Posts Tagged ‘oahu’

808 State: Presenting the Royal Hawaiian Hotel, the “Pink Palace” What Used to be the Tallest Hotel in Waikiki

Wednesday, February 22nd, 2012

I don’t know what it costs to stay here, maybe $500 per night? But no matter, you can always just pass through the lobby to check it out the next time you visit the 808 State.

See? It looks different, huh? 

Click to expand (Taken with my Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 L IS USM zoom lens at 400mm before the time it suffered a barrel-bending calamity on Market Street. RIP 1-4.)

So, it’s less pink than before, but still pretty pink. Here’s your view from the tower you can see on the right.

Oh, and then continue your tour by getting some umbrella drinks at the Halekulani Hotel‘s House Without a Key.

Then you’ll truly be kicking it old-school, Hawaiian-style.

808 State: Hawaii’s Kaena Point is Where the North Shore Ends – Circumnavigating Oahu is Only Possible on Foot

Tuesday, February 14th, 2012

Well here you go, you’ve already passed through the famous parts of the North Shore of Oahu, but you keep heading west until the semi-paved road turns to this, in Kaena Point State Park:

Click to expand

Here’s the birds-eye view, with the North Shore on the left side of the photo.

Alls that’s left to do is to hop out of your rental and then walk a few miles to go ’round the point by foot, why not?

After all, “Kaʻena Point is the “jumping-off” point for souls leaving this world.”

Put this one on your bucket list:

Kaʻena or Kaena Point is the westernmost tip of land on the island of Oʻahu. The point can be reached by foot from both the West (Waiʻanae Coast) and the East (Mokulēʻia) coastlines; walking in from the north side is recommended. An unimproved track extends some 3 miles (4.8 km) along the coast from the end of the paved road on the north side, where a gate prevents entry of all except authorized vehicles.

On the south side, at Kaʻena State Park, a paved road passes a beach before terminating into an unpaved road. It continues for a few miles, after which the road is washed out, and further travel must be on foot. It is not possible to travel around the point in a vehicle as the route is better described as a “path” in most places, and is lined on one side with a cliff and on the other with basalt rocks which are quite capable of damaging vehicles. The path is completely washed out in one place on the South side of the point and a rope helps hikers traverse the gap.

Aloha!

808 State: Oahu’s “Hitachi Tree” Certainly is Worth a Look the Next Time You Visit Hawaii

Monday, February 13th, 2012

This monkeypod in Honolulu’s five-star Yelp-rated Moanalua Gardens is quite an “exceptional tree,” don’t you think?

As it looked when I was there, on a slow day:

Click to expand

Check it out, next time you visit The Islands:

“The Hitachi tree, a large monkeypod tree with a distinctive umbrella-shaped canopy, grows in the middle of a grassy area in the middle of the park. The tree is registered as an exceptional tree by the City and County of Honolulu and cannot be removed or destroyed without city council approval.Japanese electronics manufacturer Hitachi, Ltd. has used the tree as a corporate symbol since 1973. An agreement between the Damon Estate and Hitachi gave Hitachi exclusive worldwide rights to use the tree’s image for promotional purposes in exchange for annual payments of US$20,000.”

David de Rothschild’s Somewhat Flaky Plastiki Expedition Finally Makes it to Australia

Monday, July 26th, 2010

Well, he and his Plastiki crew finally made it, all the way from Sausalito, California to Cindy, Australia. Let’s hear it for “heteronormative postmodern causeo-European hubris,” or something like that.

With some major repairs along the way and a friendly tow down the east coast of Oz, he eventually got the job done so you got to hand it to him.

Check the site, check the blog, check the Flickr.

As seen yesterday down under, in a darling little harbour:

via drexplore

All the way to the bottom, Davy. You made it!

Je vous lève le chapeau, Mr. de Rothschild.

Plastiki Approaching Island of Kiritimati After 35 Days Asea – Oprah Impressed

Friday, April 23rd, 2010

Here’s the update: Plastiki voyage leader David de Rothschild and crew are heading straight towards the northern Line Islands at a pace slower than walking.

Appears as if they’re slowly making a bee-line to tiny Teraina, Kiribati (aka Washington Island). Or Tabuaeran (Fanning Island) – that’s in the area as well. big old (bigger than San Francisco anyway) Kiritimati (aka Christmas Island)

Be sure to check out the action at Oprah.com.

DdR at the CAS last year:

Anyway, they said they would try for the Lines, and it looks like they’ll make it.

Stay tuned….

Catching Up With the Voyage of the Plastiki – Landfall Near Hawaii Expected Soon

Monday, April 12th, 2010

I don’t know, if Plastiki voyage leader David de Rothschild really were such a self-centered douchebag” “media hound, wouldn’t he be heading towards one of the Hawaiian islands, like Oahu or the Big One? (Numerous reports have stated that Hawaii is on the itinerary.) You know, there’d be a huge reception for him and his crew in ‘Lulu, with a concomitant media circus ‘n stuff.

But it appears as if the Plastiki is heading towards the nearby, not-all-that-populated Line Islands. So credit David for that, anyway.

See? San Francisco is off the map way up near the top right corner of your PC screen and the Hawaiian island chain is in the upper left corner of the graphic:

And do I blame him for skirting around the North Pacific Garbage Patch? Not really, for three reasons.

1. All them exposed two-litre bottles in the Plastiki’s hull make it the slowest pig on the high seas. And depending on conditions, that place isn’t the easiest to navigate through, so lots of extra time would be needed.

2. Garbage patch trekking’s been done already, by similar voyages; and

3. You can’t actually see the Garbage Patch – it looks like any other part of the Pacific. So, unless you are equipped for studying it, the whole place is kind of banal.

Anywho, I’m curious to see where this venture ends up. I’m quite confident this Andersonian craft  is seaworthy enough to make it all the way to Cindy, Australia, but how it gets there - that should be interesting.

The Plastiki plods along while the haters (“heteronormative postmodern causeo-European hubris”) hate. I’m thinking it’s still possible for David to beat the haters and win this one.

We’ll see.