Posts Tagged ‘nyt’

The Last Time an Ad in the Yellow Pages Worked: How FEMA Found an Aerial Photographer After 9/11

Wednesday, November 16th, 2011

After 9/11, FEMA needed somebody to go up in a chopper every day for nine months to document recovery and removal. A certain Mr. Brown was the man for the job.

Check it, from the NYT, via Todd Lapin:

“Do you do aerial photography?” the caller asked.

“Sure,” Mr. Brown said. “If you have a plane or a helicopter.”

“We have planes and helicopters,” the caller replied.

But, “The truth was, he had never done aerial work.” Uh oh.

Nevertheless, it was all good, and the rest is history.

From before the time the telephone book industry got demolished by the Internet:

Cameras sure were big back then, huh?

Website Name Confusion? “The East Bay Citizen” vs. BANP’s Nascent “The Bay Citizen”

Thursday, April 15th, 2010

Back in the day, back around 1855-1865, the bay area had an actual physical newspaper called the “Daily Citizen” or “San Francisco Daily Citizen” or something. Didn’t last too long.

But these days, the fairly common name Citizen  (it made this list, anyway) is back in bidness in the bay area. Check it – here’s the East Bay Citizen.

See? There’s your straight-up prototypical Citizen Journalism right there, with extensive coverage of sujets civiques in San Leandro and Hayward from highly regarded Steven Tavares. Dude’s even got a manifesto ‘n stuff:

The purpose of The Citizen is to serve the areas of the East Bay that are severely under reported by the local media. The reasons your daily newspaper is sparse devoid of insight or context is either because of financial constraints leading to cutbacks in the newsroom or general dereliction of civic duty (that is the polite way of saying it).”

All right, fair enough.

Comes now the Bay Area  News Project (BANP). See?  It’s backed by more millionaires and billionaires than you can shake a stick at.  Well, next month, they’re going to start up with The Bay Citizen. Here’s their logo:

Question Time. Do you think that there might be confusion between these two outfits, owing to the similarity of the names? I do. Can you imagine how future developments could create even more confusion? Mmmm…

Do you think the person(s) who came up with the name Bay Citizen for the BANP are aware of the online existence of the East Bay Citizen? Yes, of course, how could they not be?

Now, do you think the person(s) who came up with the name Bay Citizen for the BANP bounced the idea off of Steven Tavares beforehand? No, that’s a negatory, good buddy.

And do you think hardworking Steven Tavares is pleased with BANP’s actions? No. (Not saying he’s all pissed off or anything, as he’s manifestly Too Busy To Hate, just saying he’s not pleased.)

All right, Question Time is over. Now, it’s Party Time. Check it:

The Bay Citizen Just got the green light – our launch party will be held at the historic Great American Music Hall in San Francisco on May 26th. It’s a wonderful venue for what we promise will be an amazing party!”

So, for $50 you can score two tickets and then be able to tell all your friends that you’re a “Founder” of the BANP’s Bay Citizen online venture

Party on, I s’pose.

Bay Area News Project to Go Live May 26th, 2010 – Become a Founder for Just $50

Tuesday, March 30th, 2010

That Bay Area News Project / The Bay Citizen, it looks like they’re opening for bidness with a quickness. And they want your money too – actually, you might find donating a few bucks of seed money rewarding. Take a look.

Here’s the pitch I got today:

“Dear LADIESMAN217,
 
“I know that you’re passionate about local journalism, because you’ve signed up for our newsletter.  Now, you have the chance to do something positive for Bay Area news.  Help us create a vital institution for the Bay Area – become a Founder of The Bay Citizen.
 
“The state of news in the Bay Area is at an all-time low.  Half of the professional journalists covering the Bay Area are gone.  Original reporting about education, public policy, government, science and health, art, and other important civic topics has been hit the hardest.  What important stories are we missing?”

Now hold on, is the state of news in the Bay Area really at an “all-time low?” Really?

I’ll tell you, one of the specific examples cited by BANP Founder (the real Founder, not a run-of-the-mill-$50-donation founder) F. Warren Hellman to show the need for non-profit journalism in the bay area was the category of ballet reviews. Now, I just finished coding the HTML for a brace of reviews for the latest ballet performance in town – check it out here. Do you think this incomplete list is too short? Do you think the quality of writing from all those writers just isn’t there? Mmmmm.

Cheer up newsie, you’ll be repurposed and back in action in a couple months:

Anyway, look forward to the BANP owning the field of arts review soon. I don’t know, maybe ballet reviews in newspapers were somehow better back in the day?

Of course that’s a pretty specific nitpick, I’ll agree. But what about a century ago when Bill Hearst got people all fired up about something based on a bunch of lies ’n stuff? Wasn’t that par for the course back then? I’m thinking things are not at an all time low, myself. Oh well.

You can read the rest of that pitch letter after the jump. Be sure to take note of all the perks of Founderdom:

“As a Founder, you will receive:
Free admission to our launch party for you and a guest.  We’re planning to have the event in San Francisco, and we promise an entertaining evening.
Permanent recognition as a Founder on a special page of our Web site which we will unveil when our site goes live.
An invitiation to help shape The Bay Citizen by participating in our surveys and focus groups.
And of course, the satisfaction of knowing that you are helping to make history by supporting the future of Bay Area journalism.
Founders who donate over $1,000 will also receive an invitation to a small-group lunch with myself and Jonathan Weber, our Editor in Chief.
 

(Tell you what, you give this Citizen $50 and I’ll take you out to Chow, no problem. Now, you might not be able to deduct that from your taxes…)

As promised, the rest of the pitch, after the jump. Maybe you’ll think this offer a good deal.

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BANP Update: San Francisco’s Newest Big Media Outlet is Called The Bay Citizen

Tuesday, March 23rd, 2010

San Francisco’s Bay Area News Project has a new name – it’s now called The Bay Citizen.*

But they’ve still not started yet. Where will BANP rank on the list of world’s longest gestation periods? Somewhere betwixt llama and African elelphant, I’ll bet. Stay tuned.

Oh, here’s some news:

“Renowned Investigative Journalist Steve Fainaru Joins The Bay Citizen

Bon Courage, Steve Fainaru.

*That’s kind of close to San Francisco Citizen**, eh? I Better Call Saul.*** Let’s hope they steer of this blog’s core coverage area of cheerleaders, beauty queens and nude Bay to Breakers participants.

**This name was the only alliterative (starting with an “S” as in Sentinel or a soft “C”) old-school 19th-century San Francisco newspaper name available, so that’s why it got picked.

***One of this blog’s half-dozen readers has already weighed in with this bon mot:

“Just saw the Bay Area News Project renamed themselves to Bay Area Citizen. Boooooooooo!”

Bay Area News Project Meets the Students from the Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism

Monday, February 8th, 2010

Elements of our Bay Area News Project, that grand alliance of old money and young blood, recently headed across the Bay Bridge to meet up with the kids from the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism

This meet-and-greet happened a couple of weeks back but the BANP is crowing about it today, so head over and check it out, why don’t you?

Look, it’s brand-new BANP EIC Jonathan Weber and CEO Lisa Frazier at North Gate Hall sharing a few brewskis with the J students:

TwitPic via jrue, aka Jeremy Rue, multimedia training instructor for the Knight Digital Media Center and a lecturer for the Carnegie-Knight program News21

Do you fret over* these students becoming “slaves” or something? You may be richer and older than they, but they’re smarter than you - try to keep that in mind when pondering such matters. These 20-somethings will do fine - they’ll manage to get by, with or without the BANP.

Bon courage, BANP et etudiants.

*Absence of pay-wall duly noted. Isn’t it ironic, dont’cha think?

The Bay Area News Project Finally Makes Its Deal with the New York Times

Thursday, January 21st, 2010

The Bay Area News Project, that grand alliance of old money and young blood, will soon make its debut.

Savor two bits of news released just now:

1.The Bay Area News Project appoints Lisa Frazier as C.E.O and Jonathan Weber as Editor-In-Chief (but maybe you already knew about that, of course), und;

2.The Bay Area News Project to supply news content for Bay Area sections of The New York Times

O.K. then. Don’t you just love it when a plan comes together?

[UPDATE: The SFWeekly's young Joe Eskenazi just grilled the principals of the BANP  just now - his report.]

So the new CEO will be Lisa Frazier, the very same woman who was in charge of the hunt for a CEO? Yes, Lisa. Is the water warm enough? We’ll soon find out.

That’s today’s news. Expect good things…

The Bay Area News Project to Supply News Content for Bay Area Sections of the New York Times

The Bay Area News Project, a new non-profit media organization, and The New York Times announced today that the two organizations are moving forward with a content collaboration. Under the agreement, Bay Area News Project journalists will provide branded news to The New York Times for its San Francisco Bay Area editions on Friday and Sunday.

The New York Times’s Bay Area section was launched in October 2009 and currently features editorial coverage written by The Times’s San Francisco news bureau and other contributors.

“This agreement with the Bay Area News Project is another big step for The Times toward two goals: helping meet the demand for the highest quality local reporting in places around the country where it is getting harder to come by, and finding ways to collaborate with trusted providers to get that job done,” said Bill Keller, executive editor of The New York Times.

“Our aim is to roll out expanded local reports in several key markets around the country, working with local journalists and news organizations in a collaborative way,” said Scott Heekin-Canedy, president and general manager of The New York Times. The Times has a similar arrangement in Chicago with the nonprofit Chicago News Cooperative. “This approach is designed to enhance the print experience for readers and strengthen our subscriber retention,” Mr. Heekin-Canedy said.

In related news, The Bay Area News Project also announced its new C.E.O. Lisa Frazier and Editor-in-Chief Jonathan Weber. The News Project’s publicly-supported and stand-alone newsroom will consist of at least 15 journalists during the new media outlet’s first year.  In addition to providing content to The New York Times, the News Project is developing a Web site and other platforms that will provide original reporting on a wide range of Bay Area civic and community issues.

“We believe that Jonathan Weber, a talented journalist with a world of rich experience, will build a team that can provide a superior local report for readers of The Times in the Bay Area,” Mr. Keller said. “And our agreement with the Bay Area News Project assures that his newsroom will be strictly independent, apolitical and uninfluenced by the generous donors who are making this effort possible.”

Mr. Weber, former co-founder and editor-in-chief of The Industry Standard and former reporter and editor for the LA Times, said: “We’re looking forward to working with one of the world’s leading editorial brands to deliver hard-hitting news and in-depth editorial coverage focused on the San Francisco Bay Area – one of the most intellectually curious, innovative and industrious areas of the country.”

“We are excited to start producing content about the Bay Area for the Bay Area, published in The New York Times,” said Bay Area News Project C.E.O. Lisa Frazier.  “Our print collaboration with The Times assists our sustainability model, and extends the reach of our content in the Bay Area. I am appreciative of Tom Carley, Bill Keller and the rest of their teams for all of their support over the last few months as we got the News Project up and running. We are looking forward to a successful collaboration.”

The Hellman Family Foundation has provided initial seed funding for the Bay Area News Project; other support has come from the Knight Foundation and community members interested in funding quality journalism for the Bay Area.  Investment banking firm Greenhill & Co., law firm Jones Day, and philanthropic advisory firm Hirsch & Associates, LLC have advised Warren Hellman and his working group on the formation of the entity.

About the Bay Area News Project

The Bay Area News Project is a publicly supported news organization focused on providing high-quality, original coverage of Bay Area civic and community news. The locally produced, professional news organization plans to leverage broad collaborations and new digital technologies to provide Bay Area news that reflects the region’s dynamic social and cultural diversity. Coverage will include government and public policy, education, the arts and cultural affairs, the environment, and neighborhood news.  The News Project is currently a fiscally sponsored project of Community Initiatives, a 501(c)(3) organization that enables individuals and groups, working together, to create and invest in projects that benefit the public.

 For more information, please visit www.bayareanewsproject.org.

The other shoe drop after the jump.

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Is the SFPD Starting to Enforce Traffic Laws at the Start of the Wiggle Bike Route?

Wednesday, November 11th, 2009

Who knows how many fatwas were issued last week against New York Times reporter Scott James - no matter. But now it seems that the cops of the SFPD are getting picky about how cars handle the now-famous intersection of Steiner and Duboce, start of The Wiggle bike route.

This aging Land Cruiser (with tiny 15-inch wheels – a 1993 model?) will never die, but it will get its fair share of tickets on the Streets of San Francisco, for both parking and, as here, yesterday night, moving violations. Oh well.

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Click to expand

Will this controversy result in a safer Wiggle?

Only Time Will Tell.

Scott James of the New York Times vs. the Scofflaw Cyclists of San Francisco’s Wiggle

Friday, November 6th, 2009

Scott James has a tiger by the tail with “San Francisco’s Cyclists Facing Backlash for Flouting Rules of the Road.” You see, he doesn’t just talk about cyclists blowing stop signs at speed, he goes and documents it, all judgmental like. Then he posts it on the YouTube for tout le monde to see. That’s going to rub some peoples’ fur the wrong way.

Not sure if anything has changed in San Francisco lately as far as a “backlash” is concerned. If there were some big new enforcement action these days, we would have heard of it by now. Oh well. One new thing Scott mentions is a Critical Mass website that recently popped up, but those kinds of things have popped up before only to earn derision from the “leaderless” corkers on the street. Oh well.

The SFPD will tolerate “California stops” from car drivers if they’re done “correctly” (you know, slowly enough under the circumstances) and they don’t seem to mind cyclists doing the equivalent, which in this town means blowing through a red light or a stop without losing any speed at all. All bets are off if there’s an enforcement action going on. In that case, the cops will want you to stop and put a foot down before proceeding.

The Scott Street part of San Francisco’s Route 30 Wiggle – the route so nice they paved it twice. 

img_6388-copy

Anyway, writer Scotty has people looking out for him:

“Just try to talk about obeying traffic laws, and suddenly the loveliest ecofriendly riders are instantly transformed into venom-spewing bike bullies. I was warned several times not to write about this or risk being publicly vilified as an enemy of the bike world.”

I’d say yes, let’s count down how long it takes for the writer to be “publicly vilified as an enemy of the bike world” due to today’s article. It’s probably happening already.

Oh well.

The Wall Street Journal’s New San Francisco Edition is Welcomed With Open Arms

Thursday, November 5th, 2009

OMG it’s here, it’s finally here! On the heels of the new Bay Area Blog and Bay Area Edition from the New York Times comes the Wall Street Journal ‘s expanded entry into the San Francisco Bay Area market.

Let’s see here, bay areans now have our own webpage at wsj.com and we also have OneSpot - “San Francisco Stories from Around the Web.” And those pages point you to local content, such as this outrageous, 900+ pixel wide photo essay about Haight Ashbury. (Dig the crazy colors, man.)

wsj copy

Give us More, I say. Hang those who talk of less 

All right. Expect good things.

Bon courage, WSJ!