Posts Tagged ‘pop up’

San Francisco 2024 Olympics Roundup: Reaction to Today’s Big Push in the Pages of the SF Chronicle

Thursday, November 20th, 2014

Well, today’s the big day for the bid to have the 2024 Olympics in the Bay Area.

San Francisco puts in chips for 2024 Olympics by John Coté

1. Obviously, an Olympics in the bay area would be good news for the San Francisco Chronicle. Obvs. I mean, that goes without saying, right? See the editorial below. I mean, they learned us this in Economics, case studies of media support for Olympics past.

2. What’s this?

“We have a lot of reverence for the Olympics … but there may be some ways to modernize the Games or do it a little differently,” said Giants President and CEO Larry Baer…

Sounds like Larry’s been looking at opinion polls. You know, Lare-Bear, the other option is to simply let authoritarian regimes host them from now on.

3. Gee, I really think “improvements” should be in quote marks here:

“Plenty of uncertainty remains, however, including whether improvements to housing, transportation and other infrastructure are worth the cost of hosting the Games.”

4. Is this right, our we still in the first inning?

Baer acknowledges that their effort is still in “the first inning,” even after a months-long exploratory process that included meeting with U.S. Olympic officials in July.

I’d say we’re in the seventh inning stretch. This contest will be all over in a month or two. After that, the only question will be whether America gets the Games in 2024.  This “first inning” stuff is spin spin spin.

5. Here’s the start of some nice OTOH grafs:

“It looks more and more like a boondoggle,” said Andrew Zimbalist, economics professor at Smith College in Massachusetts and author of the upcoming book “Circus Maximus: The Economic Gamble Behind Hosting the Olympics and World Cup.” “It’s a very difficult calculus to make work for you,” Zimbalist said. “The modern Olympics costs billions and billions of dollars to host. The recent evidence we have is that it does not increase tourism, even during the Games.”

6. But this part here is false:

Private funding from international corporate sponsorships, ticket sales and local sponsorships would cover operating costs that Baer projected at about $4.5 billion.

How does John Cote know that operating costs will be covered? He doesn’t.

7. And what a coincidence that our budget and Boston’s are exactly the same! Who’s cribbing from whom?

Boston has a similar cost projection of $4.5 billion for hosting the 2024 Games, a number Zimbalist dismissed as “a nonsense figure.” “They don’t know what they’re talking about,” Zimbalist said.

This is a nice, strong statement. One would expect the cost overage to run from something like 200% to 500% – something in that territory.

8. Uh, the America’s Cup was a “boon” to which industries?

Last year’s America’s Cup was a boon to certain businesses but…” 

I can’t think of a one, honestly. A “boon,” really?

9. Here we go:

Olympic bid leaders aren’t touting the Games’ economic benefits, but rather the ability to rally a region around tackling some of its major problems — transportation and housing — while improving San Francisco’s marginalized southeast corner.

So, if we want to help black people in the southeast, why don’t we simply give them the $4.5 billion and be done with things?

10. And here’s your stinger:

“Olympians,” said Cribbs, “are just ordinary people who do extraordinary things.”

 Sometimes, I suppose. Other times, it’s like this:

Moving on… to this:

OPINION – Solid start to Bay Area bid for 2024 Olympic Games – San Francisco Chronicle

11. Whoo boy:

At the top of the list is a pledge that they will not be asking for any direct public subsidies in what is expected to become a $4.5 billion venture if San Francisco were to become the first U.S. city to host the Summer Games since Atlanta in 1996.

Didn’t we just through this with the America’s Cup? Who’s pledging that there will be no public subsidies? This is laughable.

12. Whoo boy redux:

“We’re trying to take all the lessons learned, not just from other Olympics but what we learned from America’s Cup,” said San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee, adding, “We’re going to be smart about it.”

This is what everybody says every two years. What makes 2024 different?

13. Whoo boy redux II, Electric Boogaloo:

This region’s diversity, appeal as an international destination and leadership in technological innovation would make it a perfect fit for an Olympic Games — as long as it’s done our way, with sensibility and sustainability. The framework of this fledgling bid is very encouraging

The Olympics in the Bay Area would be good for some and not good for others. The Chronicle says we should do things “our” way, but we’re following the well-worn path of countless others. Any “sensible” Olympics proposal from the bay area would get rejected by the IOC, so that option’s not really on the table, now is it?

And here comes CW Nevius, a bit off-message:

Bay Area’s Olympic dreams focused on landfill near Candlestick by C.W. Nevius

14. Ah, Nevius. Let’s watch him beg for access right here on Twitter. A bit unseemly, IMO. And then he goes on about the weather / climate. That’s the least of our problems, right?

15. Remember that stuff from Larry Baer up above about us being in “the first inning?” Forget all that:

It could work, but it would need buy-in — and soon 

I’m not sure why the Neve is so negatory on Brisbane. I think it could “work” as well as any other location.

Anyway, for some reason, the boosters picked today to have a Big Push in the Chronicle.

We’ll see how it goes.

Onward They Charge:

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Marin Headlands Mystery Machine: Sleep All Day, Party All Night – It’s Fun Being a Vampire

Thursday, November 13th, 2014

Wait for it…

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Wait for it…

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Oh, there it is. Boy, this is a little ballsy, huh?

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I don’t think the authoritahs could miss this parking job…

Icebreaker, That Upscale Merino Wool Designer Where Orlando Bloom Buys His Underwear, Opens in San Francisco

Saturday, November 26th, 2011

[UPDATE – Here’s the official spiel:

“Icebreaker makes Outdoor, Running, Cycling, Travel, Kids, Underwear and Lifestyle apparel from handpicked merino wool born in the Southern Alps of New Zealand. It’s non-itch, easy to wash, lightweight, versatile, easily packable and no-stink (because merino is naturally anti-mircrobrial, you can wear it for days ow weeks without a wash).

Sustainability has been part of Icebreaker’s ethos since the start. It has strict animal welfare and farm standards, and has a traceability program (called “Baacode”) that enables people to use a unique code sewn inside their garment to trace the fiber back to the sheep stations that grew it all the way through its supply chain.”

And OMG, it’s “Ramotaur” and “Nature Girl” on the streets of SF:

Click to expand

And one last thing:

Ramotar will be appearing next weekend Friday, Saturday, Sunday, 12/2-12/4, 12pm-3pm, fliers in key SF locales, Union Square, Embarcadero, Ferry Building, etc. Also Friday and Saturday, 12/9-12/10, 12pm-3pm in the same locales.

O.K. then.]

So Icebreaker is that fashionable merino wool store from New Zealand where actor Orlando Bloom goes shopping for woolens

sometimes along with his gf, model Miranda Kerr:

Well guess what, this was the week that Icebreaker opened its first “TouchLab” store in Northern California. It’s down at 170 Post in Union Square.

See?

OMG, is that a wool chandelier?

All right, find out about the landlord, Grosvenor Americas, after the jump.

See you there!

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OMG, It’s the “Icebreaker” Pop-Up Store from New Zealand! Get “Merino Wool Adventure Apparel” Starting Nov. 21 in Union Square

Wednesday, November 9th, 2011

I know some people who have been just waiting for this kind of thing from Icebreaker, that fashion dahling of the Hahvard Business Review.

Best of all, each piece of clothing comes with its own Baacode, so ewe can trace your purchase back to the Southern Alps of New Zealand.

All the deets here, and below.

Who’ll win this one? She has the reach but his posture tells you he wants it more:

Click to expand

“Icebreaker Brings a Touch of New Zealand to the Heart of San Francisco - New Zealand merino wool apparel company’s first San Francisco store will launch November 21, prior to the grand opening of a full build-out in March 2012

Wellington, New Zealand (7 November 2011) – Icebreaker, the New Zealand company that pioneered the merino wool adventure apparel category, today announced it would “break the ice” in San Francisco with the opening of a retail store in San Francisco on November 21, 2011, just in time for the holidays. The Icebreaker store will be located at 170 Post Street, between Grant and Kearny Streets, just one block from Union Square.

San Franciscans will be in introduced to Icebreaker in two phases. The 1600 square foot location’s initial iteration will feature the complete Icebreaker line, showcasing its Outdoor, Running, Cycling, Travel, Kids, Underwear and City collections, all made from handpicked merino wool born in the Southern Alps of New Zealand.

In March 2012 the space will be fully built-out as a “TouchLab” store. A TouchLab store enables shoppers to touch Icebreaker raw merino fiber, as well as the various weights of apparel Icebreaker makes, and experience the pleasure of pure, soft, breathable merino, which offers instant warmth, coolness in the summer, is sun safe and antimicrobial and can be machine washed.

“People in San Francisco love the outdoors and have a great appreciation for nature and natural products, so this area is the perfect location for our newest TouchLab,” said Jeremy Moon, Icebreaker’s founder and CEO. “San Franciscans are our ideal customer: savvy shoppers who appreciate apparel that looks as fantastic as it performs.

“Icebreaker is perfect for the Bay Area climate. Merino wool performs beautifully anywhere, be it on the slopes of Tahoe, during a bike ride through Wine Country or on a summer evening in the city.”
Natural, sustainably produced Icebreaker merino regulates body temperature in all climates, is highly breathable to prevent the clamminess associated with synthetics, and protects wearers from the sun’s harmful rays. It’s also no stink, resisting odour and wearable for days – sometimes weeks – without washing.

Icebreaker opened its flagship TouchLab store in New York City in December 2010 and also has TouchLab stores on the West Coast in Portland, Oregon (home of its US headquarters) and Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. It also has a TouchLab in Montréal, Canada. The Icebreaker San Francisco pop-up store will be open Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m.- 8p.m., and Sundays, 11 a.m.-7 p.m., (415) 399-9615.

“New Zealand’s merinos produce a wool that has a very fine diameter, which makes it soft and breathable yet with high insulation value for warmth.”
– TIME magazine

“The thin construction leverages wool’s breathability and natural wicking properties, so you don’t suffocate when a run heats up.”
– Runner’s World

“It wicks like a champ and is as comfortable as cotton.”
– Backpacker magazine

Icebreaker Clothing
Launched in 1994, Icebreaker was the first company in the world to develop a merino fibre layering system for the outdoors. It was also the first outdoor apparel company in the world to source merino directly from growers, a system it began in 1997. The Icebreaker apparel system includes underwear, mid layer garments, outerwear, socks and accessories. There are outdoor, technical and lifestyle categories, each with its own specific fabrics and design details. Icebreaker is sold in more than 3000 stores in 43 countries.Based in Wellington, New Zealand, Icebreaker uses only pure merino handpicked from 140 high country stations in the country’s Southern Alps to create adventure clothing for women, men and kids that combines nature’s work with human technology and design. The company is committed to sustainability, ethical manufacturing and animal welfare. In 2008 the company launched “Icebreaker Baacode,” a pioneering supply chain transparency and traceability program. Each Icebreaker includes a unique Baacode, which enables customers to trace the garment online from rearing the sheep through to each stage of the supply chain process.”

OMG, It’s Photographer’s Heaven: A Pop-Up Shrine to Adobe PhotoShop! PhotoWalks, Workshops, Classes – Ends August 6

Wednesday, July 27th, 2011

Have you heard about the two-week Photoshop & You pop-up event at 550 Sutter in Union Square?

OMG, you gotta get over there and check it out.

“Adobe has a new retail venture: a two-week pop-up location. Think of it as a hybrid exhibition, gallery, classroom, experimental lab, retail store and creative experience designed to immerse the public in the visual world of digital imaging. It’s part art, part tech – and all free.”

All the deets:

- Free to the public (including all workshops, classes and photowalks)
– Open until Saturday, August 6
– Hours of operation:
    Sun–Wed: 11 a.m.–7 p.m.
    Thurs–Sat: 11 a.m.–9 p.m.
– Photos of the space: http://on.fb.me/oBT1kl

Now I think you’re too late for the big Adobe Chinatown Photowalk on July 31 (don’t go there without an invite, and I’ll tell you, you can’t get an invite at this late date) but there’s other stuff going on.

Check it:

And check out the schedule – there’s a lot of stuff:

See you there!

Desperate Union Street Landlords Open to Any Offers – Rise of the “Pop Up Stores”

Wednesday, November 4th, 2009

Oh, Union Street, will you ever win? You’re chock-a-block full of meddlesome NIMBYs, hard-partying post-collegiates and empty storefronts. Oh well.

But there’s hope for the commercial landlords - it’s called the pop up shop. Why not allow a tenant to open up for a month or two for a few bucks? That’s better than the no bucks you’ve been making recently during the Great Recession. It’s POP UP RETAIL, BABY!

So, from this, right next to the Crepes a Go Go

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to this:

popupshop copy

OMG, it’s the Sikara & Co. Jewelry Pop-Up Store! It just opened, but don’t fall in love with it – it’s closing next month.

(And for you non pop-up retailers, it’s super easy to renegotiate your rent these days. Those landlords are taking any offer, any offer at all.)

Anyway, here are the deets:

Sikara & Co. Jewelry Pop-Up Store Opens on Union Street

Sikara & Co., an internationally inspired modern fusion jewelry company makes Union Street in San Francisco its new home as a “pop-up” shop.

The pop-up style store front is one of the newest trends to emerge in retail.  “This style of store front allows us to open a temporary store in San Francisco and market test our collections as we roll them out nationally; we are very excited to be one of the first pop-up stores in the city,” said Mousumi Shaw, Founder and Creative Director.

They go on and on - see you after the jump!

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