Posts Tagged ‘passes’

Uh Oh: Many Many Outside Lands 2014 Tickets from Scalpers are Turning Out to be Fake – Here’s What They Look Like

Friday, August 8th, 2014

Like all these tickets are fake, per the SFPD:

Click to expand

So if you try to use your fake ticket at the box office it won’t work, sorry.

Here’s a close-up from from Cornell Banard:

How can you tell a fake from a real ticket? I don’t think you can.

Many many fakes are out there:

@KimKardashian I got sold a fake ticket to outside lands fest to see Kanye!! Can you help me????

What White People Don’t Like:

Waiting around by boxoffice watching all manner of teary-eyed white 20-somethings stomp away screaming on phones abt fake tix

What can be done?

Don’t buy tickets from scalpers. Judging by the amount of tears at the entry gate, they are almost all fake. Duh.

So, choose wisely.

(You can always try to go over or under The Wire, but that kind of thing probably won’t work.)

Sneaking Into Outside Lands 2014: It Can Be Done, But It’s Hard – Remembering the Old Days, When It Was Easy

Friday, August 8th, 2014

[UPDATE: You can always try your luck with the scalpers but there’s a huge wave of pretty good looking fakes out there this year, sorry. Oh, and here’s a sampling of the citations the SFPD has issued to people getting caught trying to sneak in on this first day of the 2014 event:

Ouch!]

Back in the day, back in the aughts, all you had to do to sneak into Outside Lands was deal with just one eight-foot cyclone fence.

You had the option of going under the wire or over the wire.

Here’s under. See how that worked? Easy peasy.

Well there’s the problem: No bottom tension wire on the chain link fence plus the line posts were placed too far apart:

Click to expand

And here’s an example of over. This is called the bum rush:

You could get away with this kind of thing a few years ago.

But nowadays, things have changed. You won’t be able find these weaknesses in 2014.

Oh, your friend Badger’s working on the inside this year and he’s going to let you and your buds in?

Well, that might work.

But the days of a single chain link fence between you and your tunes are over at the Outside Lands

Just saying, once again.

Sneaking Into Outside Lands Used To Be Easy, But This Year It’ll Be Hard – Photos and Video of How People Have Snuck In

Thursday, August 8th, 2013

Back in the day, back in the aughts, all you had to do to get into Outside Lands was deal with just one eight-foot cyclone fence.

You had the option of going under or over the wire.

Here’s UNDER. See how that works? Easy peasy.

Click to expand – well there’s the problem: No bottom tension wire on the chain link fence plus the line posts were placed too far apart.

And here’s OVER. This here is called the bum rush:

You could get away with this kind of thing a couple years ago.

Now. things have changed – you won’t be able find these weaknesses in 2013.

Oh, your friend Badger’s working on the inside this year and he’s going to let you and your buds in? Well, that might work.

But the days of a single chain link fence between you and your tunes are over at the Outside Lands

Just saying.

Here’s Why MUNI Basing Its Fares on Your Income Will Never Be “Cost Neutral” – Expansionist SFMTA – Through With the Two-Step

Monday, December 3rd, 2012

Here’s the news:

“Reiskin said he’d like to develop a fare system that cuts down on the red tape and provides discounts for those who need them, and full-fare rates for those who don’t. Reiskin said the program ideally would be cost-neutral, with prosperous older riders paying increased fares and lower-income adults paying less.”

Now of course MUNI wants more money money money all the time time time.

So of course, you could concoct a scheme that would be cost-neutral, at first, anyway.

But that wouldn’t be the point of the exercise.

The point of the exercise would be to raise revenue for MUNI by subsequently raising fares for the average rider.

So, step one is to change the fare structure to make step two viable.

Step two is to raise fares.

I see what you’re doing there, MUNI.

Well, myself, I’m through with the two-step.

Yet another car on Market Street* delaying MUNI:

Click to expand

*The only way the driver of the white wagon could have been at fault in this collision was if she had raced passed the orange streetcar by illegally driving the wrong way on the wrong side of Market. 

 

Sneaking Into Outside Lands WON’T BE EASY This Year: Going Over or Under the Fence Gets Lots Harder

Tuesday, July 24th, 2012

Back in the day, back in the aughts, all you had to deal with was one line of eight-foot cyclone fencing in order to get into Outside Lands.

You had to go under or over.

Here’s UNDER. See how that works? Easy peasy.

Click to expand – well there’s the problem: No bottom tension wire on the chain link fence + line posts too far apart = jailbreak.

And here’s OVER. This here is called the bum rush:

You could get away with this kind of thing a couple years ago.

But things have changed recently – you won’t be able find these weaknesses in 2012.

Oh, your friend Badger’s working on the inside this year and he’s going to let you and your buds in? Well, that might work.

But the days of a single chain link fence between you and your tunes are over.

Just saying.

Speaking of Abusing Those SFPD Press Passes, What About Parking? 80% of Chinatown Spaces Used by the Working Press?

Monday, March 21st, 2011

Read all about the recent press pass revocation issue at Fog City Journal and Josh Wolf’s Freedomania.

But what about the concomitant parking passes? Remember all the way back six years to aught-five, when the press parking sitch was “out of control?” From a 2005 meeting of the SF Police Commission:

Sergeant Neville Gittens, Public Affairs, gave a presentation in regards to issuance of press passes.  In the past, there were no check and balances in terms of who gets press passes.  All an individual had to do was to show up with some type of ID or some type of letterhead that stated that he was from a news organization and that press pass was issued to that person.  When they started looking at the issue with the press passes, they realized that the situation was out of control.  The numbers were just too high.  There have been issues in terms of parking.  The press pass entitles a person to get a parking permit.  He stated that they have done enforcement in the Chinatown area and 80 percent of the parking spaces were occupied by people that displayed the Public Affairs parking permits”

Good times. Deets below.

You can see this Ford Exploder all over town, parking wherever, whenever. Is a press parking pass better than a handicap placard? Don’t know.

Click to expand

Anyway, as promised, the deets on the parking issue, and the standards for getting a press pass from 2005, below:

March 9th, 2005

“Sergeant Neville Gittens, Public Affairs, gave a presentation in regards to issuance of press passes.  In the past, there were no check and balances in terms of who gets press passes.  All an individual had to do was to show up with some type of ID or some type of letterhead that stated that he was from a news organization and that press pass was issued to that person.  When they started looking at the issue with the press passes, they realized that the situation was out of control.  The numbers were just too high.  There have been issues in terms of parking.  The press pass entitles a person to get a parking permit.  He stated that they have done enforcement in the Chinatown area and 80 percent of the parking spaces were occupied by people that displayed the Public Affairs parking permits. These problems have been ongoing and over the last two years, his unit have tightened up the criteria and have reduced the number of press passes from 1800 to just over 700.

They has also established a good relationship with the judge at Department of Parking and Traffic.  In the past, the judge have expressed issues and problems with people that have misused the parking permits continuously and at any time the judge recognizes some abuse the person is called in and a lot of times the permits were confiscated.  The goal is to get the number down to a reasonable amount where they can reissue these parking permits and press passes yearly.

Commissioner Sparks stated that this is one issue that the Commission should have a public hearing on or at least the ability for the public to respond.  She stated that she finds it distressing that the Department is trying to reduce press passes based on criteria that there is too many. She stated that the Department would be wanting to increase and to do a better job investigating who should be eligible for a press pass and issuing to qualified people and not just arbitrarily reducing the number.

Commissioner Sparks stated that the Department needs to reevaluate how the press passes are issued, what the criteria for issuing, and update the standards.  Sergeant Gittens explained that the criteria that was used is for people that are covering breaking news that required to cross police and fire lines.  He stated that that was the criteria that wasn’t followed.   Commissioner Chan what information is required from the employer in order to credential the applicant.  Sergeant Gittens stated that first they want to verify the employment.  If it’s a situation where the person is doing that, there is also the “stringers.”  The “stringers” cover the police beat, breaking news of police and fire issues.

Commissioner Orr-Smith stated that $50 seems a scant fee for such a privileged credential.  Commissioner Orr-Smith stated that when you consider that, as working press person, the cost of permits and pass are all tax deductible. She asked that the Department takes a look at raising the fee for the press credentials.  Sergeant Gittens explained that currently the press passes are free.  It’s the parking permit that cost $50. Commissioner Sparks suggests a sliding scale might be more appropriate as far as charging.  She stated that if the Department is able to charge more money, that might help to offset the costs of more detailed background investigation or more detailed evaluation of an individual applying.”

[If anybody said, "Forget it, Jake. It's Chinatown," well, it's not in the official record.]

And, lastly, the standards for getting a press pass, AFAICT:

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT

PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICE

APPLYING FOR A SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT PRESS PASS

What Is a Press Pass?

A San Francisco Police Department Press Pass is a credential that allows the media to pass through police and fire lines for the purpose of gathering news. It does not, however, entitle the holder access to a crime scene or entry into a restricted area if

such entry interferes with the duties of emergency personnel. In addition, a press pass does not necessarily guarantee the holder access to press conferences, since access is generally controlled by the sponsor of the event and not by the San Francisco Police Department.

Who Qualifies for a Press Pass?

Only persons employed by news-gathering media who are required to cover

breaking news and to pass through police and fire lines qualify for a press pass. Feature writers and photographers, editorialists, freelance writers and pbotographers, personnel of dot-com financial and business companies, financial service broadcasters, and all staff not actively gathering news at the scene of an incident are not eligible.

Completing the Application for Press Pass

When completing the Application for Press Pass, be sure to print clearly and fill in all the required information. Sign the application and be sure that the Employer’s Statement is completed. Enclose (2) l” x 1” photographs with your completed application.

Renewing Your Press Pass

You will be required to keep your Press Pass up-to-date and will not receive any

renewal notice. Prior to tbe expiration of your press pass, contact the Public Affairs Office for renewal.

Loss or Theft of Press Pass or Change of Employment

If your press pass is lost or stolen, you must file a report with the appropriate law enforcement agency and notify the San Francisco Police Department Public Affairs Office. You must also notify the Public Affairs Office upon change of employment.

850 Bryant Street, Room 549, San Francisco, CA, 94103 Tel. (415) 553-1651 / Fax (415 553-9229 E-Mail: sfpdpbaf@ix.netcom.com