Posts Tagged ‘older’

Popping Up All Over San Francisco: Do Those New Lower-Case “Clearview” Streets Signs Bother You? – Well, Not Me

Monday, July 9th, 2012

I know these new signs upset some people, but not me.

Anyway, here they are: 

Click to expand

And they just changed the design not too long ago – here’s something from 2008.

But Matt Fuller seems to like the new lower-case lettering.

Hurray for the new street signs, I guess.

RAND Corporation Study: Older Americans are Less Healthy than Older English People, But Americans Live Longer

Thursday, November 4th, 2010

Here’s some news from our RAND Corporation:

“Older Americans are less healthy than their English counterparts, but they live as long or even longer than their English peers, according to a new study by researchers from the RAND Corporation and the Institute for Fiscal Studies in London.

Researchers found that while Americans aged 55 to 64 have higher rates of chronic diseases than their peers in England, they died at about the same rate. And Americans age 65 and older — while still sicker than their English peers — had a lower death rate than similar people in England, according to findings published in the journal Demography.

The paper was co-authored by James Banks and Alastair Muriel of the Institute for Fiscal Studies and James P. Smith, distinguished chair in labor markets and demographic studies at RAND.

If you get sick at older ages, you will die sooner in England than in the United States,” Smith said. “It appears that at least in terms of survival at older ages with chronic disease, the medical system in the United States may be better than the system in England.”

Mmmm…

iconRead Article at muse.jhu.edu
iconPopulation and Aging Research Area

Are Older Drivers a Menace on the Roads? RAND Corporation Says No – Are “Autonomous Cars” in Our Future?

Thursday, October 21st, 2010

Our RAND Corporation has a spirited defense of older drivers posted today. Check it:

“Many stop driving in part because they fear they might injure someone else. But the reality is that older drivers themselves are almost six times more likely to be injured in an automobile accident than are drivers ages 25-64. Thus, older drivers face a much greater risk of being harmed from the actions of younger drivers than the other way around.”

So, take that, South Park:

A scene from Grey Dawn

And it looks like cars that can drive themselves is In Our Future:

“Promoting technological innovations, such as autonomous vehicles, that promise to reduce accident rates overall while simultaneously providing older individuals who can no longer drive safely an alternative means of transportation, is likely to have the single greatest impact on the safety and well-being of older drivers and passengers.”

O.K then, learned something new today…

As H1N1 Fears Subside, UCSF Hospitals are Once Again Open to Visiting Children

Wednesday, March 10th, 2010

Those kids crowding Moffitt Cafe at UCSF Medical Center / Children’s Hospital will now have Run of the House, more or less, ’cause the restrictions against child visitors just got eliminated. So, as of yesterday, the place is, once again, totally wide open, more or less, to visitors aged 15 and less. 

Not sure what other local hospitals are thinking these days, but UCSF says that Influenza activity has decreased considerably lately. Read all about it, below.

Godzilla menaces this huge architect’s model of UCSF under a glass box, so he’s always safe from H1N1. But runaway tow trucks, well, that’s a different story:

Moffitt Cafe is now released from its ragamuffin daycare role so it can return to being a haven for law students, a place of escape where legal scholars are free to hit on medical and pharmacological students and/or professionals in a target-rich environment. (At least that’s how the cafeteria was used back in the 90′s.)

Forthwith, the News of the Day:

UCSF Lifts Hospital Visitor Policy Restricting Children

March 09, 2010

UCSF Medical Center and UCSF Children’s Hospital are lifting their visitor age restriction, which prohibited visitors younger than 16 years old. The visitor policy is being lifted effective March 9, 2010.

Dr. Joshua Adler, chief medical officer at UCSF, said he believes the policy, implemented in November, and other strategies, such as vaccination of UCSF personnel, helped reduce the risk of hospital-acquired influenza.

Influenza activity has decreased considerably so that risk is now quite low, Adler said. In the hospital units where age restrictions are not usually in place, children now may visit. Unit-specific age restrictions, such as those in the intensive care units, may remain in effect, according to unit-based policy.

A requirement, however, remains in effect until March 31 that health care workers, who have not been vaccinated against both H1N1 and seasonal influenza, must wear a surgical mask while in patient care areas.

Adler thanked employees for their diligent infection control measures during the flu season. Record numbers of UCSF employees, faculty, residents, and students received flu vaccines this year, he said.

The San Francisco Public Library Invites Older Adults to Mental Aerobics Starting Jan. 25th

Thursday, January 7th, 2010

Our San Francisco Public Library will soon be offering weekly drop-in Mental Aerobics classes at the Main Branch in Civic Center beginning Jan. 25:

Location: Main Library Latino/Hispanic A
Address:100 Larkin St. (at Grove)
Library Sponsored Public Program
Event Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Description:
A free class offered for seniors by the Older Adults Department of the City College of San Francisco, in association with Access Services of SFPL. Classes will be on Monday afternoons, from January 25 – May 24, 2010.
 
 
 
via Austin Kleon
  
All the deets: 

Exercise Your Brain at the San Francisco Public Library
 
Weekly drop-in Mental Aerobics class beginning Jan. 25 through May 24

 

San Francisco Public Library has joined forces with the Older Adults Department of City College of San Francisco to present Mental Aerobics, a weekly free mental exercise class for the brain beginning later this month.
 
The old saying “use it or lose it” applies as much to the brain as it does to any other muscle in the body. In this very social class, Hope Levy, a member of City College’s Older Adults Department since 2003, will lead attendees through fun, challenging and creative brain exercises designed to maintain and improve cognitive vitality and memory.
 
Levy will present ways of conquering everyday memory challenges, such as remembering names and “tip-of-the-tongue syndrome.” She will also discuss the latest news on mental fitness. She stresses this course is appropriate for first-timers as well as those who have previously attended a memory and mental fitness program.
 
Beginning Jan. 25 and running through May 24, classes will be held at the Main Library on Mondays from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.  (Note: no class will be held on Feb 15 or March 29.) All classes will be held in the Main Library’s Latino/Hispanic Community Meeting Room on the lower level. Library patrons can take one class, the entire series or pick and choose from among the classes. Simply show up and fill out a registration form at the class.
 
Levy has more than 20 years of teaching experience. She holds masters degrees in Gerontology and Special Education, both from San Francisco State University. Through her work, Levy promotes positive aging through her passion for lifelong learning.
 
The Older Adults Department of City College offers classes designed for adults 55 or older, though all are welcome to attend. For additional information about the Mental Aerobics class, contact Hope Levy at (415) 931-8679 or
hopelevy@yahoo.com.
 
Mental Aerobics is part of SFPL’s Wise Up! program, a series of classes and events for learning and living well at any age.

Press Release of the Week: “Want to Help Your Job Hunt? Win a Facelift!”

Tuesday, May 12th, 2009

Oh boy, here we go. On the heels of the Murphy-Goode-Winery-you’re-out-of-a-job-so-send-in-your-one-minute-video-to-win-a-$60K-temp-gig-but-really-we-just-want-to-get-our-name out-there construct comes the Dr. David-W.-Kim-you’re-out-of-a-job-so-send-in-your-one-minute-video-to-win-a-facelift-procedure-but-really-we-just-want-to-get-our-name out-there follow-up.

Five star Yelp-rated, straight-out-of-UCSF David W. Kim, M.D., FACS is waiting for your video – don’t disappoint. Or just read below to give your laugh lines a workout, you unemployed geezer.

Want to Help Your Job Hunt? Win a Facelift!

Dr. David W. Kim Announces the Jobseekers Facelift Giveaway Contest

SAN FRANCISCO, May 12 /PRNewswire/ — Sympathetic to the older job applicant, Dr. David W. Kim has established a Jobseekers Facelift Giveaway Contest. As millions compete for a limited number of jobs, older applicants (those over 40) see facial surgery and non-invasive treatments as a way to stay competitive with younger applicants. “Of course, one’s accomplishments should set one apart, but in our culture a youthful appearance is highly valued,” begins Dr. David W. Kim, former Chief of Facial and Reconstructive Surgery at University of California Medical, San Francisco. “Many matured individuals feel at a real disadvantage interviewing with wrinkles, jowls or bags under their eyes.” The San Francisco Surgery Center and anesthesiologist, Bill Spina MD, will partner with Dr. Kim to provide a facelift and treatments to one deserving winning contestant.

“My practice is in San Francisco,” begins Dr. Kim, “and with 1 out of 11 Californians out of work, I have an increasing number of older unemployed patients who want facial surgery before they start interviewing.” He is not alone. According to the Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons over 2/3 of their members believe that jobseekers are the largest industry trend for 2009.

But does facial rejuvenation really help in getting a job?  A tremendous amount of research has proven that physical attractiveness is an advantage. “Every culture advances those who carry that culture’s desired traits,” says Dr. David W. Kim. “In our culture, prominent signs of aging are usually detrimental in getting a job.”

A firm believer in a natural facial outcome as opposed to a cookie cutter effect, Dr. David W. Kim is the author of 57 papers on beautywith his most recent appearing in March/April JAMA’s Archives of Facial and Reconstructive Surgery.  He is a sought after speaker who has appeared at over 50 conferences from Seoul to Dubai and is a frequent television medical expert. His remarkable facial reconstructive work was a Discovery Television feature.

To enter, contestants can send their Why A Facelift Will Help Me Get Work story, in 250 words or less and attach a facial photo by email to: drkim@dwkimmd.com or by mail to Dr. David W. Kim, 490 Post Street, Suite 933, San Francisco, CA 94102.  They are also encouraged to supplement their entry by posting up to a one-minute video on YouTube and emailing the URL link to drkim@dwkimmd.com.

Dr. Kim will be accepting applications from May 15th through June 15th.  You can learn more about Dr. Kim at www.dwkimmd.com.  The winner will be informed by June 19, 2009.

 Dr. David W. Kim is available for interviews