Posts Tagged ‘Phantoms of Asia’

Your Asian Art Museum: Free “Phantoms” This Sunday! Korean Culture Day Sept 23! Origami Graffiti!

Friday, August 31st, 2012

OMG, your world-class Asian Art Museum is busy busy busy these days.

First up is the origami paper-crane pop-up graffiti bombing of the McAllister wall.

Get all the deets from the Uptown Almanac, the San Francisco Chronicle and KGO-ABC.

Here’s how it’s holding up, last night…

…and the day before:

It’s persevering, huh?

Next up is the closing of the Big Show, check it:

Phantoms of Asia: Contemporary Awakens the Past

CLOSING THIS SUNDAY

Just as this exhibition has touched upon the fleeting nature of life, it too must come to an end. An expansive exploration of spirituality, cosmic order, and the afterlife, it’s a provocative presentation of both contemporary art and older objects from our collection. The result is a one-of-a-kind journey transcending time and place. Phantoms will go out with a bang: everyone can see it for FREE this Sunday, as part of our Target First Free Sunday.”

I’d recommend showing up early or late on Sept 2, 2012.  Feel free to practice your Gangnam Style while waiting in line. Speaking of which, don’t forget about:

Korean Culture Day 2012

Sunday, September 23
11 am–4 pm
Museum-wide 

Free admission”

All the deets on that after the jump.

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OMG, the Giant “Kinetic Red Lotus” Just Arrived at Civic Center – “Phantoms of Asia” Will Open Soon at Our Asian Art Museum

Saturday, May 12th, 2012

The Asian Art Museum Blog has the news about the big new piece that’s just been installed in Civic Center. It’s all a part of Phantoms of Asia: Contemporary Awakens the Past, which starts May 18th, 2012 at the Asian Art Museum.

Here’s the video of them installing it yesterday afternoon:

And here’s what it looked like yesterday evening:

Click to expand

The HuffPo has the story:

“Timed to coincide with the Asian Art Museum‘s Phantoms of Asia exhibition, Civic Center Plaza will soon play host to Korean artist Choi Jeon Hwa’s Breathing Flower sculpture–a 24-foot tall, bright red recreation of a lotus flower with motorized petals set up to open and close throughout the course of the day.

curatorial statement from the Asian Art Museum details some of the meaning behind the work:

“Looking closely at this large lotus by artist Choi Jeong Hwa one notices that it appears to be full of life, its petals slowly inhaling and exhaling. This is typical of the work of Choi, who takes pleasure in giving new life and meaning to otherwise inanimate and disregarded materials. Long a familiar flower in Asia and associated with both Hindu and Buddhist mythology, the lotus is remarkable for its ability to emerge from murky waters and mud, and blossom into an elegant flower. Choi created his lotus from everyday materials that, unlike a real lotus, will never disintegrate and die, and ultimately urge the viewer to meditate on the beauty and fragility of the natural world around us.”