Posts Tagged ‘Princess Cruises’

San Francisco Crows About Becoming the First City in California to Allow Docked Cruise Ships to Use “Shoreside Power”

Wednesday, October 6th, 2010

Take that, Ports of Redwood City, Richmond, Oakland, Long Beach, L.A. and Fun Diego!

Read below for all the deets.

Now, the military, well, it might be a while afore the U.S. Navy gets aboard the whole shore-side power movement. Like, when the USS Bunker Hill visited not too long ago, power for the vessel came 100% from an internal Westinghouse geared steam turbine. Chugga chugga chugga on through the night, powering some of the 250 X-Boxes on board. Oh well.

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Anyway, all the deets of today’s news:

MAYOR NEWSOM AND THE PORT OF SAN FRANCISCO INAUGURATE CRUISE SHIP USING SHORESIDE POWER - San Francisco is first California city where cruise ships can plug in for clean power

San Francisco, CA— Mayor Gavin Newsom and the Port of San Francisco today joined Princess Cruises and state and federal agency partners to officially inaugurate shoreside power at Pier 27, allowing Island Princess to shut down her engines and receive clean power from the City’s electrical grid.  The Port of San Francisco became the first California port, and one of only a handful of ports in the world, to provide shoreside electrical power for cruise ships while at berth.

“Once again we are demonstrating that doing right by the environment doesn’t come at the expense of jobs and economic growth,” said Mayor Newsom. “With shoreside power, we can welcome a growing number of cruise ships and the tourist dollars they bring to San Francisco while protecting the Bay and our local air quality.”

Shoreside power results in zero air emissions while a ship is connected in port. This new system is not only the first in the state, but just the fourth in the world. The other cruise ports with shoreside power are Juneau (Alaska), Seattle (Washington), and Vancouver (Canada). The ports of Los Angeles and San Diego also plan to implement this system.

Island Princess is operated by Princess Cruises, who developed the shore power technology in Juneau in 2001. It expanded to Seattle in 2005 and Vancouver in 2009. Currently nine of the line’s ships are outfitted to plug into a shoreside power source.

Ever more deets, after the jump.

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See the Sea Princess in Drydock at Pier 70 Tonight on the National Geographic Channel

Thursday, June 3rd, 2010

Remember back in the day, when San Francisco was a blue collar town? Well, dude, S.F. is still a blue collar town, if only because of BAE Systems and all the stuff they do with ships on the east si-iiiide.

Remember the 70-yard band-aid that was slapped on the Cosco Busan at Pier 70 a few years back? This will show the same kind of deal – tonight you’ll be able to see all the deets of the work of our highly-paid blue-collar types. You’ll be able to see the Sea Princess, inside and out.

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Enjoy:

Sea Princess Stars in National Geographic Channel’s Hit Series ‘World’s Toughest Fixes’

June 3 Episode to Take Viewers Behind the Scenes During Princess Cruises Ship’s Drydock

SANTA CLARITA, Calif., June 1  — The immense job of drydocking Sea Princess will be featured in the June 3 episode of National Geographic Channel’s (NGC) top-rated show, World’s Toughest Fixes.  TV viewers can go behind the scenes as host Sean Riley follows the entire process from the time the Princess Cruises ship enters the drydock to the final sea trials.

Airing on Thursday, June 3 at 9 p.m. ET/PT on NGC, the show was filmed while Sea Princess was in a regularly scheduled drydock at BAE Systems San Francisco Ship Repair last September.  The episode focuses on the enormous task of completing a multitude of drydock projects in just 15 days, with emphasis on several technical “fixes” on the bottom of the ship that could only be accessed when the ship is out of the water.

“This is a unique opportunity for audiences to really appreciate the amazing around-the-clock effort needed to keep our ships in top shape to deliver the experience our passengers expect,” said Jan Swartz, Princess Cruises executive vice president.  “We’re excited that the National Geographic Channel was interested in featuring this rare behind-the-scenes project.”

One of the network’s most popular shows, World’s Toughest Fixes takes viewers inside some of the most daunting repair jobs with Riley, a professional master rigger, as he works with many of the world’s top mechanics to show how they tackle these challenging fixes. World’s Toughest Fixes airs Thursdays at 9 p.m. ET/PT on NGC.

Riley joins the Sea Princess drydock crew on a number of tasks, adding his own elbow grease and expertise along the way and tries out several drydock jobs.  He helps strip and power wash the hull, tries his hand at upholstery work and joins the team working high up on the ship to seal the windows.  He even gives viewers an up-close view inside the tail shaft housing as he crawls in to show the audience the work being done.

Throughout the episode viewers will get a glimpse of the buzz of activity on a ship in drydock, including a look at installation of carpet and floors, the stripping of wooden decks, and even a glimpse of the ship’s new adults-only Sanctuary which was constructed during the drydock.

More photos of last fall’s Sea Princess drydock are available in the Sea Princess Drydock Journal.  Behind-the-scenes photos of the World’s Toughest Fixes crew at work during the shoot are available on the Princess Flickr photostream.

Additional information about Princess Cruises is available through a professional travel agent, by calling 1-800-PRINCESS, or by visiting the company’s website at www.princess.com.

 Princess can also be found on:
 Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/PrincessCruises
 Twitter: http://twitter.com/PrincessCruises
 Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/princesscruises