Posts Tagged ‘Organizations’

Instead of Paying Its Taxes, Twitter Offers Up a “Safer 6th Street” Focus Group This Saturday at Noon

Thursday, May 16th, 2013

Here’s what 6th and Stevenson is like today

Auweia – click to expand

…and here’s the vision for its future, below.

So, just as the horrible SFMTA recently conducted focus groups on the future of Polk, 6th Street is getting its turn.

I’ll tell you, if I were in charge of making 6th street safer, I don’t think I’d put  “Slower Cars” at the top of the list.

How about “Less Untreated Mental Illness” instead?

Anyway, our blessed SFMTA will be  hosting “an interactive activation project on 6th Street (between Market and Stevenson)” on May 18th, 2013.

And Twitter will be there too, sort of.

In a better world, Twitter would participate because it wants to, not because it’s contractually obligated to do so.

(And Twitter would pay its fair share of taxes under the rules signed into law by that wild job-killing radical, Gavin Newsom, all the way back in 2004.  Twitter, just give me your tax returns and I’ll figure how much more you should have paid and then you can write a check for the difference and send it in to the General Fund.)

NEWSFLASH: The people from the residential hotels you don’t like on 6th Street aren’t going anywhere.

By law.

Oh, and lots of people working at Twitter would still prefer to labor in northern San Mateo County, just saying.

Anyway, on with the show:

Slower Cars. More sidewalk space. More mid-block crossings. Brighter lighting. Cleaner streets. These are among the ideas and desires recently expressed by the local community for a safer 6th Street.

Safer 6th Street is a collaboration between SFMTA, District 6 Supervisor’s Office, Twitter, Neighborland, SPUR, URBAN SPACEship and other community organizations to address the issue of safety in the 6th Street corridor, and gather further input from the local community as to what can be done to create a safer area for residents, workers and passersby alike.

There is an on-going community process to implement safety measures in the 6th Street corridor, including:

Sixth Street Improvement Project led by SFMTA, for permanent traffic calming and pedestrian improvements in the corridor

Supervisor Jane Kim’s District 6 Pedestrian Safety Workgroup, which has been advocating for traffic calming on Sixth Street for the past several years

- Activation projects led by the Mayor’s Office of Economic Workforce and Development

- The recent establishment of The Sixth Street Safety Hub, an SFPD sub-station

In alignment with this process, we ask – how can we, as a community, create a safer 6th Street?

On Saturday, May 18th, between 12-6pm we will be hosting an interactive activation project on 6th Street (between Market and Stevenson), to engage the community and gather ideas and feedback towards this question, with the aim of envisioning a vibrant area and helping to prioritize treatments to the 6th Street design.

Pick your medium – we’ll have a Neighborland board for you to freely write on, a Twitter photo booth, and a collaborative mural installed by ArtIsMobilus.

Until then, share your ideas and comment on others here or on Twitter using the hashtag #safer6th. Through a new integrated platform between Neighborland and Twitter, your tweets will display on the Question page. Any tweets that start with “I want …” and contain the hashtag will auto-magically become ideas on the Question page.

Come join and take part in creating action on the ground!”

Craigslist Founder Craig Newmark Releases Infographic Detailing the Use of Social Media by Nonprofits

Thursday, October 13th, 2011

Now, I myself can’t see Craig’s infographic cause I’m not on the Facebook, but you, well go ahead and “like” him and then you’ll be rewarded by getting to see what Craig wants to show you.

A photo from his FB:

Click to expand

All the deets:

“SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 13, 2011 — Craig Newmark, founder of craigslist and craigconnects, today released an infographic detailing the use of social media by leading nonprofit organizations. The infographic is available for viewing on Newmark’s Facebook page at http://on.fb.me/r7pm9H

“How the Top 50 Nonprofits Do Social Media” is a fact-filled, comprehensive look at which leading nonprofit organizations are most proactively and effectively using social media channels of communication like Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Flickr, LinkedIn, and RSS feeds.

Do the highest earning nonprofits use social media the most effectively? Are they the most engaging? How are people responding and interacting? The infographic is intended to help answer those questions.

Findings revealed by the infographic include:

– 92 percent of the top 50 nonprofits have at least one social media
presence on their website homepage.
— PBS is the nonprofit organization with the most followers on Twitter -
840,653.
— The nonprofit following the most people on Twitter is the American
Cancer Society – 200,522.
— The American Red Cross was the first organization on the list to create
a Twitter account.
— Food for the Poor is the most talkative nonprofit on the list on
Facebook, and has posted 220 posts over the course of two months.
— The organization with the highest net income, the YMCA, only posted 19
times to Facebook in two months, but has over 24,000 fans.

Newmark, who often speaks at conferences on the value of social media outreach for nonprofits, said it appears that income does not increase a nonprofit’s visibility and interactions in the social media world. As shown on the infographic, some of the most social media savvy organizations are in the bottom quarter bracket in terms of income, yet they are clearly active on social media.

“The deal is, it’s not about money, it’s about getting people to talk with each other to make people’s lives better,” said Newmark.

Visit Newmark’s Facebook page for the infographic, which includes an explanation of the methodology and sources used in its development.

craigconnects is Newmark’s personal, Web-based initiative aimed at helping people work together for the common good using the Internet. The initiative spotlights organizations and agencies working in the areas of veterans and military families, public diplomacy, open government, back-to-basics journalism, consumer protection, and the use of technology for the common good. For more information, visit http://www.craigconnects.org

Oh, and here’s Craig’s sked, if you want to keep up with him:

10/29 OR Net Impact
11/2 SF Innovation Uncensored
11/9 NY IAVA Gala
11/17-18 NY Next Gen Charity

Seantor Leland Yee Reforms Criminal Background Check Policy for Youth Organizations

Monday, March 2nd, 2009

Over in Sacramento, San Mateo and San Francisco Counties’ very own Senator Leland Yee, PhD is still busy, busy, busy with new bills.

Senate Bill SB447 is no-brainer about reforming criminal background check policies for California youth organizations. It’s only a matter of time before this one becomes law. Read on below and after the jump. 

Bill would Reform Criminal Background Check Policy for Youth Organizations
Yee’s legislation would help protect children in youth programs from predators, violent criminals

SACRAMENTO – Last week, Senator Leland Yee (D-San Francisco/San Mateo) introduced legislation to help protect children involved in youth organizations from sexual predators and other violent criminals.  Senate Bill 447 would reform the criminal background check policy at the approximately 36,000 youth organizations and human resource agencies across the state that work with children and vulnerable populations. 
 
Such organizations, including the Boy Scouts and youth soccer leagues, are currently required to conduct criminal background checks of their staff and members.  Each group appoints a “Custodian of Records” to review the background checks for their organization and assess if a person’s criminal history poses a potential danger to the population the agency or organization serves.
 
However, there is a dangerous loophole in the law.  The Custodian of Records also reviews his or her own criminal record that is sent to the group by the California Department of Justice (DOJ).  This loophole may result in an individual who has been convicted of a violent crime or crimes against children serving as the Custodian of Records without others in the agency being aware of his/her criminal history.
 
“SB 447 will help protect children from predators and other violent criminals by closing an obvious loophole in the law,” said Yee.  “Those determining who can work with children should not be reviewing their own records and determining if they are fit to serve.  Parents deserve assurance that their kids are safe when they are dropped off at a soccer practice or scouts meeting.”
 
Specifically, SB 447 will close this loophole by creating a program in which the DOJ will review the criminal record information for Custodian of Records applicants and confirm if they are suited for the position. The DOJ will ensure that the people appointed to this position do not have a felony or any offense involving moral turpitude, dishonesty, or fraud. The program will be funded by a $30 fee for all Custodian of Records applicants.
 
In 1997, a student at Rio Linda High School was raped and murdered by a temporary janitor with a previous criminal record, including two strikes for voluntary manslaughter and armed robbery.  At the time, another loophole in state law existed that did not require temporary or substitute employees to go through criminal background checks.  The brutal murder of Michelle Montoya prompted the Legislature to change state law – banning the hiring of felons and requiring complete background checks of all school employees, including temporary and substitute workers.
 
“Unfortunately, it took the loss of an innocent life for the law to change regarding temporary school employees,” said Yee.  “It is vital that we are proactive and close the loophole regarding Custodians of Records before we have another unnecessary tragedy.”

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