Posts Tagged ‘place’

A New Lunch Place in the Financh: TSUKIJI NO DONBURI-MONO from THE GRUBBIES – $200 for Sea Urchin and Rice?

Thursday, October 13th, 2016

I’m taking things slow here. Peasant Pies is gone from 303 Sacramento. In its place is this joint with no seating. This is a real business registered with SFGov.

TSUKIJI suggests Tokyo’s world-famous fish market. Donburi means rice bowl – rice plus something else, in this case seafood. And THE GRUBBIES means I don’t know what.

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Now, check out the asking prices. If you want to go hog-wild, you can order UNI  plus rice for $40 to $200(!) – click on the photo to see the prices. Is this meant for more than one person? IDK. I’m not sure how many servings of sea urchin gonads plus rice you’d get. Isn’t this a lot of money for lunch? (In mitigation, you can wash down your meal with a can of soda, for just $1 more.)

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I’m not sure if they’re suggesting the seafood is flown in from Japan or if this place is just similar to a Japanese fish market. I’ll tell you, there was a Yoshinoya fast food donburi place what tried to make a go of it about a block away from here. They served inexpensive “beef bowls,” like something a taxi driver would eat on break. They didn’t last long.

But this place is different – it’s expensive, and all seafood AFAICS. It’s not at all on social media AFAIK. It’s terra incognita, foodies!

Have at it.

Here’s All What’s Left of 1994’s Giant “Gold Mountain” Mural at Romolo Place in North Beach – Graffiti

Thursday, July 21st, 2016

First, the giant mural of Romolo was all like this:

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But now it’s all like this – I haven’t been through this way since it got painted over, thusly:

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Due to this:

“I’m done with them. That’s why the mural is painted over,” Sherry said. She said that during the 2004 restoration, which took almost a year, she worked on the mural six days a week for almost a year and was only compensated for transportation and lunch. “It was an absolute nightmare,” she said. “All they could pay me was coming out of their poor little pockets, so I accepted it because at the time I could afford to take a lot of time to do this. … So I basically just did the work, and they let it go to hell again.

There was a theory that murals discourage graffiti. I don’t know well that theory worked out…

Dennis Herrera Throws Down: Cracking Down on Developer Angelo Sangiacomo – TRINITY APTS / “SOMA SUITES HOTEL”

Tuesday, September 8th, 2015

Here’s a new update on this sitch.

“Herrera subpoenas Trinity over rent-controlled apartments used as ‘SOMA Suites Hotel’

“After request for cooperation is met ‘with obfuscation and deflection of responsibility,’ City Attorney moves to compel production of evidence in housing investigation

“SAN FRANCISCO (Sept. 8, 2015) — City Attorney Dennis Herrera today formally subpoenaed documents and information relating to the apparently illegal use of Trinity Place residential units — including at least 16 rent-controlled apartments — for tourist accommodations as “The SOMA Suites Hotel.” The administrative subpoenas served on Trinity’s ownership and a single lessee of some 23 dwellings comes after a month of “repeated, unsuccessful attempts” by Herrera’s office to gain voluntary cooperation in a City Attorney investigation of potentially unlawful and unauthorized uses of the properties at 1188 and 1190 Mission Street.

Herrera initially requested cooperation from developer Angelo Sangiacomo and his legal counsel in an Aug. 5, 2015 letter that sought a full account of the uses of residential units authorized under the city’s 2007 agreement for the Trinity Plaza Development Project (since renamed Trinity Place). But the request was instead met “with obfuscation and deflection of responsibility,” according to a letter from Herrera that accompanied his subpoena to compel Trinity’s production of requested evidence.

“I find your responses on behalf of your clients particularly difficult to accept given the nature and history of the properties,” Herrera wrote to Trinity’s attorney, Andrew Wiegel. “The Trinity Plaza Development Project permitted your client to build high-density, largely residential buildings that, among other things, would preserve 360 units of rent-controlled housing. The benefits of those units that your client committed to provide in the Development Agreement continue to be critically important to the City, especially at a time where the paucity of affordable housing is driving out long-term residents, disrupting communities, and altering the very fabric of our City. Leasing a number of those units to the same individual, under the facts and circumstances we believe to have been the case, violates the letter and spirit of the Development Agreement, and the conditions of approval for the Project.”

A primary focus of the investigation Herrera identified in his letter is the developer’s business relationship with Catherine Zhang and her company, LUMI Worldwide. According to evidence so far established in the City Attorney investigation, Trinity Management Services entered into leases with Zhang for 16 apartments, each subject to rent-control, and each exclusively intended for residential occupancy. Apart from recognizing the obvious — that a single individual can’t simultaneously reside in 16 apartments — Trinity’s management knew that Zhang was subleasing the rent-controlled units, according to Herrera, in apparent violation of its own lease provisions expressly forbidding subletting, and its development agreement with the city. The arrangement may also violate state and local law.

“Leasing a number of those units to the same individual, under the facts and circumstances we believe to have been the case, violates the letter and spirit of the Development Agreement, and the conditions of approval for the Project,” Herrera wrote. “For these reasons, you have left me no choice but to formally subpoena this information.”

Apart from the 16 rent-controlled apartments at 1188 Mission Street (where “The SOMA Suites Hotel” is located, according to its marketing content), another seven Trinity Place apartments at neighboring 1190 Mission Street were also leased to Zhang for concurrent and overlapping periods. Evidence indicates that Zhang similarly subleased those apartments to tourists for short-term stays. Although none of the apartments at 1190 Mission Street is subject to rent-control, the use of dwellings in both buildings is restricted to residential housing under terms of the 2007 development agreement and related City approvals. Herrera today served a similar administrative subpoena on Zhang and LUMI Worldwide.

Additional documentation from the City Attorney’s Office’s investigation is available at: http://www.sfcityattorney.org/.

Trouble for “SOMA SUITES HOTEL” – Rent Controlled Units Leased to Tourists? – City Attorney Dennis Herrera v. Angelo Sangiacomo

Thursday, August 6th, 2015

Just released by the City Attorney’s Office

“Herrera demands answers from Trinity Place on tourist uses of rent-controlled dwellings – Investigation finds evidence that nearly two-dozen residential apartments—including 16 rent-controlled units—were apparently leased to tourists as ‘SOMA Suites Hotel’

SAN FRANCISCO (Aug. 6, 2015)—A major residential development project, hailed as “the Miracle of Mission Street” for overcoming years of opposition with promised benefits including 360 new apartments designated as rent-controlled, is facing scrutiny over apparently unlawful uses of residential dwellings for short-term tourist accommodations. City Attorney Dennis Herrera publicly acknowledged his office’s investigation into the potentially unlawful and unauthorized uses at 1188 and 1190 Mission Street in a letter delivered yesterday to Trinity Place developer Angelo Sangiacomo and counsel.

According to the letter, Herrera’s investigation found that at least 16 rent-controlled apartments, all intended as replacement units for residents at 1188 Mission Street, were instead leased to a single individual for the apparent purpose of marketing them as short-term tourist rentals. Another seven apartments in neighboring 1190 Mission Street were similarly leased to the same person for concurrent and overlapping periods, with evidence indicating those units were also then rented to tourists for short-term stays. Although apartments at 1190 Mission Street are not subject to rent-control, the required use of dwellings in both buildings is residential housing, under terms of the 2007 development agreement between Sangiacomo and the City and related City approvals.

The findings corroborate other evidence Herrera identified in his office’s investigation that Trinity Place dwellings have been marketed for transient occupancy as “The SOMA Suites Hotel,” an unincorporated and apparently unregistered entity that identifies its location to prospective hotel guests as 1188 Mission Street in San Francisco.

“For those of us who worked on the agreement, the full promise of Trinity Place wasn’t solely about 1,900 units of badly needed housing,” Herrera said. “It was also about proving that developers, city officials and the community could resolve differences creatively, and rise to the challenge of our housing shortage. What makes this apparent misuse so disappointing is that it betrays that promise on both counts. The conduct, if it is what it appears to be, reduces the number of apartments that should rightfully be available to San Francisco renters, and they undermine the trust necessary to make similar progress in the future. It’s my hope that Mr. Sangiacomo will appreciate the seriousness of this apparent wrongdoing. I hope, too, that he will cooperate with our investigation, and fully remedy all violations that may have occurred to restore the good faith and trust that made this project possible.”

Herrera’s letter requests the full cooperation of Sangiacomo and his agents in his office’s investigation, to thoroughly account for the uses of the rent controlled units and other residential units authorized under the Trinity Place development agreement since its execution. The letter specifically requests documents, contracts, leases and other information detailing financial relationships among Sangiacomo’s business interests and individuals and companies identified in Herrera’s investigation that appear to be involved in the short term rental violations.”

Oh, the Urbanity! Incoming SF Bicycle Coalition Director Noah Budnick is Looking for a 2-Bedroom Apartment for _Less_ than $3K per Month

Friday, December 19th, 2014

Wow, a person made a post trying to help out incoming San Francisco Bicycle Coalition Director Noah Budnick by getting the word out about an apartment hunt

And check it, the poster is just like me, as he doesn’t agree with with everything the SFBC does AND he thinks the SFBC is an effective advocacy group.

And here it is:

“While I don’t agree with everything SFBC does, it is certainly the most effective advocacy group I’ve ever belonged to. And here’s a way to help them: by finding  their new director, who is moving here from the east coast, an apartment in San Francisco. I know xx#xers care a lot about bicycle advocacy, and we all know that finding an apartment here is a bloodsport where knowing tenants and landlords is a definite advantage, hence this message.

Desired attributes:
• Close to a BART stop
• Two bedrooms
• Less than $3,000/month

If you have any leads, please email me and I’ll make the connection.”

The kicker is that NY Noah wants his crib to be in SF and he wants it to be close to a BART stop.

(IDK, these requirements rule out Crackton as an option.)

I think I’d advise young Noah to lower his expectations, but who knows – it’s in any event smart to get the word out.

This was the first of many replies:

“Awwwww, he’s adorable. I hear Daly City is nice…”

Ouch.

Now lately, the SFBC has stopped boasting of its increasing membership, because lately membership is way down – thousands of people have decided not to re-up. Now why is that?

Mmmm…

Now you tell me – which is a bigger problem to solve? Is it:

1. Finding a “nice” 2-bed close to BART for $2K-something in 2014; or

2. Finding 2K-something more people to join the SFBC AND then get them continue paying dues, year after year.

That’s a toughie.

And the Richmond District’s Biggest Illegal Parking Violator is … Giorgio’s Pizzeria, 151 Clement Street

Wednesday, May 14th, 2014

When I come across Giorgio of Giorgio’s Pizzeria, I’ll say, “Hey Gio, how come you ain’t got no brothers up on the wall here?”

And then, regardless of the answer, I’ll follow up with a question about why he doesn’t arrange for a place to park his Prius and whatever delivery vehicles, you know, legally.

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(In mitigation, this joint is a viable institution of the Richmond District and I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend it if you’re looking for an old-school pizza place out in the Avenues…)

The Scariest Halloween Decorations in Town This Year are Windows 21, 22, and 23 at the Fell Street DMV

Tuesday, October 8th, 2013

Ah, memories:

I remember when Halloween in the 415 was pretend scary instead of DMV scary.

Ah memories.

Remember the Queen of Hearts and the Queen of Diamonds at Castro Halloween?

The stage at 16th, Market, and Noe. A kid from one of San Francisco’s housing projects got mad and shot nine people a little later on this particular evening. Nobody died though:

The Raiders and Niners fans what showed up were generally better behaved than the actual fans at the stadiums:

An ocean of people at 17th, Market and Castro, a few years back:

Ah, memories

Apparently, Twitter Doesn’t Need This Mid-Market Bus Stop, So Out it Comes: “Rider Alert, Stop Discontinued”

Wednesday, January 23rd, 2013

Market Street inbound, near Sixth Street – the place where white women will soon be trying on fragile, expensive shoes:

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Now you’d think Twitter might want to have more bus stops in the corrupt Twitterloin, but the Twitter Express #1 (privately-funded) and the Twitter Express #2 (publicly-funded) both avoid this area when coming and going to and from the CalTrain station.

Oh well.

Forget About That CityPlace Mall in Mid-Market – The New Name is “Market Street Place” and Work has Begun

Wednesday, September 19th, 2012

That proposed CityPlace mall has a new name and they’ve just started working on getting it built.

See?

“…its name has been changed to Market Street Place, reflecting how even this blighted part of San Francisco’s main thoroughfare...”

And see? 

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This is all new. The whitewash went up on Monday, I think, and now we have the ads what say SHOPPING PLACE and whatnot.

This is what it will look like, without the homeless and the criminals and the iPhone fences and the drug dealers milling around out front:

More photorealistic:

Reverse angle:

The mall has it all. Actually, it’s a mall like any other from Anytown, USA. (Boy, John King is going to looooooove this, huh?)

All right, now let’s all thank the Carlyle Group for helping us out:

“The following is a list of both current and former employees and advisors.

Business

Political figures

North America
Europe

Gold Mountain Mural in North Beach is Gone, Long Gone, Owing to Graffiti Vandals – Why We Can’t Have Nice Things

Friday, March 9th, 2012

The news of this mural going away had escaped my attention the past couple of months.

Here’s what it looked like before….

…and here’s what it looks like now:

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Here are your reading notes:

Gen Fujioka of the Chinatown Community Development Center is involved with promoting the horrible Central Subway to Nowhere.

Artist Ann Sherry is fortunate to get a five-figure commission for anything, so I’m not sure why she’s so perpetually cranky. 

It’s not smart to put up images of authority figures (you know, people in military of police uniforms) in a sort of wild part of town

I don’t know, maybe this was a bad idea from the start?

I don’t know, maybe San Francisco government has lots of bad ideas, you know, from the start?

What can we learn from this episode?