Posts Tagged ‘police’

Board of Supervisors President London Breed Introducing Legislation for Homicide Tip Reward Fund – Up To $250K

Tuesday, October 6th, 2015

Just released:

“At today’s Board of Supervisor’s meeting, Board President London Breed will introduce a drafting request for legislation creating a permanent city Reward Fund to pay up to $250,000 to those who provide information leading to an arrest and conviction in an unsolved murder case in San Francisco.

President Breed released the following statement:

“In the past six years, San Francisco has averaged about 50 homicides per year. Each one is a tragedy. Each one is a lost son, sister, father, or friend. Each one never should have happened. And each one deserves our every effort to bring justice.

We are, according to most metrics, the wealthiest big city in the country. And with that wealth comes some obligations. As the Bible says: ‘From everyone who has been given much, much will be demanded.’ When it comes to the worst crimes our city faces, we should put our wealth to use—both to help the families of victims and get the most violent offenders off the streets.

The city has at times offered rewards in specific cases. But it’s done on an ad hoc basis, and there’s no established fund or consistent process. This can lead to the perception that some cases are more important than others, which they are not.

I am proposing a permanent city fund to provide rewards of up to $250,000 to anyone who brings information that leads to an arrest and conviction in an unsolved murder case. The legislation will establish specific criteria, because in many cases our police department solves cases without the need for a reward.

So the fund should be limited to homicide cases that have gone unsolved for one year, in which the police have exhausted all investigative leads, and for which the Chief of Police has, in his or her discretion, determined that public assistance and a reward is necessary. The Reward Fund should be subject to annual appropriations with money from previous years carrying forward.

All in all, this will require a small amount of taxpayer money, because—thankfully—we’re talking about a small number of cases. But in those cases, we should be doing everything we can. And in those cases,
this reward can make a world of difference.

San Francisco actually already has one such witness reward fund. It’s in Section 640 of the Police Code, and it deals with cases of people pulling false fire alarms. If we can do it for fire alarms, surely we can—and should—do it for unsolved murders.”

Look Who’s Patrolling Masonic for 25 MPH+ Speeders Now: It’s the UCSF Police Squad

Tuesday, September 29th, 2015

One assumes the car was headed up to UC’s Laurel Heights propertah via Masonic, and since you’re here anyway, might as well issue a few citations along the way:

7J7C6654 copy

Pacific Place Apts of Daly City, As Seen from Frisco – A Giant Birthday Cake – The Bridge of a Battleship

Thursday, September 24th, 2015

Boy, this view is somewhat jarring:

7J7C2868 copy

They call this thing a “turret?”

7J7C2871 copy

I don’t know.

7J7C2872 copy

(Two words, Man: Omega Man.)

All the deets

The Anatomy of the Great SFPD SENIOR CITIZEN FACILITY Speed Trap on Fulton

Friday, September 11th, 2015

Here it is, looking west at around 37th Avenue:

7J7C3581 copy

And here’s what you should be looking at – the aging SFPD SUV with radar on the left, the 30 MPH speed limit sign in the middle, and the SPEED LIMIT 25 MPH / SENIOR CITIZEN FACILITY signs on the right:

7J7C3581a copy

Read all about it here, courtesy of a disgruntled Prius driver what got a ticket last year, when the speed limit zones on this stretch of Fulton went 35-25-35. As you can see, these days it goes 30-25-30, but the concept’s the same.

One would think SFGov would want to put in a few more traffic signals in this area, but one would be wrong.

Anyway, here’s the perspective from inside a police car via Stanley Roberts of People Behaving Badly fame: Fulton 500 Speedway.

It Takes A Village (of SFPD Officers) to Make San Francisco’s Mayor Brave Enough to Walk About the Twitterloin

Wednesday, September 9th, 2015

Hidden away around the corner on Market, ready to pounce on whatever needs pouncing upon, and beating upon, you know, if necessary. Otherwise, Mr. Mayor is free to wander about, footloose and fancy-free. As seen a couple years back, during one of the Twitterloin’s many, many recent renaissances

7J7C0202 copy

Classic Photo from Market Street: Shoplifter, Image of Shirtless Abercrombie & Fitch Model, SFPD Officer

Wednesday, September 2nd, 2015

7J7C0703 copy

Yelplash! – 100s Upon 100s of One-Star Yelp Reviews for Napa Valley Wine Train – Also, “NAPA VALLEY RAILROAD POLICE!?”

Tuesday, August 25th, 2015

This post is two posts…

twins (1)

…two posts in one!

So the reason why the Napa Valley Wine Train people just caved so quickly and completely is that they needed to stop the massive bleeding pronto.

I’ll tell you, the Regular Yelp reviews for la Vallee de Napa Train de Vin are bad enough these days, but it’s Secret Yelp, well, it’s OOC – it just goes on and on


Moving on, to this – it was the “Napa Valley Railroad Police(!)” busted / escorted off the premises these women?

WTF to that.

Let’s take a look at their FAQ:

“Are Napa Valley Railroad Police Officers “real cops?

Yes.  Every one of our peace officers is a fully empowered police officer under the authority of section 830.33(e) of the California Penal Code.  Our officers have peace officer authority 24 hours a day anywhere in the State of California the same as any city police officer our county deputy sheriff.  Our primary jurisdiction extends to in and around property of the Napa Valley Railroad.

 Can Napa Valley Railroad Police Officers write traffic tickets?

Yes.  Our officers can enforce all of the laws of the State of California including all sections of the California Vehicle Code.  Enforcement is an essential component of carrying out our public safety mission.  We focus our attention on violations related to the railroad.

 Why does the Railroad need its own police department?  Is there that much crime?

The Napa Valley Railroad Company operates its own police department with the intention of limiting its reliance on public resources.  The Napa Valley Wine Train carries up to 350 people at a time on one train.  The railroad line includes over 90 public and private crossings that run over and alongside Highway 29.  Our mission includes protecting the patrons, employees, and assets of the railroad.  We believe that our presences is the most effective deterrent to crime.”

This FAQ only leads to more questions.

So, the Napa Valley Wine Train operates its own police department!? Who the fuck authorized this?

And what’s next, the Cliff House Restaurant Police? The Ronald McDonald Police Squad?

I’m baffled.

Anyway, chew on that.

The Wine Police, they live inside of my head
The Wine Police, they come to me in my bed
The Wine Police, they’re coming to arrest me, oh, no

Exploring Alternatives to the Crowded, Problematic “The Wiggle” Bike Route – “RIDE OAK?” – Sure, or McAllister

Friday, August 14th, 2015

Here you go:

Due to police harassment on the SF Wiggle we have no choice but to ride Oak.”


Well, let’s see, there are LOTS of reasons to not ride the vaunted THE WIGGLE route and also, there are other options asides from OAK.

But let’s consider Oak now. Oh, here’s famous fixie-riding Andy on the left side of Oak, from all the way back in aught-seven.


And look, the dashed lines made a sort of bike lane on the left side – good times. (Unfortunately, this space for bikes is no longer there, due to subsequent restriping.)

Anywho, going straight on Oak instead of taking the Wiggle at Scott is nice because you’ve only got one sort of steep block. I see people take Oak all the time. Oak is good. Oak is fast. Oak is congested a lot of the time due to horrible horrible Octavia Boulevard (what was dreamed up by wealthy homeowners in Hayes Valley), so you’d spend some time weaving about, getting around drivers trying to get on the I-80 / the 101 superslabs, but that’s OK. I’ll add that Oak is for the adventurous, certainly.

So, Oak is far from being a ridiculous choice, a choice TO TEACH US ALL A LESSON about the dangers of the SFPD handing out citations. It’s a viable option.

Or what of Oak and Baker to Fulton to Divisadero to Mcallister to Market? This is THE UNWIGGLE with no wiggling at all betwixt Divis and Market. And look, you’ve defeated the rich people of HV who put a 105 foot wide BOULEVARD betwixt you and your destination, ’cause Octavia is but a nothingburger walking path / federal housing project parking lot on this route – it won’t slow you down at all.

Or Fulton? It’s a bit hillier than McAll and you’ve got big old City Hall in your way, but it’ll do.

Or Golden Gate? That works too.

Or Haight all the way to Fillmore, just to avoid the congested THE WIGGLE?

Notice that all these routes avoid “cycling” a bunch of people through the stop signs at WALLER and STEINER in the Lower Haight.

Those are some of your inbound routes.

As far as using Fell to go back home, well that’s CRAZY TOWN, that’s ill-advised. I rarely have seen that, in all my years.

IMO, the best way to get back is MCALLISTER


…of course, there are other non-THE WIGGLE choices as well.

But feel free to do whatever you want, commiserate with this knucklehead, who lacks self-awareness, as you both deal with $238 tickets from John Law.

Just saying…

The Back of a Brand-New SFPD Police Car Doesn’t Look Too Comfy – Economy-Class Legroom – Hard Plastic Seats

Thursday, August 6th, 2015

Is there a Ford in your Future?

Let’s hope it’s not this one:

P1290280 copy