Posts Tagged ‘patient’

Hospital Rooms at the Forthcoming “UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay” are Oprah-Approved, More or Less

Friday, November 18th, 2011

The Future is coming to Mission Bay and this is what it will look like. Get all the deets below.

Hurray!

  • Private room. Nearly all patient rooms will be private, with the exception of intensive care nurseries designed for multiple births.
  • Spacious bathroom with double doors. Every UCSF patient room will have its own large bathroom with a wide entry door.
  • Adaptable head wall. Patient rooms will include an optimized boom mount on the ceiling that will increase room flexibility and open up more floor space.
  • Hand-sanitizer pump. Hand-washing sinks will be located upon the entrance to each room.
  • Sound-absorbing ceiling tiles. The accessible ceiling tiles in each room are designed to absorb sound and can be cleaned easily.
  • Soothing music. Patients will be able to personalize their music selections; music will not be piped in.
  • A view of nature. Rooms will offer a range of views, from gardens to the San Francisco Bay to the ballpark.
  • Light-filled window. Every room will include a huge window.
  • Carpeting. Rubber floors will promote infection control, reduce noise and offer increased comfort for patients and staff.

(Source: Mary Phillips, project manager for interior design for Mission Bay Hospitals Project)

Click to expand

“Patient rooms in the UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay, including this acute care patient room at the future women’s specialty hospital, are designed to maximize comfort, efficiency and safety.

The new UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay is planned as a shining example of evidence-based hospital design, an increasingly prevalent trend built on research suggesting that design can improve health outcomes by increasing safety and reducing stress among patients, their families and hospital staff.

Evidence-based design concepts recently reached a huge new audience when O, The Oprah Magazine ran an article in its September issue highlighting the “Fable Hospital 2.0,” a conceptual patient room designed by a team of researchers, architects and health care experts as an ideal facility.

Features of UCSF’s 289-bed Mission Bay hospital complex — including private rooms and bathrooms for nearly all patients; individualized lighting, temperature and music controls; and large windows offering views of serene outdoor spaces — match up almost exactly with those of the Fable Hospital. The most notable exception is UCSF’s decision not to use carpeting in patient rooms, a feature of the Fable room that was deemed an infection risk. Instead, UCSF’s floors will be made of rubber, which absorbs noise and can be cleaned using fewer chemicals than vinyl flooring.

Such decisions about the new women’s, children’s and cancer hospitals slated to open in early 2015 are the result of an extensive, highly collaborative process that engaged leading architects teams of university staff and caregivers, and patients and their families.

“Overall, the facilities will be spectacular, contemporary, appealing and sophisticated,” said Cindy Lima, executive director of the Mission Bay Hospitals Project. “Patients, families and staff alike will benefit from a beautiful and soothing environment that I hope will feel more like a sun-drenched retreat than a hospital.”

Lima was quick to point out that “while stunning, the design is simple and the buildings are highly efficient.”

“We didn’t want people to end up feeling we’d been lavish and irresponsible with resources,” echoed Dr. Elena Gates, chief of the UCSF Division of General Gynecology, who has been involved in the planning process since the beginning. “It’s amazing what one can do while also being quite reasonable.”

More deets after the jump

(more…)

ZOMG, the First Annual UCSF Patient Prom is Coming to UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital April 15th!

Friday, March 25th, 2011

Our world-class, UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital is having a patient prom, the first annual!

Get all the deets right here from Juliana Bunim.

UCSF patient and soon-to-be prom-goer Rachel Hale with boyfriend Cameron:

Via Photographer Cindy Chew (Hey institutions, it looks like you can hire famous local photographer Cindy Chew to do shoots these days – does she have a website with contact info? [UPDATE: Sadly no. But email me and I can pass along your contact info, She's great, srsly.] Click to expand

Have a great 2011 Prom, everybody!


As H1N1 Fears Subside, UCSF Hospitals are Once Again Open to Visiting Children

Wednesday, March 10th, 2010

Those kids crowding Moffitt Cafe at UCSF Medical Center / Children’s Hospital will now have Run of the House, more or less, ’cause the restrictions against child visitors just got eliminated. So, as of yesterday, the place is, once again, totally wide open, more or less, to visitors aged 15 and less. 

Not sure what other local hospitals are thinking these days, but UCSF says that Influenza activity has decreased considerably lately. Read all about it, below.

Godzilla menaces this huge architect’s model of UCSF under a glass box, so he’s always safe from H1N1. But runaway tow trucks, well, that’s a different story:

Moffitt Cafe is now released from its ragamuffin daycare role so it can return to being a haven for law students, a place of escape where legal scholars are free to hit on medical and pharmacological students and/or professionals in a target-rich environment. (At least that’s how the cafeteria was used back in the 90′s.)

Forthwith, the News of the Day:

UCSF Lifts Hospital Visitor Policy Restricting Children

March 09, 2010

UCSF Medical Center and UCSF Children’s Hospital are lifting their visitor age restriction, which prohibited visitors younger than 16 years old. The visitor policy is being lifted effective March 9, 2010.

Dr. Joshua Adler, chief medical officer at UCSF, said he believes the policy, implemented in November, and other strategies, such as vaccination of UCSF personnel, helped reduce the risk of hospital-acquired influenza.

Influenza activity has decreased considerably so that risk is now quite low, Adler said. In the hospital units where age restrictions are not usually in place, children now may visit. Unit-specific age restrictions, such as those in the intensive care units, may remain in effect, according to unit-based policy.

A requirement, however, remains in effect until March 31 that health care workers, who have not been vaccinated against both H1N1 and seasonal influenza, must wear a surgical mask while in patient care areas.

Adler thanked employees for their diligent infection control measures during the flu season. Record numbers of UCSF employees, faculty, residents, and students received flu vaccines this year, he said.

The Loyal Hungarian Vizsla Dogs of San Francisco’s Inner Sunset

Monday, July 13th, 2009

Can you guess which way the owner of this Audi A4 (chariot of the Yuppie) convertible headed out after parking on 9th Avenue?

I can. How about the Yelp-rated Inner Sunset Farmer’s Market just across the street avenue – that must have been where the Master Guardian headed.

Click to expand:

IMG_6253 copy

So patient, so loyal these ginger pups are.

[UPDATE: Apparently they’re not Irish Setters, they’re Hungarian Vizslas. The More You Know….]

UCSF Children’s Hospital Presents “Tomorrow….A Better Day” at the de Young

Monday, May 4th, 2009

San Francisco just saw quite a production – Tomorrow….A Better Day from the UCSF Children’s Hospital at UCSF Medical Center. Teens from The Northwest School came down from Seattle, Washington to do a performance piece based on teens’ experiences with chronic illness and hospitalization.

It was easy to tell the players put a lot of work into it. Here’s a scene from Friday at the de Young Museum‘s Koret Auditorium:

The UCSF Children’s Hospital is something of a hotbed of theatrical productions – take a look here to see other projects the kids are working on. Look for news of future events that you can witness here, on Yelp.

This seems like a great program. Here are the details:

 

Play to explore experiences of chronically ill and hospitalized teens

WHAT:

UCSF Children’s Hospital will present “Tomorrow… A Better Day,” a performance piece based on teens’ experiences with chronic illness and hospitalization. The play is a compilation of writings by current and former teen patients at UCSF, adapted for the stage by teachers and students at the arts-focused Northwest School in Seattle. Healthy teens from the Northwest School will travel to San Francisco to perform the piece, which captures the many facets of how teens experience healthcare, and shows how creativity and artistic expression marshal the healing process.

WHEN:

Thursday, April 30, at 12:15 PM, and Friday, May 1, at 3 PM
A question/answer session will immediately follow each performance.

WHERE:

April 30 performance – Cole Hall, UCSF, 513 Parnassus Ave., San Francisco
May 1 performance – The de Young Museum, Koret Auditorium,
50 Hagiwara Tea Garden Dr., Golden Gate Park, San Francisco

WHO:

Performers, UCSF Child Life Specialists, UCSF teen patients and their families, UCSF Children’s Hospital leadership

CONTACT:

If you plan to attend either performance, please RSVP to Kate Schoen at (415) 476-2557 or kschoen@pubaff.ucsf.edu. On the day of each event, contact Kate Schoen on mobile phone (415) 672-6875.

BACKGROUND INFORMATION:

“Tomorrow…A Better Day” was created with support from the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. The idea for the project stemmed from the UCSF Children’s Hospital Child Life Department, whose staff wanted to broaden programming and support for the teen patient population. In 2007, the department began offering a weekend creative arts program for teenagers, many of whom were confined to their hospital beds.

One of the nation’s top children’s hospitals, UCSF Children’s Hospital creates an environment where children and their families find compassionate care at the healing edge of scientific discovery, with more than 150 experts in 50 medical specialties serving patients throughout Northern California and beyond. The hospital admits about 5,000 children each year, including 2,000 babies born in the hospital.