Posts Tagged ‘officer’

THE FUTURE IS NOW: New “CITIZEN” App, fka “VIGILANTE”(!), Hits Frisco – Real Time Crime Reports on Your Smartphone

Friday, September 29th, 2017

FKA being, of course, Formerly Known As.

Anyway, this app is now operational and available in San Francisco.

Lets check it:

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Well, this certainly could be true late night at a 24/7 McD’s:

“MAN BRANDISHING KNIFE IN McDONALD’S”

So it seems to be working, FBOW.

Maybe in the future, it’ll let us know about nearby red balls, or brown:

A Surefire Way to Stop Crime at Infamous Haight and Stanyan: Simply Park an SFPD SUV and Officer on the Sidewalk There

Thursday, May 18th, 2017

I mean, right?

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Normally, this place is filled with people just hanging out, but I saw no one at all here at this time…

Better Know Your Bay Area Law Enforcement: The Glock 22-Equipped UNION PACIFIC POLICE – Modern-Day Pinkertons

Monday, April 3rd, 2017

I aint ever seen this, in all my years:

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TMYK:

“Union Pacific maintains a functioning police department staffed with officers given the title of Special Agent with jurisdiction over crimes against the railroad. Like most railroad police, its primary jurisdiction is unconventional, consisting of 54,116 miles (87,091 kilometers) of track in 23 western U.S. states. Railroad police are certified state law enforcement officers with investigative and arresting powers both on and off railroad property if authorized by the state they are operating within. They also have interstate authority pursuant to federal law (Title 49, United States Code, Section 28101. Under Public Law 110-53 SEC. 1526. (RAILROAD SECURITY ENHANCEMENTS)), Railroad police powers have been expanded to include railroads other than the officer’s employing agency. All of the states in Union Pacific’s 23 state system authorize full police authority, except for Minnesota and Wyoming, which do not grant authority to railroad police at all. Special Agents typically investigate major incidents such as derailments, sabotage, grade crossing accidents and hazardous material accidents and minor issues such as trespassing on the railroad right of way, vandalism/graffiti, and theft of company property or customer product. In accordance with their duties, Special Agents have the ability to access the FBI’s NCIC database to run suspects and vehicles for wants and warrants, as well as criminal history checks.”

Market Street, December

Friday, December 2nd, 2016

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Man with a Bicycle Instructs Owner of a 650-Horsepower Corvette “Supercar” How to Drive – But Get This: THE DRIVER LISTENS!

Tuesday, November 29th, 2016

IDK, is a Chevy Z06 a supercar? New GM seems to think so.

Anyway, as seen in Frisco’s Twitterloin / Tenderloin near the foot McAllister, amongst a sea of stolen bikes and untraceable bike parts, an SFPD bicycle officer lays down the law:

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SFPD LIDAR Enforcement, 4th and Fulton

Monday, November 28th, 2016

The signs say RADAR ENFORCED, but the new thing is LIDAR:

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An Endangered Species: The Solitary Squad Car Used by UC Hastings Law School “Public Safety Officers” in the Twitterloin

Wednesday, May 18th, 2016

This is it – they have just this one, as seen on McAllister:

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All the deets

“UC Hastings-UCSF Public Safety Partnership Proposal – Presenting the initial UC Hastings proposal to replace the college’s Public Safety Department with the University of California San Francisco Police Department.

A Public Meeting was held this morning to present the initial UC Hastings proposal to replace the college’s Public Safety Department with the University of California San Francisco Police Department (UCSFPD). All UC Hastings students, faculty, and staff were invited to attend.

UC Hastings General Counsel Elise Traynum welcomed attendees and introduced the proposal.

“The UC Hastings community is in need of additional protection which can only be provided by a police department,” said Traynum. “An advantage to entering into an agreement with UCSFPD is access to a broad array of basic police services and support services that the college cannot fund.”

“It is proposed that UCSFPD would handle all street patrols, investigations, and crime prevention services, emergency management functions in the event of life-threatening disasters, homeland security and related community policing responsibilities,” said Traynum.

Traynum also outlined options for the five affected UC Hastings Public Safety officer’s unit members, listing four possibilities: 1) Officers may be hired as police officers for UCSFPD if they meet requisite qualifications; or 2) Officers may be hired as security guards, or security guard supervisors, for UCSFPD if they meet required qualifications; or, 3) Officers may be hired for positions at UC Hastings if they meet requisite qualifications; or, 4) for Officers who do not qualify for jobs with the UCSFPD or alternative position with UC Hastings, or officers who elect to not apply for these, the College would consider buying them out, at an amount to be determined.

Finally, Traynum underscored that reducing labor costs is not the motivation for contracting out public safety. “The motivation for contracting out public safety is to give the UC Hastings community access to a broad array of basic police services and support services that the college could not fund.”

UCSFPD Chief Mike Denson then presented “A Study of a Public Safety Partnership” (click here to view), and highlighted the department’s commitment to safety and security externally and internally, including the physical and emotional well-being of students.

Time for public comment was provided following the presentation, and the UC Hastings Public Safety Officers Association (PSOA) and representatives were also offered the opportunity to present a counter proposal at the meeting.

Acting Chancellor & Dean David Faigman called the input “enormously helpful” and laid out two basic principles he and the college will follow in making this decision. First, that any change would be to create a more secure and safer campus. Second, that UC Hastings will do the best we can for our current officers. He also noted that UC Hastings does not plan to raise tuition to improve safety and security. “If in the end it doesn’t make sense for our campus, we’re not going to do it,” concluded Faigman. “And if it does, we’ll do so in a conscientious manner.”

The college will hold a follow-up public meeting in April to present its final proposal. Details will be publicized widely.

MEDIA CONTACT
Alex A.G. Shapiro
Director of External Relations
UC Hastings College of the Law
Office: (415) 581-8842
Cell: (415) 813-9214
Email: shapiroa@uchastings.edu

Local Discussion of the Police Shooting of Akai Gurley in New York: “CPA and AAAJ-ALC Statement on Peter Liang”

Monday, February 22nd, 2016

Here’s what our local Chinese Progressive Association and Asian Americans Advancing Justice-Asian Law Caucus have to say about the shooting of Akai Gurley in East New York – read the press release after the jump.

Its POV differs from others about town, one might note.

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It Takes A Village (of Transit Cops) to Hand Out MUNI Citations – A Baker’s Dozen Wait and Wait and Then Welcome to the Financh

Thursday, September 3rd, 2015

And actually, these people don’t hand out all that many tickets:

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Training Day, one supposes.

Classic Photo from Market Street: Shoplifter, Image of Shirtless Abercrombie & Fitch Model, SFPD Officer

Wednesday, September 2nd, 2015

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