much has changed since then. We have a few more signs now, but otherwise…

Marina District Gratified by All the White People Who Showed Up for America’s Cup – But Says No to Regular Tourists

Tuesday, September 11th, 2012

Work with me here. The recent America’s Cup scrimmage event up in San Francisco’s Great White North got this kind of reaction in the pages of the Marina Times:

“This event brought exactly the right kind of crowd to the Marina.”

Uh, white people with some extra folding money to spend – that kind of crowd?

Mmmm…

Anyway, you’d think that the friendly Marinites would similarly welcome the Feds landing Alcatraz tour boats at Fort Mason, right?

No.

Let’s hear from socially awkward, born-into-the-one-percent District Two Supervisor Mark Farrell in the very same pages of the Marina Times:

“The National Park Service’s (NPS) intention to study Fort Mason as a possible location for its Alcatraz tour ferry service is one of those ideas with serious and long-lasting impacts that must immediately be put to rest.”

(Yeah, it’s one of those ideas, huh? So like, Alex, I want “Ideas with serious and long-lasting impacts that must immediately be put to rest” for $1600?”)

Apparently, one set of aquatic tourists is the best thing in the world and another set of aquatic tourists is the worst thing in the world?

OK fine.

Hey Marina, look at this! You think the future can’t cross a bridge ride through a tunnel?

Now here’s the kicker. The reason why the white people of the Marina are worried about the Fort Mason proposal is that it’s a lead pipe cinch, owing to the lack of NIMBY laws on federal land:

“What makes the idea even more distressing to residents and establishments in the Marina is the lack of local environmental review and input that would be available. The NPS stated that environmental review of the Fort Mason site would be conducted under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and not under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), because Fort Mason is federal property. Without a CEQA process in place for Fort Mason, the enormous changes contemplated in the Marina will never be considered by our local government, and any NEPA appeal would have to take place in Washington through the federal courts. In my letter to the NPS, I asked that since they are prepared to undergo a CEQA analysis for the sites located at the Port of San Francisco piers, they should do the same for the NPS-owned piers at Fort Mason…”

So, don’t come here, Feds. Don’t come here where it’s super easy to do business, you know, without dealing with millionaire NIMBYs for decades, oh no, don’t even think about it! Feds, you must immediately put the idea “to rest.”

Well, we’ll just have to wait and see how that works…

Do You Think the Rich White People of the Marina District Want a Ferry Landing at Fort Mason? Hells No!

Friday, August 3rd, 2012

Our National Park Service is thinking about moving the Alcatraz ferry landing from Fisherman’s Wharf to Fort Mason. And maybe they’d go to other places like the Marin Headlands or Sausalito.

Sounds all right to me, but the Marina Community Association is not pleased with the idea of all those non-white people messing things up in the Great White North of San Francisco.

Now, let’s hear from the King of the NIMBYs, District Two Supervisor Mark Farrell:

Check it:

“Adding the potential of 5,000 visitors per day or 35,000 visitors per week will more than double the population of the Marina…”

Except that adding the potential of 5,000 visitors per day or 35,000 visitors per week would not more than double the population of the Marina.

So there’s that.

Anyway, go for it, Feds, go for Fort Mason, why not?

All the deets:

Notice Of Intent To Prepare An Environmental Impact Statement For Alcatraz Ferry Embarkation Site.

In accordance with § 102(2)(C) of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, and pursuant to the Council on Environmental Quality’s regulations (40 CFR parts 1500-08), the National Park Service (NPS) is initiating the conservation planning and environmental impact analysis process for the proposed establishment of a long-term ferry embarkation site for passenger ferry service between the northern San Francisco waterfront and Alcatraz Island. In addition to considering the Alcatraz Ferry Embarkation site, the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) will also evaluate potential for a secondary ferry transit service offering a cross-bay connection from the San Francisco embarkation site to Sausalito and/or Fort Baker. NPS is the lead federal agency for the environmental review under NEPA, and is developing the project in coordination with the Port of San Francisco (Port) and City and County of San Francisco (City) planning and transportation agencies.Show citation box

As set forth in 36 CFR 800.8(c), the NPS is also using the NEPA process to fulfill certain provisions of § 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act related to consultation and public involvement. In addition, the NPS has requested that the Port and the City be cooperating agencies for the EIS. In the event that a site on Port property is identified as the preferred alternative, environmental review of the project pursuant to the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) would be required, and would be initiated at a later date.Show citation box

All scoping comments must be postmarked or transmitted not later than July 31, 2012.Show citation box

Background: Alcatraz Island, the site of pre-Civil War fortifications, was the nation’s first military prison. It later became the most notorious maximum security penitentiary in the United States, and subsequently was the site of the occupation that helped ignite the movement for American Indian self-determination. Over 1.4 million people visit Alcatraz Island annually from the existing ferry embarkation site at Pier 311/2in San Francisco, managed by Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA). The Alcatraz Ferry Embarkation EIS will build upon several studies completed by NPS, the Port, the City, the State of California, and the California Water Emergency Transportation Authority (WETA; formerly the Water Transit Authority).Show citation box

A 2011 draft feasibility study identified potential sites for consideration located among GGNRA, Fisherman’s Wharf, and the northern Embarcadero. The sites studied included Port piers 191/2, 291/2, 311/2, 41, and 45, and GGNRA piers 1, 2, 3, and 4 at Fort Mason. If suggested during scoping, other sites that meet the project purpose and need could also be considered. The draft feasibility study and subsequent investigations also analyzed the surrounding area, identified the programs and facilities needed to operate the sites, existing conditions at the sites, and criteria to evaluate the sites.Show citation box

The NPS seeks to secure a site on the northern San Francisco waterfront that provides for a long-term (50 years or more) orientation and ferry embarkation facility for visitors to Alcatraz Island. NPS desires an identifiable, adequate, and quality visitor welcome and support area that begins to connect visitors to Alcatraz history, GGNRA, and the national park system. The NPS also seeks to establish ferry connections between the embarkation site and existing piers at Sausalito and/or at Fort Baker, which is managed by GGNRA.Show citation box

The need for the project is driven by the following factors:Show citation box

  • Alcatraz ferry service is currently subject to location changes every 10 years which has led to visitor confusion, community concerns, and inconsistency in visitor support services.Show citation box
  • Ability to make improvements at the existing site is constrained by lease provisions between the Port and the concessioner, with substantial amounts of revenue spent on rent, reducing the amount available to invest on Alcatraz and other GGNRA sites.Show citation box
  • The condition of existing facilities constrains and negatively affects NPS and the concessioners’ abilities to create a recognizable identity and quality visitor experience.Show citation box
  • The current facility has insufficient space to appropriately orient visitors to Alcatraz or provide information to the many visitors who are unable to visit Alcatraz.Show citation box
  • There is very limited opportunity to provide cross-bay ferry service to other GGNRA areas.Show citation box

The objectives for this project include creating a ferry embarkation site that:Show citation box

  • Establishes a long-term (50 years or more) primary location for visitor access to Alcatraz Island.Show citation box
  • Is economically feasible and sustainable, and generates revenue for investment on Alcatraz and other park facilities and visitor programs.Show citation box
  • Accommodates critical visitor and operational programs and facilities, and provides for efficient land and vessel operations.Show citation box
  • Provides an identifiable area for quality welcome, orientation, and interpretation of the natural, cultural, scenic and recreational resources of Alcatraz, the larger GGNRA, and the national park system.Show citation box
  • Provides facilities for cross-bay ferry service to accommodate existing and future visitor demand for travel to Alcatraz Island, Muir Woods, and the Marin Headlands.Show citation box

Public Scoping Comments and Further Information: This notice serves to formally open the agency and public scoping comment phase for this EIS. Key impact topics which are expected to be addressed in the EIS include transportation, visitor experience, aesthetics, economics, cultural resources, natural resources, and air quality—however, agencies, members of the public, and interested organizations are encouraged to provide any comments on the spectrum of issues and concerns that should be addressed. Respondents will also assist with defining a suitable range of alternatives; advise on the nature and extent of potential environmental impacts, including natural, cultural, socioeconomic and other topics; and suggest possible mitigation strategies that would reduce potential impacts from project development.Show citation box

Several public scoping meetings will be scheduled in San Francisco and Marin Counties. Meeting dates, times, and locations will be publicized through local and regional news media, by email to the park mailing list (to be included on the EIS email list, please visit: www.nps.gov/goga and click the “Join the Mailing List” link), and via the project Web site http://parkplanning.nps.gov/ALCAembarkation. This Web site will also provide relevant information, including the project description, planning process updates, meeting notices, reports and documents, and useful links associated with the project. You may also contact theGGNRA Planning Division at goga_planning@nps.gov or (415) 561-4700 for further information.Show citation box

ADDRESSES: Written comments should be mailed to the following address: Superintendent, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, Attn: Alcatraz Ferry Embarkation EIS, Fort Mason, Bldg. 201, San Francisco, CA 94123. Before including your address, phone number, email address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so.Show citation box

Decision Process: At this time, it is anticipated that the Draft EIS will be available for public review in mid-2013. Availability of the document for review will be announced by the publication of a Notice of Availability in the Federal Register, through local and regional news media, via the project Web site, and by email to project email recipients. Additional public meetings will be held after the Draft EIS is distributed to provide further opportunities to comment on the proposed project. Following due consideration of all comments received on the Draft EIS, preparation of the Final EIS is anticipated to be completed in 2014. As a delegated EIS, the official responsible for the final decision regarding the proposed ferry embarkation site is the NPS Regional Director, Pacific West Region. Subsequently, the official responsible for implementation will be the GGNRA Superintendent.Show citation box

Dated: April 6, 2012.

Patricia L. Neubacher,

Acting Regional Director, Pacific West Region.

Family Fun for the Holidays: Going Crabbing at Torpedo Wharf Under the Golden Gate Bridge for Free – No Permits Required

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2011

Why, this bucolic scene almost looks like Mayberry, R.F.D., excepting for the famous bridge up high.

Check it:

You can legally fish or crab without a license at Torpedo Wharf at the west end of Crissy Field. Look for posted regulations.”

Them’s crabbers down there, that’s what they are, those West End girls and boys

Click to expand

It’s easy to get started.

All the deets.

OMG, OMG, It’s “Summer Fun Day” at the Presidio Trust’s Crissy Field This Saturday! Noon to 5:00 PM, July 30th, 2011

Thursday, July 28th, 2011

Oh man, after those AM clouds drift away this Saturday, it’s going to be a dreaded sunny day at Crissy Field for you and the fam at Summer Fun Day 2011!

Check it:

“On July 30, Outdoor Nation, The Presidio Trust and the National Park Service will co-host a Summer Fun Day celebration at Crissy Field’s Historic Airfield. The public is invited to participate in an incredible range of outdoor recreation—from rock climbing, to camping competitions to orienteering—that are available close to home. This event is free and is expected to attract thousands of Bay Area residents. More information can be found at SummerFunDay.org.”

Summer Fun Day San Francisco:

Presented by: The North Face, REI Foundation and The Conservation Fund
Co-Host: National Park Service and Crissy Field
When: Saturday, July 30 | 12:00noon-5:00pm
Location: Crissy Field’s Historic Airfield
Address: Mason Street, San Francisco, CA

Calling all Bay Area Residents!
Don’t miss a day of free family fun on Outdoor Nation’s ultimate, outdoor adventure playground!

Highlights of Summer Fun Day San Francisco:

REI Family Camping Fun
Hula Hooping and other Retro Games hosted by Merrell
Biking
Prizes, including CamelBak Water Bottles
Music, hiking and more!

All the deets, below.

Is Crissy Field really still growing? If so, the Continental Drift Theory is proven once again:

See you there!

Outdoor Nation Summer Youth Summits Culminate in San Francisco

Youth-led Movement for the Outdoors Plans Agenda—with more than $100,000 in Dedicated Funding for Youth Project Ideas—to Expand Access, Activity, and Appreciation

San Francisco, California – Outdoor Nation, the youth-led movement championing the outdoors, is coming to San Francisco, the fifth and final stop on the series of 2011 Youth Summits. For many reasons—access, cultural relevance, education, time, budget cuts—America’s youth is losing touch with the outdoors. Outdoor Nation is empowering the Millennial generation to address the issues head-on and develop their own solutions to connecting youth with the outdoors.

The three-day Summit, co-hosted by The Presidio Trust and the National Park Service, begins on July 29 at 12:00pm at the Presidio’s Fort Scott. A diverse group of more than 200 youth leaders aged 16 to 28 is expected in San Francisco, the Northwest Regional Summit. Delegates were chosen from online applications as well as nominations from Outdoor Nation partners.

Delegates will discuss regional outdoor issues and brainstorm project ideas to remove barriers to participation in the outdoors. Youth participants will vote for the top ideas in each region. The Outdoor Foundation will invest more than $10,000 in projects—a total of $100,000 for all the projects that result from the summits—with support from the National Park Service’s Rivers and Trails and Conservation Assistance National Programs.

Delegates will also address the deep budget cuts and unprecedented closures facing America’s State Parks, Outdoor Nation’s national partner and its top cause for 2011.

Ever more deets, after the jump

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The White Fallow Deer of Point Reyes – Originally from SF Zoo in 1948 – “NPS Genocide” and “The Bambi Effect”

Tuesday, October 19th, 2010

This is the closest I’ve ever been to The White Deer of 4.5 star Yelp-rated Point Reyes National Seashore. It was the view I had from Pierce Point Road.

Now, back in the day, the National Park Service was hiring snipers to hunt down the non-native Fallow and Axis Deer so that Tule Elk and other native species would have an easier life. Well, as detailed by Zachary Zoblig, the Bambi Effect” kicked in like you wouldn’t believe. Thusly:

“They’re just beautiful — they’re like unicorns when they come bounding out of the mist.”
 
After all the commotion, the NPS gave up on the hunting idea. The new approach is a massive contraceptive program that will eliminate these critters by 2025 or so.

Click to expand

The Friends of the White Deer and Save the Point Reyes Deer are just going to have to live with that…

Good luck, Bambi.

Details of the plan, after the jump

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