Posts Tagged ‘plum’

Now That It’s March, You Can Assume That the Blooming Cherry Trees You See Are Not Actually Plum – Oh, Here’s One

Tuesday, March 22nd, 2016

The fake cherry trees of January are now a deep purple, ’cause they’re plum trees.

That means that the cherry trees you see these days are real cherry.

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Accept no substitutes…

Cherry Trees Bloomed in April When You Were Young, But Now You See Blooms All Over Frisco In January – Global Warming? NOPE!

Tuesday, February 2nd, 2016

Here’s your view, here’s what you can reliably see all over Frisco these days, typically starting in late January each and every year:

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The problem with comparing these trees to the cherry trees of your youth is that you’re comparing apples to oranges, or IRL, ornamental plums (Prunus cerasifera, you know known and grown for it’s very early flowering) to cherries.

Thank you, drive through.

It’s Orange Bird Season in California! Our Best-Looking Native Bird Has Got To Be … The Hooded Oriole

Wednesday, April 22nd, 2015

Your pet-store Cherry-Headed Conures certainly are handsome animules (see below), but our Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill don’t really belong in Frisco, not really.

So the Hooded Oriole takes the crown

Here’s one [oh, if you want to add your comment to all the others, use this link] at Golden Gate Park’s Stow Lake from, IDK, a decade ago? This male has a blush of orange, as is typical for this time of year – they generally have more of a pure yellow color at other times:

Here’s an effort from Bob Gunderson‘s Dust Trombone from a few years back – dese boids are all over the place dese days, so enjoy them while they last.

Now here are your beauty champs from the 415’s Import Division:

A friendly pair in the Presidio. 

They love to fly

and eat flowers.

Look to the skies…

An Energetic Street Youth Makes It “Snow” in the Western Addition by Climbing Up a Plum Tree and Shaking It

Friday, February 20th, 2015


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And if you think this a cherry tree, I’ll ask you what color the leaves are, and you’ll say plum, and I’ll say BINGO! Even in J-town, the blossoms you see are from plum trees…

The Reason Why the Late Winter Cherry Blossoms You’re Seeing in San Francisco ARE NOT Proof of Global Warming

Thursday, January 29th, 2015

What’s that, when you were a mere pup cherry trees blossomed in March or April and now you’re seeing blooms in late January and the start of February?

Like here on Grove yesterday, and all over SF pretty soon:

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But actually, the trees you’re seeing are actually flowering plums, which are known for their early blooms. So what you’re doing is comparing apples with oranges, or cherries with plums.

And actually, the plum blossoms are late this year, at least compared with recent history.

What’s that, plum and cherry are basically the same? NOPE. They’re in the same family, of course, but the flowering plums that you think are cherries are famous for early blooming.

What’s that, you just saw the blooms in Japantown, so you know you saw cherry trees? NOPE. J-town has a lot of new plum trees, for whatever reason.

What’s that, global warming IS happening? Well, no doubt, but that’s not the reason why you think the cherry trees of your youth are blooming three months earlier these days.

I’ll agree that these trees are closely related and that they look very similar.

(If you still don’t believe me, check the Urban Forest Map.)

A Riot of Color in Golden Gate Park: Our Dahlia Dell is Still Going Strong, in November

Tuesday, November 18th, 2014

The Dahlia Dell in Golden Gate Park had a lot more color back in September, but there are still some flowers there in mid-November. See?

The colors, man – groove on the colors:

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And what’s right around the corner? The flowering plum tree blossoms of January

I suppose December is our worst month for flowers – I’ll look for some around town in a few weeks…

Road Rage, Western Addition – RRAAARR! – Mopar Madness, Plum Crazy

Friday, August 8th, 2014

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April Fools! Those “Cherry” Trees You Saw Blooming in January are Actually Plums – Yes, Even in Japantown – Proof

Tuesday, April 1st, 2014

Here’s your proof, here’s how things are looking in Buchanan Plaza in April 2014:

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That would be a couple plums on the left and genuine cherry on the right.

Why did people plant plum trees in J-Town? IDK, perhaps to make it look like we had cherry trees blooming in mid-winter?

Anyway, proof promised, proof delivered.

Cherry Blossoms Blooming in January is NOT Due to Global Warming – Why? The Answer Will Amaze You – One Weird Trick

Monday, January 27th, 2014

(I’ll just say that if you ever earnestly Tweet a link to Chuckworthy, I’ll Unfollow you in a New York minute. That’s how I roll.)

What’s that, when you were a tyke, cherry trees bloomed in April and now they’re blooming in late January because of that darn global warming?

Well yeah, but what you’re looking at aint cherry trees, they’re plum trees, muchacho/a.

See? Plum:

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What’s that, you just saw them in J-Town, so they must be cherry trees? NOPE! What you saw was Prunus cerasifera, a kind of plum. Yes, they planted plums on Post Street on purpose, to stagger the blooms from winter to spring, one supposes. Go back to Japantown in April and you’ll see blossoms from the real deal, Prunus serrulata aka Japanese Cherry, Hill Cherry, Oriental Cherry, East Asian Cherry, or soon enough, East Sea Cherry for all I know.

What’s that, Prunus cerasifera’s common name is cherry plum so close enough? NOPE! Cherry is cherry and plum is plum.

What’s that, global warming is real and trees are blossoming earlier and earlier? MAYBE SO! But just don’t call plum trees cherry trees, that’s what I’m saying. That’s the “one weird trick.”


All right, here you go, here’s a genuine cherry tree during late January in the 415:

Cherries will be blooming soon enough.

Until then, enjoy eating plum blossoms, as this Wild Parrot of Telegraph Hill did near the Financial one winter long ago:

Photos from Asian Art Museum’s “In the Moment: Japanese Art from the Larry Ellison Collection” – Opens June 2013

Thursday, September 20th, 2012

Here’s the big news from Kenneth Baker yesterday.

More deets:

“Called “In the Moment: Japanese Art from the Larry Ellison Collection,” the exhibit will include works by noted artists of the Momoyama (1573—1615) and Edo (1615—1868) periods along a 13th—14th century wooden sculpture of Shotoku Taishi; six-panel folding screens dating to the 17th century by Kano Sansetsu; and 18th century paintings by acclaimed masters Maruyama Okyo and Ito Jakuchu.”

This should be an excellent show.

All photos courtesy of the Asian Art Museum:

Shotoku Taishi as an Infant, Unknown, Kamakura period (1249-1335). Wood with polychromy. Larry Ellison Collection

Tigers (detail), 1779. By Maruyama Okyo (Japanese, 1733-1795). One of a pair of hanging scrolls; ink and light colors on paper. Larry Ellison Collection.

Auspicious Pine, Bamboo, Plum, Crane and Turtles, Edo period (1615-1868),ca. 1630-1650. By Kano Sansetsu (Japanese, 1590-1651,By Sansetsu, Kano 1590-1651. One of a pair of six panel folding screens. Ink and colors on gold. Larry Ellison Collection

Oh, and don’t forget about Korean Culture Day this Sunday, September 23, 2012. It’s free!

Asian Art Museum debuts Ellison’s Japanese art collection, coinciding with 2013 America’s Cup

SAN FRANCISCO, September 20, 2012—Next summer, as the America’s Cup Challenger Series takes to San Francisco Bay, the Asian Art Museum will feature an exhibition of Japanese art from the rarely seen collection of Larry Ellison, Oracle CEO and owner of ORACLE TEAM USA, defender of the 2013 America’s Cup.

In the Moment: Japanese Art from the Larry Ellison Collection will introduce approximately 80 exceptional artworks spanning 1,300 years. The exhibition explores the dynamic nature of art selection and display in traditional Japanese settings, where artworks are often temporarily presented in response to a special occasion or to reflect the change of seasons. In the Moment also considers Mr. Ellison’s active involvement in displaying art in his Japanese-style home, shedding light on his appreciation for Japan’s art and culture.

Included in the exhibition are significant works by noted artists of the Momoyama (1573–1615) and Edo (1615–1868) periods along with other important examples of religious art, lacquer, woodwork, and metalwork. Highlights include a 13th–14th century wooden sculpture of Shotoku Taishi; six-panel folding screens dating to the 17th century by Kano Sansetsu; and 18th century paintings by acclaimed masters Maruyama Okyo and Ito Jakuchu.

“This exhibition offers a rare glimpse of an extraordinary collection,” said Jay Xu, director of the Asian Art Museum. “We aim to present it in a fresh and original way that explores traditional Japanese principles governing the relationship of art to our surroundings and social relationships.”

The exhibition is organized by the Asian Art Museum and curated by Dr. Laura Allen, the museum’s curator of Japanese art, and Melissa Rinne, associate curator of Japanese art, in consultation with Mr. Ellison’s curator, Dr. Emily Sano.

The exhibition is on view June 28, 2013 through September 22, 2013. The Asian Art Museum will serve as the only venue for the exhibition.

For more information visit: