Posts Tagged ‘Philippines’

San Francisco Named Balboa Street to Honor a Man Famous for Killing LGBTs in Central America – Why Not Change It?

Thursday, June 20th, 2013

Balboa Park, Balboa 31X, Balboa Street – there are lots of examples.

Now let’s check and see what Vasco Núñez de Balboa did to be so honored.

Oh, here it is:

Balboa setting his dogs upon Indian practitioners of male love (1594) The Spanish invader Vasco Núñez de Balboa (1475-1519) shown in Central America with his troops, presiding over the execution of Indians, whom he ordered eaten alive by the war dogs for having practiced male love. New York Public Library, Rare Book Room, De Bry Collection, New York.

Oh and we honor Funston too?

Oh well

 

San Francisco Welcomes South Korean Navy – Gangam Style on Market Street – Shopping at Macy’s

Wednesday, October 3rd, 2012

Here they are:

Click to expand

[UPDATE: Upon further review, these aren’t Chinese naval uniforms after all:

At first I thought they could have been from the Chinese People’s Liberation Army Navy.

And oh, look what’s on the PLAN’s to-do list:

See that? In addition to taking over Japanese islands (the Senkakus and others), the neo-Imperial Chinese Navy wants to take over Vietnamese, Malaysian, Filipino, and Bruneian islands as well. And don’t forget about Taiwan.

But we’re being visited by a South Korean ship so it’s all good.]

Should San Francisco Be Making Trade Deals With China, In Light of Its Bullying of Vietnam, the Philippines, and Others?

Tuesday, July 24th, 2012

So today’s the day of the big ceremony with elements of the single-party state known as the People’s Republic of China announcing some kind of trade deal with the City and County of San Francisco.

So let’s check the international news. Seems as if the Chinese Navy recently went down to the Philippines to establish a new “city” called Sansha. I think it was yesterday.

Check it:

Beijing’s planned deployment of a military garrison to Sansha brought a swift response from President Aquino. He said, “If someone entered your yard and told you he owned it, would you agree? Would it be right to give away that which is rightfully ours?” Protesters hold banners while chanting slogans during an anti-China protest along a street in Hanoi, July 22, 2012. ​​Vietnam has also criticized the establishment of Sansha, calling it “serious violation” of Hanoi’s sovereignty over the Paracel and Spratly chains, which it claims as part of Danang city and Khanh Hoa province respectively.”

Here’s a map of territorial claims in the oceanic area betwixt Vietnam and the Philippines. Do you see which county is farthest away? That’s right, it’s China. And do you see which country has the biggest claim? That’s right, it’s also China. Why is that?

Historically, other countries have had imperial ambitions in this part of the world, of course. But these days it’s all China all the time.

Is that a good thing?

Now let’s hear from Chinese Consulate advisor / Mayor Ed Lee advisor Rose Pak – perhaps she could shed some light:

When asked what message she would like to convey to the Chinese government, Pak said, “On what moral ground do we have as United States citizens lecturing what China should do when our own President would drum up falsehoods and bomb Iraq back to the stone-age, killing several hundred thousand innocent Iraqis.”

“Look at all the problems in the world, (they) are all created by Western countries with their phony-baloney moral standards,” Pak added.”

OK fine.

Tonight’s NightLife at the California Academy of Sciences Shares Scientific News from the Philippines

Thursday, June 30th, 2011

OMG, it’s a Filipino NightLife! June 30th, tonight only, starting at 6:00 PM in Golden Gate Park.

(I like the NightLife, Baby! She says, “Let’s go.”)

Our CalAcademy goes on expeditions all the time – find out what they’ve just found.

Stephanie Stone, California Academy of Sciences

Stephanie Stone, California Academy of Sciences

All the deets, below.

See you there!

California Academy of Sciences June NightLife Event Shares Scientific News from the Philippines

Thursday, June 30 at 6 PM

Our Scientists are back—be among the first to see what we’ve discovered

WHAT: At a special NightLife event on June 30, guests 21+ will be among the first to hear about the many new species discovered by scientists from the California Academy of Sciences in a recent expedition to the Philippines. This project was the most comprehensive scientific survey ever conducted in the Philippines.

For six weeks this spring, dozens of Academy scientists hiked, sweat and dove their way through this biodiversity hotspot to explore and document animal and plant life located in shallow coral reefs, deep sea and mountain forests.

Come hear their fascinating stories at this special NightLife. Newly discovered species include:

· A deep-sea swell shark—a shark that fills itself up with water to seem bigger and ward off predators
· “Laughing” cicada—an insect with the ability to make a high-pitched laughing sound
· Various nudibranch species—more commonly known as sea slugs, that have been overlooked in the past because of their tiny size

At this revealing edition of NightLife, guests will be able to explore new specimens from the expedition and experience a special preview of the results, straight from the scientists themselves. Guests will enjoy Filipino music, folk dance performances and delicious traditional Filipino food.

WHO:
· Fire urchins, ghost pipefish, a coconut octopus and other new arrivals as ambassadors to their ecosystem
· Kulintronica will be performing modern and gong music of the Philippines along with dancers from the Mabuhay Folkloric Society
· DJ Chicken Scratch and Marky (a.k.a. “Proof”) will be spinning some tunes
· Ramar Foods will offer tastes of traditional Filipino food
· Alberto A. Lim, (Cabinet Secretary, Philippines Department of Tourism) will introduce performances

WHEN: Thursday, June 30
6:00 PM – 10:00 PM

COST: $12 per person/ $10 for Academy members
Adults 21 and up

WHERE: The California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
Golden Gate Park
San Francisco, CA 94118

For more information: http://www.calacademy.org/events/nightlife/

That’s How They Get You: San Francisco’s Costco Sells Jollibee Gift Cards But Our Sole Jollibee is All Shut Down

Monday, December 20th, 2010

Now, you’d think that San Francisco would have a straight-outta-Quezon City Jollibee Chicken & Burgers fast foodery but you’d be wrong. We used to have one down near that whole Lapu Lapu, Mabini, Bonifacio, Rizal alley maze situation in the SoMA, but  it’s gone. Our sole JB is all gone.

So what’s the point of getting this card to give away for Christmas if all you’re doing is forcing the recipient to journey to another county or state to cash it in?

Click to expand

Next thing you know, our Costco #144 will be selling Sonic gift cards.

Anyway, that’s how they get you.

  • Amar
  • Beverly Blvd.
  • Carson
  • Cerritos
  • Chino Towne Spectrum
  • Daly City
  • Eagle Rock Plaza
  • Great Mall Milpitas
  • Jollibee Concord
  • Mira Mesa
  • National City
  • Panorama City
  • Puente Hills Mall
  • Sacramento
  • San Bruno
  • San Jose
  • Southbay Pavillion
  • Stockton
  • Union City
  • Vallejo
  • Westfield Plaza Bonita
  • Westfield Plaza West Covina
  • Resolved: Funston Should be Renamed 13th Avenue – Why Honor a Filipino-Killing Cracker?

    Tuesday, June 8th, 2010

    Isn’t superstition such a second-millenium, High Middle Ages kind of thing, don’t you think? Isn’t superstition the reason our foreparents named l’avenue betwixt 12th and 14th after Frederick Funston? I mean, why else would they have done that?

    Let’s meet Freddie Funston, 13th Avenue’s temporary namesake:

    I personally strung up thirty-five Filipinos without trial… Impromptu domestic hanging might also hasten the end of the war. For starters, all Americans who had recently petitioned Congress to sue for peace in the Philippines should be dragged out of their homes and lynched.”

    O.K. then. (Make that Filipino-killing super-cracker.) Famous Mark Twain even penned a mock-defense of Freddie-boy in a sarcastic essay.

    Cheek by jowl – one frees you, the other kills you:

    Now, what about this? Did Freddie-boy represent the feds after the 1906 Earthquake the same way Michael “heckofajobBrownie” Brown represented the feds after Hurricane Katrina? Well, this bit in the San Francisco Chronicle from four years ago certainly makes the case.

    But, You Make The Call. Here’s Funston taking charge of San Francisco during the Great Fire of 1906, as if martial law had been declared (it wasn’t, IRL):

    “Gen. Funston sends in the first military demolition squad. The incompetence by which they dynamite buildings causes the outbreak of four new fires.

    “General Funston now attempts to encircle the fire in the heart of the city with systematic destruction of buildings. A drugstore at Clay and Kearny is blown up with black powder. A flaming mattress from the flat above is launched across the street setting fire to Chinatown.

    “At 5 pm the next morning, the order came down from Mayor Schmitz that the dynamiting should stop. But the order comes too late to stop the exploding of a building on Green Street. The explosion ignites a previously untouched area and this new fire spreads along Green Street aided by a gale-force wind. 5 pm that afternoonFunston gives the order to resume the shelling of Van Ness Avenue against the direct orders of Mayor Schmitz in what seems to many to be senseless destruction. There are mounting reports of the excesses of the troops, including rape, indecent assault and grievous bodily harm.”

    Heck of a job, Freddie! Actually, he screwed up so bad he had to try to defend hisself in the pages of Comso (I’m seriously, freaking Cosmopoliton “77 Positions in 77 Days” Magazine.)

    So, now you’re armed with two good arguments for changing the name of 13th Avenue back to 13th Avenue.* We’ll get the City take down the Funston signs post-haste and then we ought to let the residents continue to use the name Funston as long as they want. Somebody’ll even write a memo to the USPS to keep things straight with mail delivery.

    D’accord? D’accord.

    *In the alternative, other substitute names like Genocide Avenue or Triskaidekaphobia Avenue could also be acceptable.

    At the Presidio: Just One Month Left for “War and Dissent: U.S. in the Philippines”

    Tuesday, January 20th, 2009

    This link will get you up to speed on the big exhibit at San Francisco’s Presidio - “War and Dissent: The U.S. in the Philippines 1898-1915.” But the show’s over on February 22, 2009, so there’s just one month left to get up there. Tomorrow night, as promised, there’ll be a slide presentation and book signing by authors Abraham Ignacio and Jorge Emmanuel.

    See you there!

    THE POLITICS OF CARTOONS: EXPLORING THE FORBIDDEN BOOK IN THE PRESIDIO
     
    The Making of The Forbidden Book: The Philippine-American War in Political Cartoons                     

    As part of the War & Dissent exhibit at the Presidio, a unique slide presentation and discussion will be led by authors of THE FORBIDDEN BOOK, Abraham Ignacio and Jorge Emmanuel.  A book signing will follow the presentation.
     
    Through a combination of text and extraordinary cartoons, THE FORBIDDEN BOOK explores the media’s portrayal of American conquest during the period of the Philippine-American War.
     
    Wednesday, January 21, 2009 at 7:00 PM, Presidio Officers’ Club, 50 Moraga Avenue, San Francisco
                                        Free Admission
     
                FREE EXHIBIT: War and Dissent: The U.S. in the Philippines 1898-1915
    The Spanish American War of 1898 and the Philippine War that immediately followed it were turning points in both the United States’ role in the world and in the history of the Presidio of San Francisco. This free, mixed-media exhibit, tells the story of a little-known war that had momentous consequences for both Americans and Filipinos. The exhibit chronicles the growth of the Presidio into a major military installation and the rise of the United States into an imperial power. It explores the dissent that erupted around the war and examines the war through the eyes of a Filipino family caught in the conflict and an American soldier who trained at the Presidio. The exhibit’s nine themed galleries feature San Francisco monuments, photographs, diaries, letters and political cartoon that trace the full sweep of the conflict.
     
                                        War and Dissent: The U.S. in the Philippines 1898-1915
                                        Through February 22 at the Presidio Officers’ Club
                                        50 Moraga Avenue, San Francisco
                                        Wednesday-Sunday 11am-5pm
                                        Free Admission

    “War and Dissent: U.S. in the Philippines” Continues in the Presidio

    Thursday, November 6th, 2008

    The War and Dissent: U.S. in the Philippines 1898-1915 exhibit will continue in the Presidio until February 22nd, 2009. It’s a nice collection of detailed wall displays that would be especially appropriate for school tours.

    Check out famous but obscure Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base in this graphic. The U.S. government sends a rent check (about what you’d pay for a large apartment in Pacific Heights) over every month that the Cuban government (almost always) refuses to cash. Click to expand:

    See you there!

    SPECIAL EVENTS

    Shadows of War Performance: The Lopez Family in the Philippines 1901
    Four Thursday Performances from 7 to 8 pm: November 6, December 4, January 8, and February 5.
    Presidio Officers’ Club
    Produced by San Francisco’s Bindlestiff Studio, this multi-media dramatic production inspired by the exhibition will feature Filipino-American actors and live music.

    The Making of The Forbidden Book: The Philippine-American War in Political Cartoons
    Wednesday, January 21, 2009, 7 – 8 pm Presidio Officers’ Club
    A slide presentation by authors Abraham Ignacio and Jorge Emmanuel. A book signing will follow the talk.

    New Exhibit at the Presidio – War and Dissent: U.S. in the Philippines

    Thursday, October 23rd, 2008

    War and Dissent: U.S. in the Philippines 1898-1915
    October 22, 2008 – February 22, 2009
    Wednesday to Sunday, 11 am to 5 pm
    Presidio Officers’ Club, 50 Moraga Avenue
    FREE!

    This was the scene last night in the Presidio as curator and historian Dr. Randy Delehanty showed off the first of nine galleries at the Presidio Officers’ Club. 

    You should check it out. Related events below.

    Click to expand:

    The Spanish-American War of 1898 — and the Philippine War that immediately followed it — were turning points in the United States’ role in the world and had a great impact on the Presidio of San Francisco. The war in the Philippines also triggered strong dissent within the United States as the nation changed from a republic based on the consent of the governed to the possessor of a colonial empire.

    This mixed media exhibit of photographs, San Francisco monuments, diaries, letters, political cartoons, recordings, maps, and flags looks at the Spanish-American and Philippine Wars from several points of view, including Filipino points of view, in nine themed galleries.

    SPECIAL EVENTS

    History Comes Alive
    Saturday, October 25, 11 am – 3 pm
    Pershing Square, across from Presidio Officers’ Club
    How did soldiers feel as they prepared to ship out to the Philippines? A recreated army encampment presented by the National Park Service will feature uniformed re-enactors and the voices for and against America’s first overseas war.

    Shadows of War Performance: The Lopez Family in the Philippines 1901
    Four Thursday Performances from 7 to 8 pm: November 6, December 4, January 8, and February 5.
    Presidio Officers’ Club
    Produced by San Francisco’s Bindlestiff Studio, this multi-media dramatic production inspired by the exhibition will feature Filipino-American actors and live music.

    Redmond Kernan Lecture Series: Meet the Chair of the Philippines National Historical Institute
    Wednesday, October 29, 7 – 8:30 pm
    Presidio Officers’ Club
    Filipino historian, journalist, academic, and author Ambeth Ocampo offers his perspective on the Philippines War of Independence. Ocampo is the chair of the Philippines National Historical Institute and chair of the National Commission for Culture in the Arts.

    The Making of The Forbidden Book: The Philippine-American War in Political Cartoons
    Wednesday, January 21, 2009, 7 – 8 pm
    Presidio Officers’ Club
    A slide presentation by authors Abraham Ignacio and Jorge Emmanuel. A book signing will follow the talk.