Posts Tagged ‘plum’

Road Rage, Western Addition – RRAAARR! – Mopar Madness, Plum Crazy

Friday, August 8th, 2014

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April Fools! Those “Cherry” Trees You Saw Blooming in January are Actually Plums – Yes, Even in Japantown – Proof

Tuesday, April 1st, 2014

Here’s your proof, here’s how things are looking in Buchanan Plaza in April 2014:

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That would be a couple plums on the left and genuine cherry on the right.

Why did people plant plum trees in J-Town? IDK, perhaps to make it look like we had cherry trees blooming in mid-winter?

Anyway, proof promised, proof delivered.

Cherry Blossoms Blooming in January is NOT Due to Global Warming – Why? The Answer Will Amaze You – One Weird Trick

Monday, January 27th, 2014

(I’ll just say that if you ever earnestly Tweet a link to Chuckworthy, I’ll Unfollow you in a New York minute. That’s how I roll.)

What’s that, when you were a tyke, cherry trees bloomed in April and now they’re blooming in late January because of that darn global warming?

Well yeah, but what you’re looking at aint cherry trees, they’re plum trees, muchacho/a.

See? Plum:

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What’s that, you just saw them in J-Town, so they must be cherry trees? NOPE! What you saw was Prunus cerasifera, a kind of plum. Yes, they planted plums on Post Street on purpose, to stagger the blooms from winter to spring, one supposes. Go back to Japantown in April and you’ll see blossoms from the real deal, Prunus serrulata aka Japanese Cherry, Hill Cherry, Oriental Cherry, East Asian Cherry, or soon enough, East Sea Cherry for all I know.

What’s that, Prunus cerasifera’s common name is cherry plum so close enough? NOPE! Cherry is cherry and plum is plum.

What’s that, global warming is real and trees are blossoming earlier and earlier? MAYBE SO! But just don’t call plum trees cherry trees, that’s what I’m saying. That’s the “one weird trick.”

Gotcha!

All right, here you go, here’s a genuine cherry tree during late January in the 415:

Cherries will be blooming soon enough.

Until then, enjoy eating plum blossoms, as this Wild Parrot of Telegraph Hill did near the Financial one winter long ago:

Photos from Asian Art Museum’s “In the Moment: Japanese Art from the Larry Ellison Collection” – Opens June 2013

Thursday, September 20th, 2012

Here’s the big news from Kenneth Baker yesterday.

More deets:

“Called “In the Moment: Japanese Art from the Larry Ellison Collection,” the exhibit will include works by noted artists of the Momoyama (1573—1615) and Edo (1615—1868) periods along a 13th—14th century wooden sculpture of Shotoku Taishi; six-panel folding screens dating to the 17th century by Kano Sansetsu; and 18th century paintings by acclaimed masters Maruyama Okyo and Ito Jakuchu.”

This should be an excellent show.

All photos courtesy of the Asian Art Museum:

Shotoku Taishi as an Infant, Unknown, Kamakura period (1249-1335). Wood with polychromy. Larry Ellison Collection

Tigers (detail), 1779. By Maruyama Okyo (Japanese, 1733-1795). One of a pair of hanging scrolls; ink and light colors on paper. Larry Ellison Collection.

Auspicious Pine, Bamboo, Plum, Crane and Turtles, Edo period (1615-1868),ca. 1630-1650. By Kano Sansetsu (Japanese, 1590-1651,By Sansetsu, Kano 1590-1651. One of a pair of six panel folding screens. Ink and colors on gold. Larry Ellison Collection

Oh, and don’t forget about Korean Culture Day this Sunday, September 23, 2012. It’s free!

“IN THE MOMENT: JAPANESE ART FROM THE LARRY ELLISON COLLECTION
Asian Art Museum debuts Ellison’s Japanese art collection, coinciding with 2013 America’s Cup

SAN FRANCISCO, September 20, 2012—Next summer, as the America’s Cup Challenger Series takes to San Francisco Bay, the Asian Art Museum will feature an exhibition of Japanese art from the rarely seen collection of Larry Ellison, Oracle CEO and owner of ORACLE TEAM USA, defender of the 2013 America’s Cup.

In the Moment: Japanese Art from the Larry Ellison Collection will introduce approximately 80 exceptional artworks spanning 1,300 years. The exhibition explores the dynamic nature of art selection and display in traditional Japanese settings, where artworks are often temporarily presented in response to a special occasion or to reflect the change of seasons. In the Moment also considers Mr. Ellison’s active involvement in displaying art in his Japanese-style home, shedding light on his appreciation for Japan’s art and culture.

Included in the exhibition are significant works by noted artists of the Momoyama (1573–1615) and Edo (1615–1868) periods along with other important examples of religious art, lacquer, woodwork, and metalwork. Highlights include a 13th–14th century wooden sculpture of Shotoku Taishi; six-panel folding screens dating to the 17th century by Kano Sansetsu; and 18th century paintings by acclaimed masters Maruyama Okyo and Ito Jakuchu.

“This exhibition offers a rare glimpse of an extraordinary collection,” said Jay Xu, director of the Asian Art Museum. “We aim to present it in a fresh and original way that explores traditional Japanese principles governing the relationship of art to our surroundings and social relationships.”

The exhibition is organized by the Asian Art Museum and curated by Dr. Laura Allen, the museum’s curator of Japanese art, and Melissa Rinne, associate curator of Japanese art, in consultation with Mr. Ellison’s curator, Dr. Emily Sano.

The exhibition is on view June 28, 2013 through September 22, 2013. The Asian Art Museum will serve as the only venue for the exhibition.

For more information visit: www.asianart.org

Remembering the Good Old Days When It was Legal for Tourists to Feed the Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill

Thursday, September 13th, 2012

Back in the day down there betwixt San Francisco’s Financial District and the Golden Gateway Apartments, tourists would come along and just hold their hands out, with astonishing results.

Wild parrots looking for a handout – via Gwen in a great capture from 2007, before The Law

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Ah mem’ries;

First it was all like this (Yes, this is the view you’ll get of the 415′s famous wild parrots from our Filbert Steps.)

The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill

But now it’s all like this. (Gee, should I get a Chinese character inked on my Europid skin and be a laughingstock for the rest of my life or should I get something cool like this instead? Mmmm, decisions, decisions…)

Wow! That’s a good one, Deanna Wardin of Tattoo Boogaloo.

That’s the best tattoo I’ve seen in the 415.

The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill were made famous a few years back by the movie with the same name. Get the new Special Two-Disc Collector’s Edition today, why don’t you?

A friendly pair in the Presidio. Click to expand:

They love to fly

and eat flowers.

Look to the Skies for Signs and Wonders…

Here’s the Reason Why the Cherry Blossoms You’re Seeing in the Late Winter of 2012 are NOT a Sign of Global Warming

Thursday, February 2nd, 2012

So, yes, January is a very early time to see cherry trees start to blossom but what you’re actually seeing are plum trees.

Now both kinds of trees are pretty much the same thing, so no biggee, but plums come out earlier than cherries – global warming doesn’t have anything to do with that.

Oh, here’s what they look like, rather a bit more pink than cherry, in my experience.

Near Clay and Davis, Financial District:

And here’s a nice shot from Flickr:

Via Son/Jon

The Wild Parrots of San Francisco’s Telegraph Hill, From Far Away and From Nearby

Tuesday, December 20th, 2011

Believe it or not, this is a color photograph of the Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill.

A view from the Financial from a few days back:

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But leave us remember more colorful San Francisco scenes…

First it was all like this (Yes, this is the view you’ll get of the 415′s famous wild parrots from our Filbert Steps.)

The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill – Click to expand

But now it’s all like this. (Gee, should I get a Chinese character inked on my Europid skin and be a laughingstock for the rest of my life or should I get something cool like this instead? Mmmm, decisions, decisions…)

Wow! That’s a good one, Deanna Wardin of Tattoo Boogaloo.

[UPDATE: OMG, OMG, it's their One Year Anniversary on July 30th, 2011 - Joyeux anniversaire, Tattoo du Boogaloo! All the deets.]

That’s the best tattoo I’ve seen in the 415.

Ever more deets, after the jump

(more…)

The Best Tattoo in Town: A Flock of Cherry Headed Conures – The Wild Parrots of San Francisco from Tattoo Boogaloo

Friday, July 15th, 2011

[UPDATE: OMG, OMG, it's their One Year Anniversary on July 30th, 2011 - Joyeux anniversaire, Tattoo du Boogaloo! All the deets.]

First it was all like this (Yes, this is the view you’ll get of the 415′s famous wild parrots from our Filbert Steps.)

The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill – Click to expand

But now it’s all like this. (Gee, should I get a Chinese character inked on my Europid skin and be a laughingstock for the rest of my life or should I get something cool like this instead? Mmmm, decisions, decisions…)

Wow! That’s a good one, Deanna Wardin of Tattoo Boogaloo.

That’s the best tattoo I’ve seen in the 415.

The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill were made famous a few years back by the movie with the same name. Get the new Special Two-Disc Collector’s Edition today, why don’t you?

A friendly pair in the Presidio. Click to expand:

They love to fly

and eat flowers.

Look to the skies…

Finally! It’s March, So Now Francisco’s Plum Trees Actually Look Like Plum Trees, Instead of Cherry

Thursday, March 10th, 2011

See?

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My campaign to get area residents to call plum trees “plum trees” is picking up steam. Now, remember back in aught-eight, when some people called mountain lions “cougars?” Good times,* right? Well, those days are history. And, similarly, tout le 415 will be calling cherry trees “cherry trees” by January 2014 at the latest.

You’ll see.

*”Cougar corners St. Mary’s Hoopster in Danville” – that kind of thing.

A Sure Sign That It’s February in the Western Addition: Mercedes Benzes Enrobed with Plum Blossoms

Wednesday, February 23rd, 2011

See?

The NoPA part of the Western Addition in late winter:

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