Posts Tagged ‘point lobos’

Famous Louis’ Restaurant Out Near the Cliff House Reopens on August 3, 2011 – Meet Your Federalized Louis’

Tuesday, July 26th, 2011

From SF FYI Net comes the news: “Louis’ is reopening on Wednesday, August 3, 2011!!!

Check it:

“Got my card in the mail…YAY!!! Just went to your new website and read through everything…great job!!! I love all the “Green” changes you have made…can’t wait to have a cage-free bacon and cheese omelet with some organic coffee!!!!! See you soon…..”

Mmmmm… cage-free bacon.

Anyway, that means that worksite BMXing will soon be a memory:

An excellent capture from dendowling

All the deets:

The Richmond District Blog

“Louis’ Restaurant is going green and organic…”

Inside the Outside Lands

“Keeping Louis’ Alive…”

SF Chronicle

“The family that has run a beloved old-style diner will get to keep it…”

“Louis’ Restaurant is saved…”

“Louis’ serves up eggs, hashbrowns, and a view on the side…”

“Drama is unfolding at Louis’ Restaurant…”

“Can’t imagine the area without Louis’… it’s been my favorite since I was a kid…”

“Family must bid for diner after 73 years…”

 San Francisco Examiner

“Saving San Francisco, one link at a time…”

SF Weekly Blogs

“The bidding process may be more competitive than landing Louis’ famous corner booth…”

“Sutro Heights Diner Trys to Stay Alive…”

Fog City Foodie

The wait staff is super friendly and went out of their way to make us comfortable…”

And here’s what I mean by federalized. Some of this stuff costs money, some of it saves money, some of it’s “whenever possible” – more what you call guidelines than actual rules. We’ll have to wait and see how this might affect prices.

“Louis’ Restaurant’s Efforts To Be Green & Healthy

We at Louis’ Restaurant know that it is important to reduce, reuse, and recycle.  We also believe it is our responsibility to provide our guests with healthy food options.  The following are ways in which Louis’ Restaurant is working towards these goals:

Our Menu
With our yearly usage of over 150,000 eggs, we are now using only cage free eggs that are produced within 100 miles.  Our produce is now certified organic and sourced from within 200 miles, whenever possible.  All our meat and poultry are all natural, hormone and antibiotic free, vegetarian fed, and humanely raised.  All bread & desserts are sourced within 25 miles. Our coffee is certified organic and certified fair trade.

Our Waste Management
We have diverted our solid waste by 75% through recycling and composting.  Our takeout containers are made of compostable materials, and we have changed the way we serve our coffee creamer and butter to further reduce our waste.  We have discontinued selling plastic bottles, instead offering a bottle made of compostable material.  Our used cooking oil is picked up by Got Grease, a small local company that makes biodiesel fuel from the old oil, their major client is the San Francisco Municipal Railway.

Our Renovation
We have installed new tile floors in our dining room made with 55% recycled content.  We have reused our tabletops and booth and counter seats by recovering them.  We changed all lighting to LED bulbs in our dining room and storage areas and all new appliances are Energy Star rated wherever possible in order to reduce our energy consumption.  Our toilet and faucets are all low flow.  We have installed a new high efficiency hand dryer in the restroom that will reduce use of paper towels. The bamboo wainscot in our dining room is Forest Stewardship Certified (FSC) and is a renewable resource.  The roof at the addition has a reflective Energy Star qualified surface.  All interior paint is zero VOC.  Insulation is made from denim and contains no formaldehyde.  Our bathroom and alley doors were reclaimed as was the lumber used to build our emergency exit walkway.  We also used all FSC certified framing lumber to construct the East Elevation Addition.”

Bon Courage, nouveau Louis’!

Akit’s Complaint Department Pwns the SFMTA Once Again – Why Does MUNI Strand Riders Out on 48th?

Tuesday, January 18th, 2011

Famous Akit has been riding the SFMTA over the whole Point Lobos Saturday service issue – check out his update.

(If MUNI ran the post office, a first-class stamp would cost $17. And delivery to Hawaii and Alaska? Well you could just forget about that.)

Remember, Transit First, Riders Last.

The Reason Why Arguello Isn’t Called First Avenue, Plus Bloggish Snark from a Century Ago, Plus NIMBYs!

Monday, September 13th, 2010

Arguello Boulevard used to be called 1st Avenue, back in the day. (That makes sense since it’s right next to 2nd Avenue.) The story of how it got its name changed to honor José Darío Argüello a century ago can be found in the SF History Encyclopedia.

Check it, there was an official San Francisco street renaming commission with a sweeping proposal:

“The scheme called for First Avenue to become Arguello, Second Avenue to become Borcia, Third Avenue to become Coronado, continuing for all 26 letters of the alphabet. Starting with Twenty-seventh Avenue, the streets would be designated by male or female saints, starting with San Antonio and ending with Santa Ynez at Forty-Seventh Avenue. Unable to find Spanish saints with names beginning with K, Q, W, X or Z, they chose first Alcatraz, then Ayala for Forty-eighth Avenue and La Playa for Forty-ninth Avenue.”

See? So when you talk about your favorite new restaurant on the 200-block of Clement, just tell your friends the joint is between Borcia and Coronado – they’ll love it.

This cartoon from the ‘Xam certainly is irreverent, borderline snarky:

And The Embarcadero used to be called East Street?

“Lost! Lost in barbarous Mexico”

But the renaming scheme ran into a little blowback from racist NIMBY landed gentry residents and insular neighborhood associations, much as it would today.

“The neighborhood newspaper, The Richmond Banner, editorialized on November 19: “If the wishes of the twelve of our “patriotic” supervisors are carried out, our Sunset and Richmond districts will soon be known as the Spanish Town of San Francisco, and ‘The Spanish will then have taken San Francisco’ notwithstanding Dewey’s victory at Manila Bay several years ago.” The editorial contrasted the twelve who voted for the name changes against the five “true Americans” who resisted the proposal to “Spaniardize” the districts. “The people of Sunset and Richmond are fully aroused and will never submit to the insult and injustice heaped upon them by the majority of the Board of Supervisors.” In closing, the editor pledged, “Sunset and Richmond districts will stand together and fight this miserable surrender of American names to a finish.”

O.K. then.

But, as you probably already know, everything got worked out in a Grand Compromise:

“Bowing to the pressure, the Commission agreed that the avenues could remain unchanged except for First Avenue and Forty-ninth Avenueand the alphabetical cross-streets would be the only other western district streets to be renamed, except for the Geary Street extension. The name of Point Lobos was removed from most of the Richmond, but would be given to the curving road that extended from Fortieth Avenue to the Cliff House.”

And here’s the conclusion:

“The street naming of 1909 started with the noblest of motives. It soon took on the atmosphere of a farcical comic opera. The outraged citizenry made exaggerated claims rife with bombastic racism, nationalism and religious partisanship.”

Same As It Ever Was