Posts Tagged ‘ph.d’

It’s Food Day: Watch “Food Deserts: Legal, Social, and Public Health Challenges” Live from UC Hastings at 1:00 PM

Monday, October 24th, 2011

OMG, it’s Food Day 2011, so check the link to see what’s going on about the Bay Area today.

Here’s the manifesto:

At UC Hastings in Civic Center, the UCSF / UC Hastings Consortium on Law, Science & Health Policy will put on Food Deserts: Legal, Social, and Public Health Challenges starting at 1:00 PM.

Watch it on the livestream, why not? Or see about heading over to this free event yourself.

All the deets:

“Food Deserts: Legal, Social, and Public Health Challenges

Start: 10/24/2011 from 1:00 PM to 7:00 PM
Location: 200 McAllister, Alumni Reception Center

The UCSF / UC Hastings Consortium on Law, Science & Health Policy is sponsoring a conference entitled “Food Deserts: Legal, Social, and Public Health Challenges” on Food Day, October 24, 2011.
The conference will bring together scholars from the health sciences and the law, as well as policymakers, activists, and food industry members, to discuss two important aspects of “food deserts,” places where access to a nutritionally-adequate diet is severely restricted.

One panel, Nourishing Our Neighborhoods: Insights from Law, Planning, and Industry, will cover the broad issue of geographical food deserts, usually urban areas inhabited by mostly-poor people whose transportation and finances are limited, where food sellers are predominantly small stores that cannot stock a wide variety of fresh food items, and where full-service grocery stores hesitate to locate. Are there policies (such as those in zoning rules) that could be changed to enable oases in these food deserts? What impact does, for example, the addition of a full-service grocery store have on the health of the neighboring area?

Another panel, Food and Nutrition in Correctional Institutions, will consider issues relevant to prisons and jails. While food offerings must meet certain basic caloric and nutritional requirements, the institutional nature of food preparation and food service might make that food less than appealing, and the healthier elements of meals might well be those not regularly or fully consumed. The supplemental food offerings – those for sale in these institutions – are not likely to be nutritious. Some research suggests that improved nutrition in prisons leads to improved penal outcomes. If that is so, what policy changes should be implemented? Would such changes be cost-beneficial, considering penal outcomes and the government’s responsibility for health care of prisoners?

At 5 pm, Dr. David Kessler, former Commissioner of the United States Food and Drug Administration and Professor of Pediatrics and Epidemiology and Biostatistics, UCSF, will give the keynote address on The End of Overeating. This conference will be free and open to the public.”

Ever more deets after the jump

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Senator Leland Yee Throws Down: Declares Himself a Candidate to Media Scrum – Time for SF’s First Asian-Am. Mayor?

Wednesday, November 10th, 2010

Here’s the scene this morning just after Senator Leland Yee signed some papers to indicate that he’d be willing serve as Mayor of San Francisco:

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It was pandemonium inside Room 48 today:

All right, who’s next?

Wednesday, November 10, 2010

Leland Yee Announces Exploratory Committee for Mayor

SAN FRANCISCO – Today, State Senator Leland Yee (D-San Francisco) pulled papers to officially explore a run for mayor of San Francisco.

“I am honored by the support and encouragement I have received from my family and the residents of San Francisco to consider a run for mayor,” said Yee.  “Today, we begin the process of asking San Franciscans what they want of their city government and their next mayor.”

“As someone who grew up in San Francisco, attended public schools, raised a family, and has been serving this city for over 20 years, I am excited about starting this new discussion,” said Yee.  “I look forward to talking with voters from throughout the city about my record of getting things done and fighting for kids, working families, and greater government transparency.”

“We need experienced leadership that can bring us together as one community,” said Yee.  “I want to see the Mayor work with, and not against the Board of Supervisors. The next mayor should partner with the school board, parents and teachers to improve our public schools.  It is time we get back to basics, fix Muni, create jobs and continue to lead on important issues like the environment and human rights.”

For the past eight years, Yee has served San Francisco in the State Assembly and State Senate, where he has one of the best legislative track records.  Among the 100 laws he has authored, Yee has brought greater transparency and accountability to government and has focused on issues surrounding children and schools, working families, the environment, mental health, domestic violence, civil rights, and consumers.  He has also opposed all budget cuts to education and critical health and social services.

Prior to the State Legislature, Yee served on the San Francisco Board of Supervisors where he created the largest rainy-day fund in the city’s history and passed the best government transparency and public access ordinance in the country.  As a member of the San Francisco Board of Education, Yee reduced class sizes, increased access to school services, streamlined bureaucracy, and brought higher curriculum standards.

Yee immigrated to San Francisco at the age of 3.  His father, a veteran, served in the US Army and the Merchant Marine. Yee is a graduate of the University of California – Berkeley, San Francisco State University, and City College of San Francisco, and holds a Ph.D. in Child Psychology.  He and his wife, Maxine, have raised four children who all attended San Francisco public schools.

UCSF Medical Center Ranked, Once Again, as a Top Ten Hospital by U.S. News & World Report

Thursday, July 15th, 2010

Here’s the latest from the Hospital on the Hill, UCSF Medical Center. Per U.S. Snooze and World Distort, here’s how America’s hospitals stack up as of 2010-2011:

1.Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore
2.Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.
3.Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
4.Cleveland Clinic
5.Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles
6.New York-Presbyterian University Hospital of Columbia and Cornell
7.UCSF Medical Center, San Francisco
8.Barnes-Jewish Hospital/Washington University, St. Louis, Mo.
9.Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
10.Duke University Medical Center, Durham, N.C.
11.Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston
12.University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle
13.UPMC-University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
14.University of Michigan Hospitals and Health Centers, Ann Arbor

That’s not half bad, huh? Over the past century, UCSF has gotten better and better and our transit system has gotten worse and worse, it would appear. That’s not a bad trade-off.

Back in the day, it’s the ur-N Judah passing by UCSF:

Oh well.

Congratulations, people of UCSF!

All the deets:

UCSF Medical Center Named a Top 10 Hospital for 10th Consecutive Year

July 15, 2010
News Office: Karin Rush-Monroe

UCSF Medical Center ranks among the nation’s top 10 premier hospitals for the 10th consecutive year and is the best in Northern California, according to the 2010-11 America’s Best Hospitals survey conducted by U.S. News & World Report.

UCSF was named the seventh best hospital in the country, earning a spot on the survey’s “honor roll.” Of the 4,852 medical centers evaluated by U.S. News this year, only 14 earned honor roll status, demonstrating excellence and breadth of expertise by ranking at or near the top in at least six specialties.

The U.S. News score summarizes overall quality of inpatient care including balance of nurses to patients, mortality, patient safety, reputation, procedure volume, and care-related measures such as technology and patient services.

Mark R. Laret, CEO of UCSF Medical Center, said, “It is gratifying that the breadth of our expertise — from cancer to neurosurgery, from ophthalmology to gynecology — is ranked among the very best in the nation. I want to commend all the UCSF clinicians, faculty and staff, in addition to our physician partners in the community, who continually strive to improve the delivery of our care.”

Ever more deets, after the jump

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Senator Leland Yee Wants Same-Day Registration for California Voters

Friday, January 29th, 2010

Our Senator Leland Yee, Ph.D. doesn’t want you to be required to register a way ahead of election day. So, he’ll soon have a bill that would let you be able to go to the polls, register tout de suite and then vote. Easy peasy, right?

Dr. Yee plans to officially introduce the bill in the next two weeks, with the first hearing likely in March.

Senator Yee speaking this morning at San Francisco’s State Building, with San Mateo County Elections Manager David Tom, San Mateo County Supervisor Rich Gordon, and San Mateo County Chief Elections Officer / Assessor-County Clerk-Recorder Warren Slocum:

All the deets, after the jump.
 

Another Nobel Prize for UC San Francisco – Dr. Elizabeth Blackburn Brings Home the Gold

Monday, October 5th, 2009

Here she is, America’s newest Nobel Prize winner: UCSF‘s Elizabeth H. Blackburn, Ph.D:

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They’ll be partying hard today down at the Mission Bay campus. The celebration in Genentech Hall starts in just a few minutes and they’ll have a full-blown news conference this afternoon.

Wow! First Oprah and now this.  

Of course Elizabeth wouldn’t want to leave out her co-winners, so let’s give a shout out to Carol W. Greider of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Jack W. Szostak of Harvard Medical School.

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It’s going to be on!

Congratulations to Elizabeth and everybody at the University of California, San Francisco

Fiat Lux, baby!

THE DISCOVERY OF THE TELOMERASE ENZYME

The scientists discovered an enzyme that plays a key role in normal cell function, as well as in cell aging and most cancers.  The enzyme is called telomerase and it produces tiny units of DNA that seal off the ends of chromosomes, which contain the body’s genes. These DNA units – named telomeres—protect the integrity of the genes and maintain chromosomal stability and accurate cell division.  They also determine the number of times a cell divides—and thus determine the lifespan of cells.

Telomerase is pronounced (tel-AH-mer-AZE). Telomere is pronounced (TEEL-oh-mere).

The research sparked a whole field of inquiry into the possibility that telomerase could be activated to treat such age-related diseases as blindness, cardiovascular disease and neurodegenerative diseases, and deactivated to treat cancer, in which the enzyme generally is overactive.

In recent years, Blackburn and colleagues have explored the possibility that life stress, the perception of life stress and lifestyle behaviors could take a toll on telomerase and telomeres. They have reported several studies with human participants, suggesting a correlation. The findings may offer insight, at the cellular level, into the impact of stress on early onset of age-related diseases.

The scientists were named to receive the prize “for the discovery of how chromosomes are protected by telomeres and the telomerase enzyme,” according to the Nobel committee in Stockholm, Sweden.

Evolution of discovery

Blackburn’s road to discovery traces back to 1975 to 1977, when she was a postdoctoral fellow at Yale University. There, working with Joseph Gall, she discovered the unusual nature of telomeres, with their simple, repeated DNA sequences comprising chromosome ends. The work was published in 1978.

With Szostak, she established that these DNA repeats stabilize chromosomes inside cells. They also predicted the existence of an enzyme that would add the sequences to the ends of chromosomes.

In 1985, while a professor at University of California, Berkeley, Blackburn and her then-graduate student Greider reported the discovery of such an enzyme, which they named telomerase. Their research showed that in some organisms, such as the single-celled pond dweller Tetrahymena, telomerase continuously replenishes the chromosome’s telomeric tips. In humans, however, researchers, including Blackburn and her group, showed that telomerase is damped down at certain times in the lives of many types of cells, limiting their ability to self-replenish.

With this discovery, scientists saw the possibility of exploring whether, in humans, the enzyme could be reactivated to prolong cell life to treat age-related diseases, and deactivated to interrupt cancers.

Blackburn joined the UCSF faculty in 1990 and is the Morris Herzstein Endowed Chair in Biology and Physiology in the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.

She is the fourth UCSF scientist to win the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.
A native of Australia, Blackburn has lived in the United States since 1975, and is a naturalized citizen of the United States as of September 2003.

She lives in San Francisco with her husband, John Sedat, PhD, a professor of biochemistry and biophysics at UCSF. They have one son, Benjamin.

UCSF is a leading university dedicated to promoting health worldwide through advanced biomedical research, graduate-level education in the life sciences and health professions, and excellence in patient care.

The California Academy of Sciences Announces Extended Summer Hours

Wednesday, July 29th, 2009

Our CalAcademy has just announced extended hours!

So, until September 3, 2009, the California Academy of Sciences in Golden Gate Park will be open until 8:00 PM on Mondays and Tuesdays. Check all the deets below.

Are the animules friendlier during the evening? It sure seems that way:

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THE CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES ANNOUNCES EXTENDED SUMMER HOURS FROM AUGUST 3-SEPTEMBER 8, 2009

Museum to stay open until 8:00 pm every Monday and Tuesday night.

Summer nights in San Francisco just got steamier. Visitors to the California Academy of Sciences can now enjoy the four-story rainforest exhibit, the swampy alligator habitat, the mangrove lagoon, and the rest of the museum’s exhibits and shows until 8:00 pm every Monday and Tuesday from August 3 through September 8, 2009.

San Francisco residents and tourists alike can take advantage of the long summer days to visit the Academy during off-peak times for Golden Gate Park—and to catch some of the aquarium’s nocturnal animals at their most active. “We have been delighted by the strong interest that San Francisco residents and visitors have shown in the new Academy since we opened last September,” said Dr. Greg Farrington, executive director of the Academy. “These extended summer hours will help ensure that everyone who wants to visit with our penguins and zoom through our digital Universe is able to do so.”

Dr. F welcomes you:

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“Throughout the extended summer hours program, all of the Academy’s exhibits will remain open until 8:00 pm on Monday and Tuesday nights, and the planetarium and 3D theater will offer additional shows. The Academy Cafe will also remain open, giving working parents the opportunity to bring their kids to the Academy for “dinner and a museum” as a special weeknight treat.

Regular admission fees will apply for the Academy’s extended summer hours; Academy members will be admitted free of charge. Unlike the Academy’s weekly Thursday night program, NightLife, during which adults ages 21 and over can enjoy the museum from 6:00 – 10:00 pm, the Academy’s extended summer hours on Monday and Tuesday nights will be available for all ages. Tickets can be purchased at the door or in advance online at www.calacademy.org/tickets. As always, visitors who take public transportation receive a $3 discount.

On Monday, August 3, evening visitors can also choose to attend an astronomy lecture by Margaret Race from the SETI Institute. Hosted inside the Academy’s 90-foot diameter planetarium dome, the lecture will begin at 7:30 pm. During the talk, Race will describe how experts from many different disciplines contribute to searches for extraterrestrial life—and explain how the Outer Space Treaty and planetary protection policies urge “responsible exploration” when visiting other planets. Lecture tickets cost $10, and advanced purchase is recommended. Tickets can be purchased online or by calling 800-794-7576.

 The California Academy of Sciences is home to Steinhart Aquarium, Morrison Planetarium, Kimball Natural History Museum, and world-class research and education programs—all under one living roof. The new Academy, designed by award-winning architect Renzo Piano, opened to the public on September 27. Admission to the Academy is: $24.95 for adults; $19.95 for youth ages 12 to 17, Seniors ages 65+ and students with valid ID; $14.95 for children ages seven to 11; and free for children ages six and younger. The Academy is free to the public on the third Wednesday of each month. Admission fees include all exhibits and shows. Hours are 9:30 am – 5:00 pm Monday – Saturday, and 11:00 am – 5:00 pm on Sunday. The Academy is closed on Thanksgiving and Christmas. www.calacademy.org. (415) 379-8000.