Posts Tagged ‘prison’

The Q! – How Any Monkey Can Use Photoshop on This Shot of San Quentin – The Miracle of the Healing Brush Tool

Wednesday, October 29th, 2014

I’ll tell you, I know every street, alley and pathway of northern San Francisco and southern Marin, you know, like the back me hand, Matey. But this part of Marin, near San Quentin Prison, I don’t know that well, so I figured I’d take a shot and then later on ID those peaks on the ridge and also that massive-looking apartment-looking building on the right there. (Or is it a hospital? IDK, maybe. I think I’ve been there, actually. It sure is tall for Marin County…)

Anywho, here’s the shot – note those light poles with direct sunlight on them.

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I’ll bet the Spot Healing Brush Tool could clear things up in a jiffy. You just drag your mouse over the stuff you want gone and poof, it’s gone. Photoshop simply guesses at what it thinks is there IRL. It’s like magic, no skillz required:

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Is this acceptable? Well, sure. It depends on what you’re using a shot for. I don’t think this thing would fly with the San Francisco Chronicle, but for an ad or something, sure.

Just don’t release two versions of the same shot, ala Kent State, and you should be fine.

Probably.

Iconic Bay Area: Alcatraz, The Slot, Mount Tamalpais

Thursday, June 26th, 2014

West Peak, Middle Peak, and the East Peak of Mount Tam in Marin County, all above a very good place to look for wind and fog and general cloudiness:

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American Hustle, Shanghai Surprise: If You Conspire to Spy for China, the FBI Will Make a Movie About You: “Game of Pawns”

Tuesday, April 15th, 2014

This is the tale of  Glenn Duffie Shriver, badly told:

Thanks, FBI.

I guess.

Wow, a Big Part of the New 8 Octavia Building Looks Like It’s a Prison

Friday, March 28th, 2014

As seen from Market Street:

Everybody in Khakis! A Different Kind of Bus Tour Group in San Francisco’s Civic Center

Thursday, November 29th, 2012

I was thinking like California Conservation Corps but the bus they rode in on had federal plates.

Who are these people?

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This is a stumper.

Anyway, they’re probably not from The Gap.

Prison Realignment Starts Tomorrow, October 1, 2011

Friday, September 30th, 2011

Rina Palta of KALW News has a  bit on prison realignment this morning. (That’s just the kind of thing you can find at THE INFORMANT: Cops, Courts, and Communities in the Bay Area.)

And here’s some related information about parolees from candidate for Sheriff Ross Mirkarimi, below.

Welcome back:

“October 1: State transfers parolees to San Francisco’s probation programs and jails - The City braces for influx of ex-offenders starting Saturday

SAN FRANCISCO — On Saturday, October 1, the first group of state prison parolees scheduled for transfer to San Francisco will begin arriving in the City under Realignment — legislation signed by Gov. Jerry Brown on April 4, 2011.

The City has created a comprehensive program to shift ex-offenders to local control, including increasing electronic monitoring, social and rehabilitation programs, and preparing for an increased jail population.

Some details on the parolees and program:
· Expected number of new parolees in 2011-2012: 700
· Average age of transferred parolee: 39
· Average number of prior convictions: 7
· Time in which parolees have to report to the City after release: 48 hours
· Crimes: Non-serious, nonviolent and non-sexual offenses
· Transportation for parolees: City will transport most; some travel by bus

Questions remain:
· Recidivism: How will the City’s new parolee population impact jails?
· Funding: State funding is short of City needs and only budgeted for nine months. How will programs be sustained?
· Impact on City agencies: How will law enforcement, social and health services be affected by the increased ex-offender population?

Supervisor Mirkarimi, Chair of the Board of Supervisors’ Public Safety Committee, convened hearings on Realignment and sponsored several ordinances to address the ex-offender transfer.”

Please Note: San Quentin Prison is a “TOBACCO FREE ENVIRONMENT”

Tuesday, February 8th, 2011

‘Cause you wouldn’t want anybody dying in there prematurely or anything…

Main Gate, on the day Snoop Doggy Dog dropped by for a rally:

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(Note to self – Marin County has yellowjackets, apparently.)

PBS to Air “Presumed Guilty” July 27th – Two UC Berkeley Students Explore Mexican Justice System

Monday, July 26th, 2010

This is what’s coming up on KQED-TV tomorrow at 10:30 PM: a documentary from UC Berkeley Goldman School of Public Policy doctoral candidates Roberto Hernández and Layda Negrete.

Tune into Channel 9.  All the deets, below

Congratulations to Roberto and Layda.

BERKELEY — On Tuesday, July 27, the PBS POV documentary series will air “Presumed Guilty”, a riveting examination of the Mexican judicial system created by UC Berkeley Goldman School of Public Policy doctoral candidates Roberto Hernández and Layda Negrete. In the Bay Area, the film will air at 10:30 p.m. on KQED.

Hernández and Negrete, both attorneys, document their struggle to free a wrongfully imprisoned man and to expose a Mexican criminal justice system that imprisons thousands of other innocent people like him.

PBS says this about the documentary: “Imagine being picked up off the street, told you have committed a murder you know nothing about and then finding yourself sentenced to 20 years in jail. In December 2005 this happened to Tono Zuniga in Mexico Cityand, like thousands of other innocent people, he was wrongfully imprisoned. ‘Presumed Guilty’ is the story of two young lawyers and their struggle to free Zuniga. With no background in film, Roberto Hernández and Layda Negrete set about recording the injustices they were witnessing, enlisting acclaimed director Geoffrey Smith (“The English Surgeon”) to tell this dramatic story.”

Jerry Brown Strikes Back Against California Prison Receivership

Wednesday, January 28th, 2009

Attorney General Jerry Brown today filed a motion filed today in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California urging the court to exterminate with extreme prejudice the state’s pri$on receiver$hip.

Read all about it in the Motion to Terminate. Too difficult to get through? Well then, how about “Plush Hospitals for State’s Felons” from purported “gossip” columnists Matier and Ross instead?

In a nutshell:

“The Receiver’s $8 billion plan calls for adding 7 new prison health care facilities containing 10,000 new beds for prisoners — that’s 7 million square feet, or the size of 70 new Walmarts. The plan would also renovate space at each of the 33 existing state prisons. A draft of the plan also includes yoga rooms, horticultural therapy, extensive landscaping to obscure prison fences, music and art therapy, regulation basketball courts, quiet rooms, an emphasis on natural light and high ceilings, and a so-called “treatment mall.” A subsequent draft contains most of the same features without the graphic detail.”

On it goes…

Brown Calls on Court to Terminate Prison Receivership

SACRAMENTO – Attorney General Edmund G. Brown Jr. today called on the federal district court to terminate an “unaccountable prison receivership” and its extravagant $8 billion prison construction plan because both violate federal law.

“The court should terminate this unaccountable prison receivership and its $8 billion construction plan, restoring a dose of fiscal reality to the provision of inmate medical care in California,” Attorney General Brown said. “The federal receivership has turned into its own autonomous government operating outside the normal checks and balances of state and federal law,” Brown added.

The Receiver’s $8 billion plan calls for adding 7 new prison health care facilities containing 10,000 new beds for prisoners — that’s 7 million square feet, or the size of 70 new Walmarts. The plan would also renovate space at each of the 33 existing state prisons.

A draft of the plan also includes yoga rooms, horticultural therapy, extensive landscaping to obscure prison fences, music and art therapy, regulation basketball courts, quiet rooms, an emphasis on natural light and high ceilings, and a so-called “treatment mall.” A subsequent draft contains most of the same features without the graphic detail.

The construction of new facilities, as well as the upgrading of existing facilities, is estimated to cost $8 billion. In addition, it will cost $1.7 billion to $2.3 billion per year to operate these facilities. The projected operations cost per inmate is $170,000 to $230,000 per year. This extravagant plan comes at a time when California is facing a fiscal catastrophe and funding for school children is being slashed.

The Termination Motion
In a motion filed today in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, the Attorney General urged the court to terminate the Receivership and his plan for the construction of prison healthcare facilities – because the Prison Litigation Reform Act prohibits judges from ordering the construction of state prison facilities and limits court-imposed remedies to the “least intrusive” possible.

In place of the $8 billion plan, the Attorney General called for returning the prison health care system to the State and the appointment of an interim Special Master to conduct hearings and make proposed findings of fact.

Background
California is under Federal court order to provide health care that is not “deliberately indifferent” to the health needs of prisoners. The State of California is committed to providing such care.

The State – under the receivership – has taken significant steps to improve inmate health care. California has increased health care staffing and filled almost 90 percent of open physician positions, improved emergency response, professional standards, contracting systems, and health care screenings.

In total, California has increased per inmate health care spending from $7,601 per year in 2005-2006 to $13,778 in 2007-2008. By comparison, spending per inmate in federal prisons will be $4,413 per inmate in 2008-2009. The average cost of health care coverage for a single person in California in 2008 was $4,906.

Nevertheless, the Receiver continues to insist on a massive program that would lead to the construction of facilities and amenities that go well-beyond standards required by the Constitution and federal law. The Prison Litigation Reform Act, signed into law in 1996, forbids judges from ordering construction of state prison facilities, and requires that any plan that a court orders be “narrowly drawn, extend “no further than necessary” to correct the violation of the Federal right, and be the “least intrusive means necessary.” (18 U.S.C. § 3626(a)(1)(A))

On August 25, 2008, the Receiver filed a motion to hold the Governor and other State officials in contempt for failing to turn over to the Receiver $8 billion for his construction plans, and the district court ordered the state to make a down-payment of $250 million by November 5.

Subsequently, Brown appealed that decision to the Ninth Circuit, which stayed the district court order. The Ninth Circuit will hear oral argument in the case on February 12, 2009.

Jerry Brown Demands Details on Huge $8 Billion Prison Plan

Monday, December 8th, 2008

Attorney General Jerry Brown thinks California should get a peek at how a court-appointed overseer plans to spend eight billion dollars to improve health care in the prison system.

If public money is being spent,” Brown said, “the public has the right to know how it’s going to be spent.”

That sounds fair enough. Get his side of the story here:

Attorney General Brown Urges Reversal of Decision Forcing California to Make $250 million “Down-Payment” for Massive Prison Plan.

Our feisty AG:

via “Thomas Hawk’s” Photostream

Or just read the whole brief that was filed today and then decide for yourself here. Well, that’s a bit much to read, but here’s the crux:

“The State of California has acknowledged the need to provide constitutionally adequate healthcare. The state, however, argues that the Receiver has not complied with the Prison Litigation Reform Act, which requires that any prison remediation plan that a court orders “is narrowly drawn, extends no further than necessary to correct the violation of the Federal right, and is the least intrusive means necessary to correct the violation of the Federal right.” (18 U.S.C. § 3626(a)(1)(A)).”

Is that so crazy, wanting to see what the plans are before turning over a quarter billion dollar “down payment?”

We’ll see.