Posts Tagged ‘overlook’

Red Star, Sausalito, CA

Tuesday, February 7th, 2012

Yowzer:

Via Joe Azure - click to expand

The Happy, Jumping, Rubber-Chicken-Loving Dogs of Marin County

Wednesday, August 24th, 2011

The Marin Headlands overlook near the Golden Gate Bridge was the site of Pico the Dog’s rubber chicken photo shoot.

Here’s the update - 150K views so far…

Click to expand:

Via mylerdude, click to expand.

Keep jumping, Pico!

A View of San Francisco’s Market Street From the Ferry Building to the Castro

Tuesday, July 14th, 2009

As everybody knows, Market Street is straight until it hits the Castro. See for yourself as you follow it from the Ferry Building (once the second-highest building in town) all the way to the Giant Gay Pride Flag of the Castro District, the biggest in the world they say.

This is almost the view you get from the Twin Peaks Overlook up on Christmas Tree Road – the second highest point in San Francisco:

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And click below for a closer look. Can you see the historic street cars and the bike riders?

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Sure you can. Just scroll around.

The Presidio’s Newest Trail – the 1000-Step Immigrant Point/Coastal Connector

Tuesday, February 10th, 2009

Now up in Marin, you go to the hoosegow if you start trailblazing on public lands. But in San Francisco, the authoritahs are more understanding. They’ll talk about how you forged a “social” or “non-designated” trail, and then they’ll go and spend time and effort to make it proper.

As is the case in the Presidio, with the recent unveiling of the winding, “ass-kicking” Immigrant Point/Coastal Connector, a so-called 1000 Steps Trail. (Really, it’s only just 808 footsteps directly down from the Immigrant Point Overlook on Washington to the nude area of Baker Beach via the sand ladder trail, but oh well.)

From the Immigrant Point Overlook on Washington Boulevard. Click to expand

You should check it out. The top part is just like a stair-stepping machine, except you’re outdoors in the fresh air. How unnatural.

The map link is above, here is the map. The trail starts on the south side of the Overlook on Washington Blvd and then winds down to Lincoln Blvd. (This photo is from before the recent changes, so you can’t see all of the new trail, FYI) From there, you can go wherever you want on Lincoln. The sand ladder to the nude part of Baker Beach is on the left:

Click to expand.

See you there!

More deets after the jump.

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The Happy, Jumping, Rubber-Chicken-Loving Dogs of Marin County

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2009

The Marin Headlands overlook near the Golden Gate Bridge was the site of Pico the Dog’s rubber chicken photo shoot.

Click to expand:

via mylerdude, 120K views so far…

Keep jumping, Pico!

The Presidio Trust Releases Its Year-End Report for 2008.

Thursday, January 29th, 2009

You know the Presidio, right? It’s that scary place that Bill O’Reilly wouldn’t dream of visiting at night. But take a look for yourself by opening up Today at the Presidio, the Presidio Trust 2008 Year-End Report, aka Fiscal Year 2008 Annual Report (with Performance & Accountability Report), It’s loaded with photos, anyway.

Here’s something new for 2008, the Crissy Field Overlook:

But here’s something that hasn’t changed at all in 2008 – the Main Post Theatre on Moraga is still closed, in part due to opposition from owners of other movie theatres. (Rather like like how Mike Dell might object to the opening of an Apple Store, non?) No matter, the San Francisco Film Society still dreams of reopening the joint and having festivals ‘n stuff.

Last year also saw plans change for the proposed Contemporary Art Museum Presidio (CAMP) project. Gluckman Mayner is no longer on the job, but some locals are finishing up the details on a new approach right now.

So there you have it.

Presidio Trust Unveils 2008 Year-End Report
Today at the Presidio Highlights the Many Ways People Use the Park

Presidio of San Francisco (January 29, 2009) – The Presidio Trust has released its year-end report for 2008, detailing how the agency has managed the largest historic preservation effort currently underway in the country, offered cultural events and programs, created new recreational opportunities, and fostered a growing community. Today at the Presidio focuses on the everyday ways that people – those who live, work, and visit – are experiencing the 1,500-acre park.
 
The Presidio is celebrating its 15th year as a national park.
 
“I am pleased to share the significant achievements from the past year and proud of the contributions made by our board members, staff and volunteers,” said Craig Middleton, executive director of the Presidio Trust.  “We are particularly proud of the how the community has evolved and the growth in number of people who enjoy the park – working, living and recreating here. Community life has truly returned to the Presidio.”
 
Using a “day in the life” approach, the report highlights the ways people enjoy the diverse activities available in the park – daily occurrences such as residents commuting on the free PresidiGo Shuttle in early morning, to high school students conducting a science class at Baker Beach during the day, to docents training for public events in the evening.
 
The “performance and accountability” section focuses on the sound fiscal performance driven by strong demand for residential and commercial leased property. Progress on plans to revitalize the Main Post and communicate its historic significance, the historic rehabilitation of the former Public Health Service Hospital district into residential units, trail and scenic overlook improvements, new volunteer opportunities, and enhanced public access to the park are also detailed in the report.
 
The full report is available on the Presidio Trust website at http://www.presidio.gov/trust/documents/AnnualReports.htm.
 
The Presidio Trust was established by the United States Congress in 1996 to manage the Presidio of San Francisco, a former Army base located at the base of the Golden Gate Bridge. The 1,500-acre site contains the infrastructure of a small community as well as expansive open space, a 300-acre historic forest, spectacular views, and rare and endangered plants and wildlife. It comprises nearly 6 million square feet of buildings, including 469 historic structures that contribute to its status as a National Historic Landmark District, making it unlike any other national park. www.presidio.gov

The Shiny Shiny Top of San Francisco’s TransAmerica Pyramid

Friday, December 19th, 2008

Well, lookie here at the shiny, shiny top of the Transamerica Pyramid. Now, of course, at night during some special times (your November-December-New Year’s holiday mish-mash plus the Fourth of July) you can see an electric light up there, (as seen here on the far left). 

But this shot wasn’t taken at nightime. That’s the noonday sun shining off of the westward face of the four-yard-tall mini-pyramid that tops the whole shebang.

Click to expand:. A seen from the brand spanking new Crissy Field Overlook in the Presidio:   

Here’s a better look in black and white from the same angle just a few minutes later:

Of course, you can still see the reflected light but the intensity is about a hundred times less than the direct reflection seen in the colour photo.

It’s probably a polished metal panel up there, possibly aluminum.

Look for the Star of the Pyramid - you just might see it someday, if the sun lines up just right.

The Presidio’s Crissy Field Overlook is Now Open

Wednesday, July 23rd, 2008

The Presidio Trust and the Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy opened another overlook today: 

The Crissy Field Overlook is the third major vista point to be completed in the Presidio. The Overlook is part of a program to nearly double the size of the Presidio’s trail system and create new ways for the community to experience the Presidio’s great outdoors. The stone plaza features views of the waterfront, San Francisco Bay, Alcatraz, and the San Francisco skyline. The Overlook was supported by a generous gift from the Evelyn and Walter Haas, Jr. Fund.

Click to expand:

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You don’t need a car to get up there, so check it out