Posts Tagged ‘privacy’

Can You Ride MUNI Without Consenting to the Use of Your Image for Any Purpose? YES – Now, What About When You Ride a Ford Motor GoBike?

Tuesday, September 5th, 2017

Hey, seems like you’re investigating Michigan-based Ford Motor Company’s / New Yawk-based Motivate, International’s Privacy Policy? So I’ll point you here:

https://www.fordgobike.com/privacy-policy

But nope, no luck, just a blank webpage:

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CALL: Mmmm, it seems as if FoMoCo’s vaunted public / private partnership might be less than perfect?

RESPONSE: So it would seem.

But let’s move on, to this:

https://assets.fordgobike.com/liability-waiver.html

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My modest proposal would be that Ford / Motivate would simply get permission to use images. You know, like We The Ford People want to put you in one of our ads – would you do that for free, or maybe you’d like to get paid? You know, something like that.

So let’s review – MUNI no, you’re not selling use of your image for free v. FordGoBike yes, you have already consented to let them use photos and videos of you on a Ford GoBike so you can’t sue them, and, AAMOF, you might not be able to sue them anyway owing to some other rights you have unwittingly signed away.

Who could have prevented this sitch? Our money-hungry SFMTA und MTC.

So, it would seem that our SFMTA and MTC has been co-opted by all those tens of millions of sweet sweet Ford Dollars.

FGBOTD: Your Ford GoBike of the Day – Impression, Sunrise – Submerged in the Briny Deep of Lake Merritt

Sunday, August 13th, 2017

Yet another quite wet Ford GoBikevia Ruth Miller, no filter:

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La mise-en-scene:

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Hey, why don’t we try taking off the FORD logo from all these bikes if this is how the reaction is?

(And why doesn’t Ford PAY people for the data it gathers, if it values this data so so much?)

Question: Does Citibank track “bikeshare” rental users in New Yawk the way Ford is now doing in the Bay Area? Non. Non non non! ‘Cause Ford is getting more data. Now, why is that? (Hey, did our local government officials make a bad deal?) Anyway, that’s something to consider.

I mean, if you install FordPass to rent a bike for 30 minutes, what happens next and for the rest of the life of your smartphone?

Oh, look:

Information We Collect. We collect the following types of information through your use of FordPass or third-party services that integrate with FordPass, such as Ford GoBike, which we also may combine with other information you have previously provided, or that we have collected from other sources:

Information you provide to create an account or sign-in to an existing account, such as name, email address, street address, telephone number, credit card, and Vehicle Identification Number (VIN). You must have an account to use FordPass.

Information we collect through FordPass includes:

Location information collected from your mobile device and/or vehicle, such as Global Positioning System (GPS) and location derived from IP address, which can be used to determine your device or vehicle’s current location, travel direction, and speed.

Mobile Device Information, such as software or operating system version, unique device identifiers, IP address, mobile network information, and mobile phone number.

Vehicle Information, such as the VIN, hardware model and part numbers, status of vehicle systems (e.g., fluid levels, tire pressure, and locks), vehicle diagnostics, odometer, and other information about how the vehicle is performing.

Driving Characteristics, such as speed, use of accelerator, brakes, steering, seat belts, and other similar information about how the vehicle is used.

Information about how you use FordPass or third-party services that integrate with FordPass, such as when and for how long you use features and when you contact us, a record of your communication.

FordPass may also contain online tracking technologies (e.g. Adobe Analytics and Aptelligent) on your mobile device that collect non-personal information about how FordPass is used and how it is performing including if it crashes, and which may be able to be connected across devices and over time. These technologies cannot be deactivated in FordPass and do not respond to “Do-Not-Track” requests.

How We Use Information We Collect: We use your personal information – information that reasonably identifies you – to provide you with great functionality and services, allow you to control certain vehicle features, fulfill requests you’ve made in FordPass, personalize your experience, troubleshoot problems, develop new and improved products, services, and marketing strategies and research, to protect safety, property, privacy, and security, or to comply with legal requirements. WE MAY send communications about products, services, offers, promotions, news, and more that are customized based on your personal information, including your location, speed, and driving characteristics. You may choose not to provide certain personal information (such as not entering a VIN to connect to your vehicle or not entering a credit card to use My Wallet services), but this may limit or prevent use of certain features. We may use and share non-personal information for any purpose.”

Is this a fair deal?

[UPDATE: Oh, I guess it got fished out today around 3:00 PM – who knows, maybe it’s back in service already.]

The San Francisco Bicycle Coalition Wants Its Members to Vote Away Members’ Voting Rights? – A Rebellion

Wednesday, July 22nd, 2015

The Vote is On at our San Francisco Bicycle Coalition. Let’s take a look:

Why is the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition updating its bylaws?

“In response to concerns from our members, the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition’s Board of Directors proposed an update to our bylaws that bolsters members’ privacy.”

Bolster member privacy? How are you going to do that?

“…the only effective way to properly respond to members’ privacy concerns is to provide members a chance to vote on eliminating the member-elected Board structure in our bylaws, and instead elect future Board members by a vote of sitting Board members. This would relieve the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition of the legal obligation to turn over our membership list referenced above.

Oh, so you want the Members to vote to take away the Memberses’ right to vote? Are you fucking serious?

(I’ll tell you, I don’t care all that much ’cause I, like most longtime cyclists in the 415, am NOT a member. And, you know, even with the Members’ existing rights, there was nothing to stop the board from endorsing Ed Lee for Mayor back in 2011, as it did, even though a fair polling of SFBC membership would NOT have yielded such a crass endor$ement, but oh well.)

Comes now Save the SF Bike Coalition to ask:

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Here’s the peanut gallery:

“I personally suspect the mass mailing was used as a pretext. SFBC’s new Executive Director, Noah Budnick, comes from Transportation Alternatives in New York City, which has a governance structure similar to what SFBC seeks in this by-law change.”

So Members, I don’t care if you vote away your voting rights, but the legal arguments forwarded by the SFBC on this topic are absurd.

Simply absurd.

The Drone Bros of Golden Gate Park: Whose Drone is Hovering Three Feet from Your Bathroom Window on Fell Street? This Dude’s

Tuesday, May 26th, 2015

Here’s the scene without any arrows pointing things out:

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And here are the arrows:

7J7C8569a copy

And here are the bros:

7J7C8569 copy

Now it could be that bro was just checking out his own pad using his new toy, but man, some people might have been surprised if they saw this drone hovering just outside their windows.

The drone slowly increased altitude to rooftop level and I didn’t stick around to see where it went next.

This is How We Live in 2015…

Google Seeks the “Right Balance” on the Right To Be Forgotten: “Expert Advisory Council” to Hold Meetings in Europe Soon

Friday, July 11th, 2014

The latest from the Google Blog on the so-called Right To Be Forgotten in the First Amendment-free EU:

Searching for the right balance

[So in five words I’m counting two puns and one subtle jab at the possibility of an absence of balance in this latest unappealable edict handed down from the Court of Justice.]

So here’s the wind-up:

“In May, the Court of Justice of the European Union established a “right to be forgotten.” Today, we published an op-ed by David Drummond, senior vice president of corporate development and chief legal officer, in the U.K.’s The Guardian, Germany’s Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, France’s Le Figaro and Spain’s El Pais, discussing the ruling and our response. We’re republishing the op-ed in full below. -Ed.”

And here’s the pitch – the final two grafs:

“That’s why we’ve also set up an advisory council of experts, the final membership of which we’re announcing today. These external experts from the worlds of academia, the media, data protection, civil society and the tech sector are serving as independent advisors to Google. The council will be asking for evidence and recommendations from different groups, and will hold public meetings this autumn across Europe to examine these issues more deeply. Its public report will include recommendations for particularly difficult removal requests (like criminal convictions); thoughts on the implications of the court’s decision for European Internet users, news publishers, search engines and others; and procedural steps that could improve accountability and transparency for websites and citizens.”

“The issues here at stake are important and difficult, but we’re committed to complying with the court’s decision. Indeed it’s hard not to empathize with some of the requests we’ve seen—from the man who asked that we not show a news article saying he had been questioned in connection with a crime (he’s able to demonstrate that he was never charged) to the mother who requested that we remove news articles for her daughter’s name as she had been the victim of abuse. It’s a complex issue, with no easy answers. So a robust debate is both welcome and necessary, as, on this issue at least, no search engine has an instant or perfect answer.”

“Posted by David Drummond, Senior Vice President, Corporate Development and Chief Legal Officer

Well played, G!

The “Selfie Stick” Arrives in San Francisco – These Tourists Use One to Take Better Photos in Golden Gate Park

Friday, June 27th, 2014

See?

Click to expand

Well, I know it’s a selfie stick because I seen them using it. In this shot above they are simply reviewing their results.

Actually, I heard about the “selfie stick backlash” afore I ever saw one. We’re moving through Kashmir Hill territory here, from June 2014:

“That is un-f***ing believable,” he said. My Hong Kong friend was surprised by our surprise. “It’s a selfie stick,” she explained. “They’re all over Asia.”

Oh, here’s one, and there are others.

In closing, selfie stick – it’s a thing!

Or, if you’d prefer, Selfie-Stick Fever – Catch It!

Oh let the sun beat down upon my selfie-stick, stars to fill my dream 
I am a traveler of both time and space, to be where I have been 
To pose for selfies with the gentle race, this world has seldom seen 
They talked for days of my new iPhone 6, and all will be revealed 

San Francisco-Based Strava Introduces New Data Service “to Support Better Bicycling Worldwide”

Wednesday, May 7th, 2014

Here’s the latest:

“Strava Introduces New Data Service to Support Better Bicycling Worldwide

Strava Metro Provides Detailed Insight into Local Cycling Activity

SAN FRANCISCO, May 7, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — Strava, the online network connecting the global community of athletes, has announced Strava Metro, a new service that allows insight and analysis of bicycling routes and commute patterns around the world. The service empowers advocacy organizations and government agencies to understand cycling activity in local communities and make better-informed decisions when planning, maintaining, and upgrading bicycling infrastructure.

http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnvar/20140507/85541

Strava Metro leverages the activity uploads of millions of Strava members worldwide, anonymized and aggregated to protect privacy, to bring the process of collecting cycling traffic data into the digital age. With more than 2.5 million new GPS-tracked activities added each week, Strava’s data set of over 300 billion GPS points offers an entirely new way of understanding and analyzing cycling traffic at a local level.

“Bicycling safety is a top concern to our members worldwide, especially when they’re riding through metropolitan areas with a high concentration of motor vehicle traffic,” said Michael Horvath, co-founder and president at Strava. “Strava Metro delivers an innovative way for us to serve Strava members and non-members alike by helping to make their daily commutes and weekend rides smoother and safer.”

Organizations in the following areas are currently analyzing data from Strava Metro including the Oregon Department of Transportation and the cities of Alpine Shire, Australia; Arlington, Va.; Glasgow, Scotland; London, England and Orlando, Fla.

“Our goal is to provide a safe, efficient transportation system in Oregon which includes sustainable transportation options such as bicycling, walking and taking public transit,” said Margi Bradway, active transportation policy lead at Oregon Department of Transportation. “Strava Metro data will help us understand how and where cyclists are riding in Oregon, a critical component to evaluating the transportation system and planning for the future.”

Strava Metro is available today. Advocacy organizations and the general public can access high-resolution heatmap visualizations of the data free of charge. Organizations seeking deeper insight and analysis will be able to license Strava Metro data sets for use with geographic information systems (GIS) mapping software. Pricing is based on the number of Strava members in the requested geographic area. To learn more about Strava Metro visitmetro.strava.com.

About Strava
Strava is the online network that connects the global community of athletes. Founded in 2009, millions of athletes have joined Strava for the competition and camaraderie found in tracking and sharing their fitness activities. The company’s free mobile apps and website help members discover and plan workouts, record and share activities, and analyze and compare performance. Strava’s ability to connect athletes around the world makes fitness a more social experience, providing extra motivation even when training alone. www.strava.com

For more information, contact:
Michael Oldenburg
press@strava.com

Photo – http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140507/85541

SOURCE  Strava

Photo:http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140507/85541
http://photoarchive.ap.org/
Strava

Web Site: http://www.strava.com

Groove on Trippy Presidio Terrace, As Seen by Google Maps

Friday, July 19th, 2013

Google is now careful about revealing too much about tony Presidio Terrace, as it’s a private street.

Google didn’t know that back in 2007.

Check here and here.

Good times:

It might look like a public street but it’s not, so the people that live on this small loop just north of Clement are free to hire a guard to keep out whomever they want. And not too long ago, the houses here all had restrictive covenants that prevented people of the “non Caucasian race” from buying or leasing on this street. An ad from the latter part of 1906:There is only one spot in San Francisco where only Caucasians are permitted to buy or lease real estate or where they may reside. That place is Presidio Terrace.”

But now Google does know, so no Street Maps for you – it’s terra incogniter. See?

It looks like Instagram or something.

Anyway, the data from the Google Maps Car visit of 2006 is gone.

Long gone.

And the residents like things that way, I suppose.

Does CA Really Need a “Social Media Privacy Act?” No Matter, SB 1349, the Job Interview Facebook Password Law, is Here

Friday, May 25th, 2012

Uhhhhhhhhhhh, I’m not going to articulate myself on this one.

But you, you go right ahead, feel free to tell your buds what you think. (But first, please email me your FB account names / passwords, and your intimate photos and whatnot.)

All right, off you go:

“California Senate Approves Social Media Privacy Act – Yee’s SB 1349 will prohibit employers, colleges from seeking Facebook, Twitter passwords

SACRAMENTO – On a bipartisan 28-5 vote, the California Senate today approved legislation authored by Senator Leland Yee (D-San Francisco/San Mateo) to stop employers from formally requesting or demanding employees or job applicants provide their social media usernames and passwords.

Yee’s bill also prohibits public and private colleges and universities from requiring such information of students.

The bill comes after a growing number of businesses, public agencies, and colleges around the country are asking job seekers, workers, and students for their Facebook and Twitter account information.

“I am pleased by today’s overwhelming vote to end this unacceptable invasion of personal privacy,” said Yee. “The practice of employers or colleges demanding social media passwords is entirely unnecessary and completely unrelated to someone’s performance or abilities.”

In addition to the privacy of students and workers, accessing social media accounts may also invade the privacy of family members and friends who thought they only were sharing information with their own social media network.

“These social media outlets are often for the purpose of individuals to share private information – including age, marital status, religion, sexual orientation and personal photos – with their closest friends and family,” said Yee. “This information is illegal for employers and colleges to use in making employment and admission decisions and has absolutely no bearing on a person’s ability to do their job or be successful in the classroom.”

“SB 1349 is a significant step towards securing Californians’ constitutional right to privacy, both online and offline, in the workplace and in school,” said Jon Fox, Consumer Advocate for CALPIRG.

“If employers are permitted to access the private information of job applicants, unscrupulous hiring managers will be given greater leeway to circumvent anti-discrimination laws,” said Joe Ridout of Consumer Action.

Rather than formally requesting passwords and usernames, some employers have demanded applicants and employees to sit down with managers to review their social media content or fully print out their social media pages. SB 1349 will also prohibit this practice.

Shannon Minter, Legal Director for National Center for Lesbian Rights, said that the practice of requesting social media passwords is the equivalent to reading a personal diary, and also LGBT employees, job applicants, and students already face significant obstacles when applying for schools and jobs.

Minter said that SB 1349 helps ensures individuals are “judged by their qualifications and performance, rather than elements of their private life.”

IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law professor Lori Andrews, who specializes in Internet privacy, told the Associated Press that these practices even when given voluntarily should not be allowed.

“Volunteering is coercion if you need a job,” Andrews told the AP.

Johnny Veloz, an unemployed photographer, told KCRA Sacramento that he was asked for his Facebook password during a recent job interview. Veloz was denied the job after refusing to provide the information.

“For me, that’s rude and it’s not respectful,” Veloz told KCRA. “Someone has privacy and you expect them to respect that.”

Yee’s bill would also prohibit employers and colleges from demanding personal email addresses and login information of employees, applicants, and students.

SB 1349 will now be considered by the State Assembly before heading to the Governor.”

And oh, if I ever crafted a “social media privacy act,” I can just about guarantee you that Facebook WOULD NOT LIKE IT. Not one bit.

Just saying.

Michael Krasny’s FORUM show is Covering the BART Shooting Protests Right Now on the KQED-FM

Monday, August 29th, 2011

All right, listen live to KQED’s Michael Krasny right now, 9:30 AM, Monday morning, August 29th, 2011:

Protest or Prank?

Last week, the hacker collective known as Anonymous posted online what they claim are semi-nude photos of BART spokesman Linton Johnson. In light of this very personal attack, we discuss the ethics of hacking. Will public officials now have to live in fear of angering individuals with sophisticated knowledge of computers and technology?”

FTR, Linton Johnson didn’t “decide” to turn off cell phone service. The story is this: Linton was solicited by somebody at BART for ideas, “constitutional or unconstitutional,” on how to deal with that Thursday night shooting protest. Linton had the idea (gee, has BART done anything like this cell phone shutdown before?) but it was approved by higher up(s). Linton wasn’t The Decider, AFAIK.

The news from NMA Taiwan:

Or, you can listen to it later, I’m sure…