Posts Tagged ‘pass’

Sneaking Into Outside Lands Used To Be Easy, But This Year It’ll Be Hard – Photos and Video of How People Have Snuck In

Thursday, August 8th, 2013

Back in the day, back in the aughts, all you had to do to get into Outside Lands was deal with just one eight-foot cyclone fence.

You had the option of going under or over the wire.

Here’s UNDER. See how that works? Easy peasy.

Click to expand – well there’s the problem: No bottom tension wire on the chain link fence plus the line posts were placed too far apart.

And here’s OVER. This here is called the bum rush:

You could get away with this kind of thing a couple years ago.

Now. things have changed – you won’t be able find these weaknesses in 2013.

Oh, your friend Badger’s working on the inside this year and he’s going to let you and your buds in? Well, that might work.

But the days of a single chain link fence between you and your tunes are over at the Outside Lands

Just saying.

Brace Yourselves, Transit Riders: “$3 Acquisition Fee for New Adult Clipper Cards Takes Effect Sept. 1, 2012″

Tuesday, August 21st, 2012

Sounds fair enough.

I had a Clipper Card once:

Turns out that it couldn’t handle a simple two-day acetone bath, you know, the better to help see what’s inside.

Actually that was the predecessor to the Clipper, the Translink. Same basic thing though. Now here’s a real Clipper in a flashlight shot to show you where the heart is, that dark square at the bottom:

I think I got it for free.

I think I gave it away.

Anyway, all the deets:

“$3 Acquisition Fee for New Adult Clipper® Cards Takes Effect Sept. 1 - Fee Will Cover Costs, Encourage Long-Term Use

OAKLAND, Calif., Aug. 20, 2012 – Beginning September 1, 2012, new Adult Clipper cards will cost $3. As an incentive for customers to try automatically reloading their Clipper cards, Clipper will waive the $3 fee for customers who sign up for the Autoload feature when they order a card online at clippercard.com.

The new $3 fee is only for new Adult Clipper cards; Youth and Senior Clipper cards remain free, and the fee for a Regional Transit Connection Clipper card, for transit riders with qualifying disabilities, remains $3.

Clipper is the reloadable card that allows Bay Area transit riders to load cash value and monthly passes over the phone, online at clippercard.com and at a variety of retail locations, including most Bay Area Walgreens stores. Clipper is accepted on San Francisco Muni, BART, Golden Gate Transit and Ferry, Caltrain, SamTrans, AC Transit, Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA), Dumbarton Express, and San Francisco Bay Ferry (currently only on the South San Francisco/East Bay route).

Clipper cards have been free since the transit card program launched in June 2010. Clipper provided the cards free of charge over the past two years as an incentive for the hundreds of thousands of Bay Area transit riders to try the card. The incentive appears to have been successful, with more than 15 million trips taken using Clipper cards in July 2012. On an average weekday, transit riders take more than 600,000 trips using the card.

“We want to encourage people to keep their cards, reload them automatically and use them for a long time, rather than throwing them out and getting new ones,” said Carol Kuester, director of the Metropolitan Transportation Commission’s Electronic Payment section. “Charging a fee for the card also helps us be better stewards of public funds.”

Clipper offers convenience by keeping track of passes, discount tickets, ride books and cash value that customers load onto it, while automatically applying all applicable fares, discounts and transfer rules. Since Clipper cards can be registered for added security, customers whose cards are lost or stolen can have their card replaced and balance restored for a fee. Clipper customers with questions about their Clipper account can log in to their accounts at clippercard.com or call Clipper Customer Service at 877-878-8883 or TDD/TYY: 711 or 800-735-2929.

Clipper is a project of the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC), the transportation planning, financing and coordinating agency for the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area.  A question-and-answer page about the $3 Clipper card acquisition fee may be found on the MTC Web site at http://www.mtc.ca.gov/news/press_releases/rel575.htm.

SOURCE  Metropolitan Transportation Commission

Metropolitan Transportation Commission”

Sneaking Into Outside Lands WON’T BE EASY This Year: Going Over or Under the Fence Gets Lots Harder

Tuesday, July 24th, 2012

Back in the day, back in the aughts, all you had to deal with was one line of eight-foot cyclone fencing in order to get into Outside Lands.

You had to go under or over.

Here’s UNDER. See how that works? Easy peasy.

Click to expand – well there’s the problem: No bottom tension wire on the chain link fence + line posts too far apart = jailbreak.

And here’s OVER. This here is called the bum rush:

You could get away with this kind of thing a couple years ago.

But things have changed recently – you won’t be able find these weaknesses in 2012.

Oh, your friend Badger’s working on the inside this year and he’s going to let you and your buds in? Well, that might work.

But the days of a single chain link fence between you and your tunes are over.

Just saying.

Speaking of Abusing Those SFPD Press Passes, What About Parking? 80% of Chinatown Spaces Used by the Working Press?

Monday, March 21st, 2011

Read all about the recent press pass revocation issue at Fog City Journal and Josh Wolf’s Freedomania.

But what about the concomitant parking passes? Remember all the way back six years to aught-five, when the press parking sitch was “out of control?” From a 2005 meeting of the SF Police Commission:

Sergeant Neville Gittens, Public Affairs, gave a presentation in regards to issuance of press passes.  In the past, there were no check and balances in terms of who gets press passes.  All an individual had to do was to show up with some type of ID or some type of letterhead that stated that he was from a news organization and that press pass was issued to that person.  When they started looking at the issue with the press passes, they realized that the situation was out of control.  The numbers were just too high.  There have been issues in terms of parking.  The press pass entitles a person to get a parking permit.  He stated that they have done enforcement in the Chinatown area and 80 percent of the parking spaces were occupied by people that displayed the Public Affairs parking permits”

Good times. Deets below.

You can see this Ford Exploder all over town, parking wherever, whenever. Is a press parking pass better than a handicap placard? Don’t know.

Click to expand

Anyway, as promised, the deets on the parking issue, and the standards for getting a press pass from 2005, below:

March 9th, 2005

“Sergeant Neville Gittens, Public Affairs, gave a presentation in regards to issuance of press passes.  In the past, there were no check and balances in terms of who gets press passes.  All an individual had to do was to show up with some type of ID or some type of letterhead that stated that he was from a news organization and that press pass was issued to that person.  When they started looking at the issue with the press passes, they realized that the situation was out of control.  The numbers were just too high.  There have been issues in terms of parking.  The press pass entitles a person to get a parking permit.  He stated that they have done enforcement in the Chinatown area and 80 percent of the parking spaces were occupied by people that displayed the Public Affairs parking permits. These problems have been ongoing and over the last two years, his unit have tightened up the criteria and have reduced the number of press passes from 1800 to just over 700.

They has also established a good relationship with the judge at Department of Parking and Traffic.  In the past, the judge have expressed issues and problems with people that have misused the parking permits continuously and at any time the judge recognizes some abuse the person is called in and a lot of times the permits were confiscated.  The goal is to get the number down to a reasonable amount where they can reissue these parking permits and press passes yearly.

Commissioner Sparks stated that this is one issue that the Commission should have a public hearing on or at least the ability for the public to respond.  She stated that she finds it distressing that the Department is trying to reduce press passes based on criteria that there is too many. She stated that the Department would be wanting to increase and to do a better job investigating who should be eligible for a press pass and issuing to qualified people and not just arbitrarily reducing the number.

Commissioner Sparks stated that the Department needs to reevaluate how the press passes are issued, what the criteria for issuing, and update the standards.  Sergeant Gittens explained that the criteria that was used is for people that are covering breaking news that required to cross police and fire lines.  He stated that that was the criteria that wasn’t followed.   Commissioner Chan what information is required from the employer in order to credential the applicant.  Sergeant Gittens stated that first they want to verify the employment.  If it’s a situation where the person is doing that, there is also the “stringers.”  The “stringers” cover the police beat, breaking news of police and fire issues.

Commissioner Orr-Smith stated that $50 seems a scant fee for such a privileged credential.  Commissioner Orr-Smith stated that when you consider that, as working press person, the cost of permits and pass are all tax deductible. She asked that the Department takes a look at raising the fee for the press credentials.  Sergeant Gittens explained that currently the press passes are free.  It’s the parking permit that cost $50. Commissioner Sparks suggests a sliding scale might be more appropriate as far as charging.  She stated that if the Department is able to charge more money, that might help to offset the costs of more detailed background investigation or more detailed evaluation of an individual applying.”

[If anybody said, "Forget it, Jake. It's Chinatown," well, it's not in the official record.]

And, lastly, the standards for getting a press pass, AFAICT:

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT

PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICE

APPLYING FOR A SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT PRESS PASS

What Is a Press Pass?

A San Francisco Police Department Press Pass is a credential that allows the media to pass through police and fire lines for the purpose of gathering news. It does not, however, entitle the holder access to a crime scene or entry into a restricted area if

such entry interferes with the duties of emergency personnel. In addition, a press pass does not necessarily guarantee the holder access to press conferences, since access is generally controlled by the sponsor of the event and not by the San Francisco Police Department.

Who Qualifies for a Press Pass?

Only persons employed by news-gathering media who are required to cover

breaking news and to pass through police and fire lines qualify for a press pass. Feature writers and photographers, editorialists, freelance writers and pbotographers, personnel of dot-com financial and business companies, financial service broadcasters, and all staff not actively gathering news at the scene of an incident are not eligible.

Completing the Application for Press Pass

When completing the Application for Press Pass, be sure to print clearly and fill in all the required information. Sign the application and be sure that the Employer’s Statement is completed. Enclose (2) l” x 1” photographs with your completed application.

Renewing Your Press Pass

You will be required to keep your Press Pass up-to-date and will not receive any

renewal notice. Prior to tbe expiration of your press pass, contact the Public Affairs Office for renewal.

Loss or Theft of Press Pass or Change of Employment

If your press pass is lost or stolen, you must file a report with the appropriate law enforcement agency and notify the San Francisco Police Department Public Affairs Office. You must also notify the Public Affairs Office upon change of employment.

850 Bryant Street, Room 549, San Francisco, CA, 94103 Tel. (415) 553-1651 / Fax (415 553-9229 E-Mail: sfpdpbaf@ix.netcom.com

What’s So Great About Having an SFPD-Issued Press Pass? It’s Value Eludes Me – What Makes It Worth $50 per Year?

Wednesday, March 9th, 2011

I’ll tell you, an SFPD press pass won’t get you into any Super Bowl, let me tell you.

If you want “media credentials,” just laminate your name and the name of your blog, bingo bango, not that I’ve done that.

You see, they’re not letting your pass into some venue, they’re letting you in. They like you, they don’t care about some card around your neck. You’ll see. And actually, these things can be a liability, sometimes.*

I suppose an official SFPD pass would make a good souvenir, something to save in your hope chest or something:

Click to expand

Fret naught, Bloggers. These things don’t really mean all that much…

*And remember that time all the Chinatown newspaper reporters got denied access to that Hillary Clinton campaign event at the Palace Hotel because, get this, they were representatives of the “foreign press” because their SFPD ID’s proved just that? Oh man, what a fustercluck that one was. Good times…

Jerry Brown Throws Down: Brokers a Deal to Have Those Altamont Pass Windmills Kill Fewer Raptor Birds

Tuesday, December 7th, 2010

Our California Attorney General Jerry Brown can’t abide thousands of California’s raptors getting chewed up by fast-spinning windmill blades, so he’s struck a deal.

Get all the deets below.

El Protector de la Gente, Jerry Brown:

via Thomas Hawk

Don’t mess with Texas, pardner. Them boids is big:

Until they fly through the Altamont Pass. Then they die:

All the deets, after the jump

(more…)

Your MUNI Clipper Card Takes an Acetone Bath – See What the Guts Look Like – Translink Card is Much Different

Monday, October 4th, 2010

I don’t know, I’d say that the Clipper Card that they’re giving away for free these days is pretty tough. I mean, it took an acetone bath for more than a day and it still held up. Of course, non-invasive techniques can only go so far.

Anyway, this is what a Clipper looks like after you peel away the layers and cut out three-quarters of the remaining plastic or acetate or whatever it is that laughs off an acetone bath: 

Click to expand

See? Copper wiring gets looped around the edges and then hooks up with the RFID-style chip that’s in there. (That’s why cutting into a Clipper with a pair of scissors will kill it tout de suite.)

But the Clipper photoed above still works though.

Now, via Tara at the Muni Diaries today, comes news of what the old-fashioned TransLink cards were like:

Via 0x0000org

See? It’s two chips, two chips in one!

Now, how will you attack your Clipper Card?

Remember, it’s “free” to get a replacement, just like how calling 311 is “free.”

Exceslior, ever upward!

What’s Inside Your Clipper Card – Mapping the Hidden RFID-Style Chip With a $3 Chinese Flashlight

Saturday, September 25th, 2010

Get up to speed on the mystery of the Clipper / TransLink buspass card right here.

Now, there’s no need for an X-ray machine, just put an LED flashlight underneath your card so you can see all its architecture tout de suite.

Here’s my setup, just to make taking a photo more easier:

Click to expand

Oh, here it is, a little rectangle with metal leads stretching out from each corner:

Now, what’s stopping you from cutting off the top three-quarters of your card to be the first kid on your block to have the tiniest of Clipper Cards? Well, there very well might be a perimeter antenna in there, that’s what. Your “contactless smart card” chip might very well be very sensitive to antenna length and alignment.

But you could probably cut out about half the plastic to leave a gaping hole in your card. It should still function.

If you wanted to.

Next step: Acetone bath. You’ll soon be free little contactless smart card chip!

P.S. MUNI sux.

P.P.S. The Central Subway sux as well. Can’t we just stop and then give the money back?

Drop Your MUNI Clipper Card into Acetone to Reveal Its RFID Chip. Then, Make a Clipper Bracelet!

Monday, September 20th, 2010

[Sofauxboho has risen to the challenge - won't you join him?]

I know what you’re thinking, you’re thinking that you want to cut up your bulky MUNI Clipper Card to make it smaller, right?

Like the way Flickrer Global X tried:

“As I am trying to limit the number of credit and payment cards I am carrying in my wallet, I decided to experiment with my San Francisco MUNI card. What would happen if I were to tape the RFID chip on the back of my Palm Pre –would I still be able to pay when I get on the bus? First, I cut the chip off the Translink card (now called Clipper). Then I taped it on the back of my Palm Pré while still allowing the back to close properly. Then I got on the bus.”

Via Global X

The problem with that is that it doesn’t work.

But here’s what you do, you get out your Clipper / Translink card and you toss it into some acetone, you dig? All the kids are doing it.*

Thusly.

Famous Akit of Akit’s Complaint Department** just learned me this.

Here’s what you get after you give your card an acetone bath. You just peel et voila:

You could put your freed RFID chip avec antenna into a fashionable bracelet and impress all your friends. Or just tape it to your mobile. (Or perhaps you could have it implanted just under your skin?)

Now I’d try this myself but I’m still boycotting the MUNI so my virginal Clipper can’t be used for testing.  But you, you be my guest.

Try it!

*All the kids are _not_ doing this. Use caution. 

** “It’s a fantastic blog for any San Franciscan.” (Kevin)

“Your blog is always on point, and well researched!” (Nina Decker)

“Everyone’s favorite volunteer public policy consultant…” (Eve Batey, SF Appeal)

“You are doing a great job keeping on top of Translink stuff. Keep up the good work!” (Greg Dewar)

“Thank you for taking the time and making the effort that our elected and highly paid officials can’t or won’t.” (Anonymous)

“…I don’t even bother subscribing anywhere else for my local public transportation info. You have it all…” (Empowered Follower)

** Follow Akit on Twitter! **

When is the Steam Pipe Underneath McAllister and Larkin NOT Steaming?

Wednesday, March 3rd, 2010

Via ActionNewsSF, you might search to find a KGO-TV bit covering the traffic-disrupting venting steam pipe at McAllister and Larkin today – it’s more steam than usual, that’s for sure.

But this area of Civic Center right in front of our Asian Art Museum (this year, it’s Shanghai) is basically steaming all the time, right?

HC SVNT DRACONES:

Click to expand.

This intersection is usually steaming, unless it’s flooding. Like this:

via Lulu Vision

Oh well.

As per usual, it all happens on (or near) McAllister Street, Gateway to the Golden Gate Park Panhandle and home of the Snickerdoodle bike path (Route 20), your best way of getting over Alamo Heights while avoiding the abysmal, Hayes Valley NIMBY-designed Octavia Boulevard 24-7 traffic scrum.