Posts Tagged ‘police’

SFPD SWAT OTJ 94117 – Putting the Military Back Into Paramilitary – Armalite AR-15s and Heaven’s Gate Nikes

Tuesday, March 31st, 2015

From a distance, they kind of look like ninja.

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A Post-Racial Arrest Scene, Market Street

Thursday, March 26th, 2015

Arguably

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You know, arguably.

Not a large sample, of course.

Stolen Bike Bazaar Moves Across Market – Generally, These Criminals Hang Out Around Second Street

Thursday, March 19th, 2015

Parts is parts, North of the Slot this time

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On It Goes…

Looks Like They’re Done Working on Fell and Masonic – How Long Will “DOUBLE RIGHT TURN” Last?

Wednesday, March 18th, 2015

This was yesterday morning, with the crew packing up, after weeks of work:

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And this was yesterday evening – it looks like they’re done?

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So what’s the deal here? Are they going to pull up the tape on the intersection what forces cars in the right lane to turn right and then lay down some permanent lines, or are they going to go back to the way it was before, back when you had the option of going straight or right?

Maybe that’s what the orange on the signs means, that these changes were only temporary? Or maybe the orange means, “Hey look, here is the new rule?”

I can’t tell.

But if all they were doing was fixing up that corner of the intersection, then what did they do? It looks exactly the same to me. And why did it take weeks?

On It Goes…

SFPD Announces Opiate Overdose Prevention Program: Officers from Central, Southern, Mission, Northern & Tenderloin Stations to Carry Naloxone

Thursday, March 12th, 2015

Narcan is popular these days, that’s for sure.

I wonder if Park Station will get some at some point…

SFPD Announces Opiate Overdose Prevention Program

The San Francisco Police Department, in partnership with the San Francisco Department of Public Health (SFDPH), will distribute naloxone (trade name: Narcan) to Metro Division police officers (Central, Southern, Mission, Northern and Tenderloin Police Stations) as part of a pilot program to combat drug overdose. Naloxone is an emergency antidote that reverses the effects of opioid-type drugs, including heroin and prescription painkillers. Drug overdose is the most common cause of accidental death nationwide. In San Francisco, prescription opioid painkiller deaths have outpaced heroin-related deaths and continue to be a major threat to public health. The San Francisco Police Department joins hundreds of police departments and community groups nationwide in this worthy effort to prevent drug overdose deaths.

Over the past few months, the San Francisco Police Department teamed with the Harm Reduction Coalition’s Drug Overdose Prevention and Education (DOPE) project, funded by the San Francisco Department of Public Health, and the San Francisco Fire Department to train police officers in how to recognize life-threatening opioid overdose, and administer the intranasal naloxone as an antidote.

We are in the business of saving lives. Naloxone will help us accomplish our mission.”

I Know the UCSF Police CAN Patrol Ashbury Street for Traffic Violations, But I Don’t Know WHY It Does So

Thursday, March 12th, 2015

There are some answers here, but this activity waaaaay off-campus still seems off-mission to me:

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Mobile Stolen Bicycle Chop Shop at Second and Market Street in the Financh? That’s Pretty Brazen

Thursday, March 12th, 2015

Parts is parts, one supposes:

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Dirt Bike vs. Dirtbags: The SFPD OTJ in the Golden Gate Park Panhandle

Tuesday, March 3rd, 2015

Well, actually, I don’t know what these people did to earn a citation from the SFPD and I don’t what else they’ve done lately, you know, that might have escaped notice of the popo:

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So maybe they’re not* dirtbags IRL, IDK.

Perhaps I’ll get called for jury duty on one of these citations, and then I’ll let you know.

*The SFPD bait car program straight outta Hollywood was a bad idea, for example. I can’t imagine convicting anybody for moving an unlocked car left idling and double-parked on Divisadero, for example.

Here’s What Bus Drivers, Bike Riders, and Pedestrians Think of the New DOUBLE RIGHT TURN at Fell and Masonic

Friday, February 27th, 2015

This MUNI operator used to be able to pick up at Hayes and Masonic southbound and then easily continue straight on Masonic towards Haight. But now #43 Masonic drivers need to get into the #2 lane as the #3 lane is now a mandatory right turn onto Fell. So click click goes the left turn signal as the bus driver begs the stalled traffic for a little help:

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And if you’re coming from inbound Hayes to southbound Masonic on a bike, you now have two lanes to jink across if you wish to continue on along Masonic:

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This is why some, including those at the SFMTA/SFBC disfavor DOUBLE RIGHT TURNS. Note also the driver who’s improperly cutting across from lane #3 to lane #2.

And of course, now more drivers are blocking the box / sitting on the crosswalk:

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On it goes at Fell and Masonic.

Someday I’ll figure out what the SFMTA is going for here.

Someday.

Uh Oh, the SFPD’s Vaunted “Focus on the Five” Enforcement Program Focuses on the Wrong Five

Tuesday, February 24th, 2015

Work with me here, people.

Here you go:

“Focus on the Five – Using multi-year collision data, the San Francisco Police Department (SFPD) is focusing on enforcing the five violations that are most frequently cited in collisions with people walking. The goal is to have half their traffic citations be for these five violations.”

All right, well let’s look at the stats for last year, via Heather Knight / the District 5 Diary.

And then let’s extract all the five-digit CVC section numbers cited in the official SFPD report, plus let’s also throw in a CVC number for the pedestrian who died last year after getting hit by a MUNI bus on Geary around Baker.

(And let’s ignore all the the lower-case subsections like 21950(b) and the like, treating 21950(a) and 21950(b) as the same violation, for example.)

And then lets throw all the extracted numbers into Excel for a Sorting.

And then let’s eyeball the numbers to separate them out:

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So those are your top “five violations that are most frequently cited in collisions with people walking (and bicycle riding, but I don’t think that affects the numbers too much.)

Here they are, in order of frequency:

21950

22350

21456

21954

21955

So how does that compare with this list from politicians?

“Focus on the 23 Five” campaign to target the top five causal factors of pedestrian crashes – running red lights 24 (California Vehicle Code 21453(a)), running stop signs (California Vehicle Code 22450(a)), violating pedestrian right-of-way (California Vehicle Code 21950(a)), failing to yield while 2 turning (California Vehicle Code 21801 (a), and speeding (California Vehicle Code 22350)…

See how that works? 21950 and 22350 are in there, but CVC violations on the part of pedestrians, like 21456, 21954, and 21955 have been omitted from the list.

Is the official “Focus on the Five” about pedestrian safety or “pedestrian rights?”

I’m thinking it’s about pedestrian rights, like the right to jaywalk, that kind of thing.

Is SFGov serious about SF Vision Zero 2024, a “program” that has the goal of ending all transportation deaths in San Francisco long after all the pols who voted for it have termed out?

Well, how can it be if it’s afraid to enforce traffic laws for political reasons?

If you want safety for pedestrians, wouldn’t you want them to be afraid of getting cited for jaywalking?

No? All right, well then keep on doing what you’re doing, but you’ll never ever achieve Vision Zero 2024 the way you’re going about it, SFGov.