Posts Tagged ‘parnassus’

It’s the “CIRM Worm” in Situ – San Francisco’s Craziest Building is at UCSF – Hanging Off of Mount Sutro

Friday, January 24th, 2014

See it on the right?

Click to expand

All the deets.

Hey MUNI, Your Thing is Up! A #6 Parnassus Driver Tools Down Market With An Access Panel Propped Open – Peds Beware

Wednesday, May 8th, 2013

This wasn’t a sidelined bus waiting for help to get back on the road. No no, this was an operating #6 Parnassus heading inbound on Market just the other day.

San Francisco’s infamous jaywalking* peds will now need to keep an eye out for this kind of thing:

Click to expand

*Uh, jaywalking isn’t illegal because of Big Oil. No no, jaywalking is illegal because Big Government wants to protect you from killing yourself. Yet another conspiracy theory debunked…

Second Annual Art Day at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital a Huge Success – A Red Carpet Fashion Show

Wednesday, November 16th, 2011

Get all the deets on this special day at UCSF below.

The red carpet up at 505 Parnassus:

Just after the unveiling:

Click to expand

“Members of the UCSF community are invited to celebrate the second annual Art Day at the UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital on Wednesday, Nov. 16, featuring a red carpet fashion show with hospital gowns completely redesigned by young hospital patients.

All of the creations are designed by the kids, and will be modeled by a mix of staff and patients. Other activities include a photo booth, where patients can insert themselves into famous works of art, and professional artists who will share their artistic processes.

“Re-designing the hospital gowns gives these kids an opportunity to share their feelings about what the hospital gowns mean to them and what they signify,” said UCSF Child Life Services Manager Michael Towne. “The kids are allowed to feel and actively express the way they want to.”

The art therapy program at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital provides a creative way for children and their families to communicate and better cope with their hospital experience. Art therapy encourages patient engagement, expression and an increased understanding of the emotional impact of illness and medical treatment.

The Child Life Department recognizes the integral role hospital child life programs play in the healing process and works with children, teens and their families to ensure that each child’s developmental and emotional needs are met.

“Patients need a forum to express what it means to have cancer, or cystic fibrosis or to have experienced a major trauma,” said Towne. “The whole issue of illness has a profound impact on a person’s identity, and awareness of mortality. And sometimes, all the words in the world aren’t going to capture what’s going on.”

Fashion Show

WHEN: Wednesday, Nov. 16 from 2 to 4 p.m.

WHERE: UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital, 505 Parnassus Ave., Sixth Floor Courtyard”

Oh Hell Yes: UCSF Allows Emergency Room Check-In Online – Wait Just 15 Minutes with InQuickER Service at Parnassus

Tuesday, July 26th, 2011

The average wait for an emergency room visit at UCSF‘s Parnassus Heights campus is 4.5 hours for people with mild medical emergencies? Wow.

Wouldn’t it be nicer to pay $5 to check-in online and then wait at home rather than in the ER?

That’s what UCSF thinks.

Check it:

“UCSF patients with minor medical needs seeking treatment in the Emergency Department now can make an appointment to be seen – waiting at home rather in the hospital – via a new online check-in service called InQuickER.

UCSF Medical Center
UCSF Medical Center is now offering patients with mild medical emergencies a chance to reserve a time to be seen in the Emergency Department using a new online system.

UCSF Medical Center’s Emergency Department (ED) at Parnassus Heights is now offering InQuickER designed for patients with non-threatening minor medical needs.

UCSF patients can register online for a $4.99 fee and pick an open slot for an emergency room visit. The fee will be refunded if they’re not seen within 15 minutes.

In April, UCSF did a trial run with the online service, which 22 people used. UCSF Medical Center launched the system a few weeks ago.

“One thing we encountered during the trial was that a lot of patients were using it inappropriately,” said Jennifer Dearman, the Emergency Department’s patient care manager. “The online registration is screened by ED nurses and we have had to advise some patients to come directly to the ED. This service is for a fast-track kind of patient.”

“For example, a cancer patient on chemotherapy with a fever can have complicated issues and should be seen in the regular ED, so InQuickER is not appropriate for that person.”

Waiting at Home vs. Hospital

About 105 patients a day visit the emergency room at UCSF Medical Center on the Parnassus campus, Dearman said, and the average time between arrival and departure, for those not admitted to the hospital, is four-and-a-half hours.

That’s in keeping with the average wait in 2009 for ER patients throughout California: four hours and 34 minutes –  27 minutes longer than the U.S. average, according to a 2010 report by health care consulting firm Press Ganey.

Dearman said patient satisfaction was the main reason UCSF Medical Center adopted InQuickER. “It also helps us control the flow,” she said. “The general population doesn’t think the emergency room ever has slow times. But it does.”

UCSF is one of 55 health care facilities in 13 states partnering with InQuickER, said spokesman Chris Song. The service, based in Nashville, began in 2006 after its founder, Tyler Kiley, had to go to an emergency room and spent hours witnessing stasis and frustration.

“He just thought there had to be a better way,” Song said. “With our service, you still have to wait but you get to do it somewhere else. Like on your couch instead of being surrounded by other sick people.”

Song said InQuickerER provides patients with convenience, comfort and some level of control. And it allows emergency department staff to know who’s coming and what symptoms they have, so that they can better prepare.

“It can help reduce the burden of peak times and spread it out,” Song said. “It creates more efficiency and a better environment in the waiting room.”

So far, more than 10,000 people have used the service; 95 percent have been seen within the 15-minute window. In a triage situation, of course, even people who have registered will have to wait. When there are delays, users are notified through text messages and emails with updated projections on treatment times.

The service is available online at https://ucsfmedicalcenter.inquicker.com/. It is growing rapidly, Song said, which is not surprising: A study led by San Francisco General Hospital emergency physician Renee Hsia, MD, MSc, found that the number of hospital-based emergency departments in the United States is declining, despite an increase in the number of patients seeking emergency care.

The study by Hsia, an assistant professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine in the UCSF School of Medicine, was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in May. It reported that 27 percent of urban and suburban emergency rooms have closed in the last two decades.”

Hurray!

Our Crazy New CIRM-Worm Building Seems to be Fitting In Nicely up at UCSF Parnassus

Tuesday, June 7th, 2011

See it on the right up there?

Click to expand

Well, not really.

But read all about the craziest new building in California after the jump.

(more…)

Finally: Some Good Photos of the Ray and Dagmar Dolby Regeneration Medicine CIRM WORM Building at UCSF

Thursday, April 14th, 2011

Now I took some shots of the Ray and Dagmar Dolby Regeneration Medicine CIRM WORM Building at UCSF over Turkey Day weekend last year as I was coming down the hill, but, at long last, let’s see some good photos from Rafael Viñoly Architects.

Right here.

That’s what it looks like.

Click to expand

For the record….

Rockslide at Quintara and 12th Avenue: Innocent Lincoln Mark VIII Totally Pwned in the Sunset District This AM

Saturday, March 26th, 2011

See? Pwned.

Nice, non-cliquish Mike Billings of the San Francisco Examiner has the deets.

MBillings

And famous area photographer Jim M. Goldstein of JMG Galleries was on the scene as well – here’s his gallery.

Look out for those landslides, InSetters!

“At 0839 hrs today, 2 boulders fell from a hill and landed on 2 unoccupied vehicles in a residential neighborhood. There were no reported injuries from this incident.

Quintara between Cragmont and 12th Avenue will remained closed until 24 hours after the rains have stopped. The 6 Parnassus bus line will continue a switch back at 14th Avenue and Noriega. DEM will monitor the situation until 24 hours after the rains have stopped.”

UCSF’s CIRM Worm Building Officially Opens Today – Read All About it from Critic John King

Wednesday, February 9th, 2011

You know what I think? I think that it’s easier to teach a newspaper writer how to take photos than it is to teach a newspaper photographer how to write. So if you had to choose and you could only afford to send one person, you’d give a camera and send the writer, right?

That’s something to think about when you look at John King’s bits at SFGate. He does a fine job with photography on his own. Maybe even better?

Just saying.

Here’s a retread from last year. I think the new Mayor will be on the scene today to kick things off.

What’s the Next Big Thing in stem cell research? It’s got to be UCSF‘s shiny, brand-spanking-new, 700-foot-long Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research (CIRMbuilding from New Yawk-based Rafael Vinoly Architects.

Check it:

“The $123 million building is a series of split-level floors with terraced grass roofs and solar orientation. Open labs flow into each other, with office/interaction areas located on the circulation route between the labs, allowing for the entire research community in the building to interact.”

It’s the CIRM Worm! See?

Click to expand

It was the Modern Steel Construction Magazine cover girl earlier this year, or something, so that’s something to crow about.

As planned:

But this low-rise monster, in real life, somehow looks like:

An RV;

A boat;

A millipede; and

A Jawa Sandcrawler

And all at the same time.

Researchers have already moved in so let’s take a look why not.

Here’s the view coming up Medical Center Drive. This thing looks as if it will spring to life at any moment and start marching towards Parnassus, or Irving, to swallow a an N Judah or two:

This is how you build in Earthquake Country:

This is all the way up the hill where Med Center takes a hairpin. Kind of looks like an RV. Anterior Region in Lateral View:

Looking down the hill:

The clitellum:

And here, it sort of looks like a boat. See how it’s moored to Mount Sutro? (And hey, UCSF. Did you leave all the lights on for the entire four-day Thanksgiving weekend? O.K. fine.)

And here’s the gap betwixt floors:

Look through and you can see the ocean! (Or the bay, or the Golden Gate, or the estuary, whatever…)

Here’s the view from the roof, more or less, with a nice view of The Richmond and our Golden Gate Bridge

And here’s what we were promised, up on the roof:

And here’s what we got, it’s like weeds and International Orange chairs:

Maybe they’re still working on the vegetation.

And speaking of orange chairs, the theme continues inside:

Now, don’t fret about them concomitant radioactive materials up near the top…

…cause they have a nice outdoor shower to wash ‘em all away, Silkwood-style:

Leave us now depart the CIRM Worm:

Bon Courage, CIRM people!

They had a big party for the groundbreaking with Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger a couple years back, so maybe they’ll have another shindig for the official kickoff?

Read all about it or take a look at the video from back in the day.

2008 saw Arnold’s first visit ever to UCSF, so Chancellor J. Michael Bishop gave him the business about it.

The stars of the show were Arnie and Mr. Eli Broad

Was that a gold fleur-de-lys ring? Something like that.

Anyway, y’all come back.

All the deets:

The building, which will be located on the Parnassus Campus, will house 25 principal investigators and their teams at full capacity. It will be the headquarters of the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCSF, which will continue to include scientists across all UCSF campuses. The relocation of scientists into the building will free up space in existing laboratories/offices that will allow for additional recruitments. UCSF has recruited 16 new faculty members to the Center in the last three years. The building will be located near UCSF Medical Center, which will support the long-term goal of translating basic research findings to clinical trials.

Groundbreaking for the building, which has more than 46,000 assignable square feet and has four split-level floors, occurred in late August 2008, with completion of the project in late-2010.”

Design-Build Team:
General Contractor
DPR Construction, Inc., San Francisco
Fabricator and Erector
Schuff Steel – Pacific Division, Oakland/San Diego, Calif. (AISC Member)
Architect
SmithGroup, San Francisco
Structural Engineer
Forell/Elsesser Engineers, Inc., San Francisco
Preliminary Design Team:
Architect
Rafael Viñoly Architects, New York
Structural Engineer
Nabih Youssef Associates, San Francisco

UCSF’s Stem Cell Center is Open – It’s the Craziest Building in Town – A 700-Foot Millipede Coming Down Mt. Sutro

Monday, November 29th, 2010

What’s the Next Big Thing in stem cell research? It’s got to be UCSF‘s shiny, brand-spanking-new, 700-foot-long Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research (CIRMbuilding from New Yawk-based Rafael Vinoly Architects.

Check it:

“The $123 million building is a series of split-level floors with terraced grass roofs and solar orientation. Open labs flow into each other, with office/interaction areas located on the circulation route between the labs, allowing for the entire research community in the building to interact.”

It’s the CIRM Worm! See?

Click to expand

It was the Modern Steel Construction Magazine cover girl earlier this year, or something, so that’s something to crow about.

As planned:

But this low-rise monster, in real life, somehow looks like:

An RV;

A boat;

A millipede; and

A Jawa Sandcrawler

And all at the same time.

Researchers have already moved in so let’s take a look why not.

Here’s the view coming up Medical Center Drive. This thing looks as if it will spring to life at any moment and start marching towards Parnassus, or Irving, to swallow a an N Judah or two:

This is how you build in Earthquake Country:

This is all the way up the hill where Med Center takes a hairpin. Kind of looks like an RV. Anterior Region in Lateral View:

Looking down the hill:

The clitellum:

And here, it sort of looks like a boat. See how it’s moored to Mount Sutro? (And hey, UCSF. Did you leave all the lights on for the entire four-day Thanksgiving weekend? O.K. fine.)

And here’s the gap betwixt floors:

Look through and you can see the ocean! (Or the bay, or the Golden Gate, or the estuary, whatever…)

Here’s the view from the roof, more or less, with a nice view of The Richmond and our Golden Gate Bridge

And here’s what we were promised, up on the roof:

And here’s what we got, it’s like weeds and International Orange chairs:

Maybe they’re still working on the vegetation.

And speaking of orange chairs, the theme continues inside:

Now, don’t fret about them concomitant radioactive materials up near the top…

…cause they have a nice outdoor shower to wash ‘em all away, Silkwood-style:

Leave us now depart the CIRM Worm:

Bon Courage, CIRM people!

They had a big party for the groundbreaking with Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger a couple years back, so maybe they’ll have another shindig for the official kickoff?

Read all about it or take a look at the video from back in the day.

2008 saw Arnold’s first visit ever to UCSF, so Chancellor J. Michael Bishop gave him the business about it.

The stars of the show were Arnie and Mr. Eli Broad

Was that a gold fleur-de-lys ring? Something like that.

Anyway, y’all come back.

All the deets:

The building, which will be located on the Parnassus Campus, will house 25 principal investigators and their teams at full capacity. It will be the headquarters of the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCSF, which will continue to include scientists across all UCSF campuses. The relocation of scientists into the building will free up space in existing laboratories/offices that will allow for additional recruitments. UCSF has recruited 16 new faculty members to the Center in the last three years. The building will be located near UCSF Medical Center, which will support the long-term goal of translating basic research findings to clinical trials.

Groundbreaking for the building, which has more than 46,000 assignable square feet and has four split-level floors, occurred in late August 2008, with completion of the project in late-2010.”

Design-Build Team:
General Contractor
DPR Construction, Inc., San Francisco
Fabricator and Erector
Schuff Steel – Pacific Division, Oakland/San Diego, Calif. (AISC Member)
Architect
SmithGroup, San Francisco
Structural Engineer
Forell/Elsesser Engineers, Inc., San Francisco
Preliminary Design Team:
Architect
Rafael Viñoly Architects, New York
Structural Engineer
Nabih Youssef Associates, San Francisco

UC Regents Approve UCSF Mission Bay Med Center – Helipad-Equipped Hospital Coming in 2014

Friday, September 17th, 2010

Oh it’s on. The fundraising campaign to get the Medical Center at Mission Bay off the ground is going well enough, so the University of California Board of Regents just gave the go-ahead for the project. The next step will be the groundbreaking ceremony. 

(And oh, what’s the LEED rating? It’s Gold, baby. And oh, we’ve got choppers - a helipad is baked into the cake. Moving on…)

Putting cancer /women’s  / children’s medicine in Mission Bay will free-up UCSF Medical Center at Parnassus Heights to do other things. It will:

“…transition into focusing on high-end adult surgical and medical services, including emergency medicine.”

(So you Inner Sunset / Cole Valley NIMBYs now have been warned. Let’s hope the increase in wailing sirens won’t disturb your lives too much…) 

Anyway, turn up your speakers waaaaay loud (you’ll soon discover why) to see this short video from UCSF Chancellor Susan Desmond-Hellmann and UCSF Medical Center CEO Mark Laret, if you want. 

And here’s the Mission Bay renderporn. Radar O’Reilly can already hear the choppers: 

 

Click to expand 

Here’s what the 183-bed UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital might look like. For the record, the naming rights went for $100,000,000: 

 

You can see it on the right here: 

 

Bon Courage, UCSF! 

All the deets: 

The University of California Board of Regents today unanimously approved funding plans for the new UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay. The board’s action is the final endorsement for the project, clearing the way for UCSF to break ground on a world-class hospital complex for children, women and cancer patients in the Mission Bay neighborhood, south of downtown San Francisco.  

“The Regents’ approval is a major milestone for UCSF and for our family of supporters throughout the community,” said UCSF Chancellor Susan Desmond-Hellmann. “It is hard to overstate the importance of the new medical center at Mission Bay, which will reinforce UCSF and the entire Bay Area as a hub of innovation, biotechnology and premier health care.”  

After nearly a decade of planning, site preparations are underway on the 14.5-acre parcel of land. Construction of the 878,000-gross-square-foot hospital complex will begin on schedule in December 2010, shortly after required state permits are expected to be issued. Upon completion in 2014, the 289-bed facility will set a new standard for patient- and family-centered health care, safety, sustainability and translational medicine.  

“Ten years ago, the UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay was a dream, but we are now ready to break ground and bring this vision to reality,” said Mark R. Laret, CEO of UCSF Medical Center and UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital. “The greatest legacy of the Regents’ decision to approve this new medical center will be the thousands of patient lives that are saved or improved because of the cutting-edge medical care that will be provided in these facilities.”  

Ever more deets, after the jump 

(more…)