Posts Tagged ‘prize’

Who in SF Will Dare to Propose Renaming a Street for Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Liu Xiaobo?

Friday, May 30th, 2014

The news of the day:

China decries call in U.S. to name street after jailed Tiananmen dissident

Boy, it wouldn’t take too much effort from a few members of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors to hop on this particular bandwagon.

Mmmm…

Now, which street to rename?

Hey, how about Laguna, the location of our Chinese Consulate? My, wouldn’t that be “provocative?”

In related news, here’s what a small stretch of Laguna looks like now, right in front of the consulate – see the brand-new NO STOPPING  ANY TIME signs?

They’re also on Geary, so that means the Western Addition has lost maybe ten parking spaces, in the name of security, one supposes.

Actually, I’m surprised that parking lasted as long as it did, as it was such an obvious security issue.

On It Goes…

Do These People Fly UC Berkeley Flags all the Time, Or Only On Days When Cal Wins a Nobel Prize?

Wednesday, October 5th, 2011

I don’t have enough data to make this determination.

As seen yesterday, October 4th, 2011, in the Western Addition – it’s the mansion of patriotic San Franciscans:

Click to expand

Congratulations, Dr. Saul Perlmutter! You now have “worldwide fame and campus parking.”*

All the deets after the jump.

*Don’t let the Streetsblog people find out about the free on-campus parking perk. I’m seriously.

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Did Ford Motor Company Really Come to Justin Herman Plaza to Give Away a $15k Fiesta Yesterday? Yes. Limbo Limbo!

Friday, December 10th, 2010

Living in San Francisco can have its challenges but one nice thing is that corporations (yeah, man, the corporations, man) come to town and start giving stuff away.

As it was yesterday in Justin Herman Plaza, where Ford gave away a car to the best limbo-er who showed up. (I would have told you about it but it was one of those Facebook deals, and it’s hard for me to get info off of the FB sometimes,* so I didn’t know about the deets even though I had a link, oh well.)

Anyway, see footage of the thrilling conclusion of the two finalists right here – it’s a punchy three minutes.

Fiesta Thunderdome: Two limber gals enter, one limber gal wins

Congratulations, winner!

*I sometimes forget my fake name and/or my password. You have to use a totally new password to give to Facebook else that oily Zuckerberg fellow will use it to log on to your Gmail and whatnot to spy on you. That’s how he rolls. I’ll tell you, I outlived the AOL** and I’ll outlive the FB**, you’ll see.

**Beloved by grandmothers and corporations both

Website Name Confusion? “The East Bay Citizen” vs. BANP’s Nascent “The Bay Citizen”

Thursday, April 15th, 2010

Back in the day, back around 1855-1865, the bay area had an actual physical newspaper called the “Daily Citizen” or “San Francisco Daily Citizen” or something. Didn’t last too long.

But these days, the fairly common name Citizen  (it made this list, anyway) is back in bidness in the bay area. Check it – here’s the East Bay Citizen.

See? There’s your straight-up prototypical Citizen Journalism right there, with extensive coverage of sujets civiques in San Leandro and Hayward from highly regarded Steven Tavares. Dude’s even got a manifesto ‘n stuff:

The purpose of The Citizen is to serve the areas of the East Bay that are severely under reported by the local media. The reasons your daily newspaper is sparse devoid of insight or context is either because of financial constraints leading to cutbacks in the newsroom or general dereliction of civic duty (that is the polite way of saying it).”

All right, fair enough.

Comes now the Bay Area  News Project (BANP). See?  It’s backed by more millionaires and billionaires than you can shake a stick at.  Well, next month, they’re going to start up with The Bay Citizen. Here’s their logo:

Question Time. Do you think that there might be confusion between these two outfits, owing to the similarity of the names? I do. Can you imagine how future developments could create even more confusion? Mmmm…

Do you think the person(s) who came up with the name Bay Citizen for the BANP are aware of the online existence of the East Bay Citizen? Yes, of course, how could they not be?

Now, do you think the person(s) who came up with the name Bay Citizen for the BANP bounced the idea off of Steven Tavares beforehand? No, that’s a negatory, good buddy.

And do you think hardworking Steven Tavares is pleased with BANP’s actions? No. (Not saying he’s all pissed off or anything, as he’s manifestly Too Busy To Hate, just saying he’s not pleased.)

All right, Question Time is over. Now, it’s Party Time. Check it:

The Bay Citizen Just got the green light – our launch party will be held at the historic Great American Music Hall in San Francisco on May 26th. It’s a wonderful venue for what we promise will be an amazing party!”

So, for $50 you can score two tickets and then be able to tell all your friends that you’re a “Founder” of the BANP’s Bay Citizen online venture

Party on, I s’pose.

San Francisco’s West Coast Chicken Cooking Contest Coming September 2010. Enter Now

Wednesday, March 31st, 2010

Submit your recipe by June 30th, 2010 and you just might win the First Annual Foster Farms West Coast Chicken Cooking Contest in San Francisco come September. Do it for the lulz but mind the red tape:

“The contest is open to all California, Oregon and Washington residents over the age of 18. Contestants are encouraged to submit their unique chicken recipes featuring fresh Foster Farms chicken and local ingredients, wherever possible. Entries will be judged by members of the food media and culinary professionals. Entries can be submitted online at www.fosterfarms.com/cookingcontest, by e-mail at cookingcontest@fosterfarms.com or by mail to Foster Farms, Cooking Contest, P.O. Box 306, Livingston, CA 95334.”

I know what your thinking, your thinking Chinese Chicken Burgers with Rainbow Sesame Slaw. Well it’s been done already in a recent national contest, so try to think of some unique recipe using degredients from your area. It’s all local these days, right? And a story, you gots to have a cute story to tell the judges while they’re noshing. (Work in something about your grandmother, that’s always a winner.) 

This boid, spotted a while back in front of San Francisco’s historic City Hall building in Civic Center, isn’t eligible ’cause he’s not a smooth, refreshing Foster Farms chicken. Oh well: 

Start cooking. Bon courage!

(And don’t tell PETA. Shhhh….)

Calling All Chicken Chefs: Foster Farms Announces First-Ever West Coast Chicken Cooking Contest. Contest features Grand Prize of $10,000 and one-year supply of fresh Foster Farms chicken

LIVINGSTON, Calif., March 31 — Your favorite chicken recipe could be worth $10,000. Foster Farms today announces the call for entries for its first-ever Foster Farms West Coast Chicken Cooking Contest. The contest’s champion will earn a prize of $10,000 plus a one-year supply of fresh Foster Farms chicken*. The company is carrying on the tradition of the now defunct National Chicken Cooking Contest, the nation’s longest running and most lucrative cooking competition, but bringing it closer to home on the West Coast. Home, amateur and professional chefs residing in California, Oregon and Washington are encouraged to submit their prized, original chicken recipes for consideration. Recipes must feature fresh Foster Farms chicken and should be inspired by local ingredients as a testament to Foster Farms’ commitment to foods that are fresh, locally-grown and always natural. The deadline to enter is June 30, 2010 at 11:59:59 p.m. PDT and the contest will culminate with finals held in San Francisco in September 2010 during National Chicken Month.

All the deets, after the jump

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Bay Area News Project to Go Live May 26th, 2010 – Become a Founder for Just $50

Tuesday, March 30th, 2010

That Bay Area News Project / The Bay Citizen, it looks like they’re opening for bidness with a quickness. And they want your money too – actually, you might find donating a few bucks of seed money rewarding. Take a look.

Here’s the pitch I got today:

“Dear LADIESMAN217,
 
“I know that you’re passionate about local journalism, because you’ve signed up for our newsletter.  Now, you have the chance to do something positive for Bay Area news.  Help us create a vital institution for the Bay Area – become a Founder of The Bay Citizen.
 
“The state of news in the Bay Area is at an all-time low.  Half of the professional journalists covering the Bay Area are gone.  Original reporting about education, public policy, government, science and health, art, and other important civic topics has been hit the hardest.  What important stories are we missing?”

Now hold on, is the state of news in the Bay Area really at an “all-time low?” Really?

I’ll tell you, one of the specific examples cited by BANP Founder (the real Founder, not a run-of-the-mill-$50-donation founder) F. Warren Hellman to show the need for non-profit journalism in the bay area was the category of ballet reviews. Now, I just finished coding the HTML for a brace of reviews for the latest ballet performance in town – check it out here. Do you think this incomplete list is too short? Do you think the quality of writing from all those writers just isn’t there? Mmmmm.

Cheer up newsie, you’ll be repurposed and back in action in a couple months:

Anyway, look forward to the BANP owning the field of arts review soon. I don’t know, maybe ballet reviews in newspapers were somehow better back in the day?

Of course that’s a pretty specific nitpick, I’ll agree. But what about a century ago when Bill Hearst got people all fired up about something based on a bunch of lies ’n stuff? Wasn’t that par for the course back then? I’m thinking things are not at an all time low, myself. Oh well.

You can read the rest of that pitch letter after the jump. Be sure to take note of all the perks of Founderdom:

“As a Founder, you will receive:
Free admission to our launch party for you and a guest.  We’re planning to have the event in San Francisco, and we promise an entertaining evening.
Permanent recognition as a Founder on a special page of our Web site which we will unveil when our site goes live.
An invitiation to help shape The Bay Citizen by participating in our surveys and focus groups.
And of course, the satisfaction of knowing that you are helping to make history by supporting the future of Bay Area journalism.
Founders who donate over $1,000 will also receive an invitation to a small-group lunch with myself and Jonathan Weber, our Editor in Chief.
 

(Tell you what, you give this Citizen $50 and I’ll take you out to Chow, no problem. Now, you might not be able to deduct that from your taxes…)

As promised, the rest of the pitch, after the jump. Maybe you’ll think this offer a good deal.

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BANP Update: San Francisco’s Newest Big Media Outlet is Called The Bay Citizen

Tuesday, March 23rd, 2010

San Francisco’s Bay Area News Project has a new name – it’s now called The Bay Citizen.*

But they’ve still not started yet. Where will BANP rank on the list of world’s longest gestation periods? Somewhere betwixt llama and African elelphant, I’ll bet. Stay tuned.

Oh, here’s some news:

“Renowned Investigative Journalist Steve Fainaru Joins The Bay Citizen

Bon Courage, Steve Fainaru.

*That’s kind of close to San Francisco Citizen**, eh? I Better Call Saul.*** Let’s hope they steer of this blog’s core coverage area of cheerleaders, beauty queens and nude Bay to Breakers participants.

**This name was the only alliterative (starting with an “S” as in Sentinel or a soft “C”) old-school 19th-century San Francisco newspaper name available, so that’s why it got picked.

***One of this blog’s half-dozen readers has already weighed in with this bon mot:

“Just saw the Bay Area News Project renamed themselves to Bay Area Citizen. Boooooooooo!”

Famous San Francisco Writer Herb Caen Finally Opens a Twitter Account

Monday, March 22nd, 2010

Not exactly sure how he managed it, but Herbert Eugene Caen is bringing his brand of three-dot journalism to the Internets via the Twitter.

Not bad for a guy born in 1916, huh?

He’s already developed a following. Good for him…

Enter the San Francisco Ballet Nutcracker Video Contest and WIN WIN WIN!

Tuesday, November 3rd, 2009

From Laughing Squid comes the news - the San Francisco Ballet is holding an interactive video contest in conjunction with its upcoming Nutcracker season, starting December 8th, 2009. They’re asking the public to submit short, original Nutcracker-themed videos for a chance to win some fabulous prizes, including:

a trip for four to Aspen;

a weekend getaway at The Fairmont Hotel;

tickets to SF Ballet performances and more.

What are you waiting for? Get shaking!

What is this ballerina doing in the mail room? Click here to find out.

ballet copy

For more information and full contest details visit www.sfballet.org/contest.

Grand Prize
A six day-five night trip for four to Aspen, Colorado, including flight, deluxe hotel accommodations, rental car, and entertainment. In addition, the grand prize winner will receive a four-pack of tickets to see San Francisco Ballet’s Nutcracker this December, and a commemorative book, San Francisco Ballet at Seventy-Five, filled with stunning images of the Company. (Approximate value of Grand Prize package = $6,710)

Second Prize
A two-night stay at The Fairmont Hotel in San Francisco, with daily breakfast, dinner for two at The Tonga Room, two Center Box seats to a performance of San Francisco Ballet’s Swan Lake in January 2010, including a VIP backstage tour. In addition, the second prize winner will receive a four-pack of tickets to see San Francisco Ballet’s Nutcracker this December, and a commemorative book, San Francisco Ballet at Seventy-Five. (Approximate value of Second Prize package = $2,265)

Third Prize
Dinner for two at Seasons Restaurant, located in the Four Seasons Hotel San Francisco, as well as a $300 gift certificate to Amazon.com. In addition, the third prize winner will receive a four-pack of tickets to see San Francisco Ballet’s Nutcracker this December, and a commemorative book, San Francisco Ballet at Seventy-Five. (Approximate value of Third Prize package = $1,010)

In addition, the two remaining semi-finalists will each receive a four-pack of tickets to see San Francisco Ballet’s Nutcracker this December, as well as the commemorative book San Francisco Ballet at Seventy-Five.

Lights, camera….

Another Nobel Prize for UC San Francisco – Dr. Elizabeth Blackburn Brings Home the Gold

Monday, October 5th, 2009

Here she is, America’s newest Nobel Prize winner: UCSF‘s Elizabeth H. Blackburn, Ph.D:

blackburn_color2_full copy

They’ll be partying hard today down at the Mission Bay campus. The celebration in Genentech Hall starts in just a few minutes and they’ll have a full-blown news conference this afternoon.

Wow! First Oprah and now this.  

Of course Elizabeth wouldn’t want to leave out her co-winners, so let’s give a shout out to Carol W. Greider of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Jack W. Szostak of Harvard Medical School.

blackburn_lab_full copy

It’s going to be on!

Congratulations to Elizabeth and everybody at the University of California, San Francisco

Fiat Lux, baby!

THE DISCOVERY OF THE TELOMERASE ENZYME

The scientists discovered an enzyme that plays a key role in normal cell function, as well as in cell aging and most cancers.  The enzyme is called telomerase and it produces tiny units of DNA that seal off the ends of chromosomes, which contain the body’s genes. These DNA units – named telomeres—protect the integrity of the genes and maintain chromosomal stability and accurate cell division.  They also determine the number of times a cell divides—and thus determine the lifespan of cells.

Telomerase is pronounced (tel-AH-mer-AZE). Telomere is pronounced (TEEL-oh-mere).

The research sparked a whole field of inquiry into the possibility that telomerase could be activated to treat such age-related diseases as blindness, cardiovascular disease and neurodegenerative diseases, and deactivated to treat cancer, in which the enzyme generally is overactive.

In recent years, Blackburn and colleagues have explored the possibility that life stress, the perception of life stress and lifestyle behaviors could take a toll on telomerase and telomeres. They have reported several studies with human participants, suggesting a correlation. The findings may offer insight, at the cellular level, into the impact of stress on early onset of age-related diseases.

The scientists were named to receive the prize “for the discovery of how chromosomes are protected by telomeres and the telomerase enzyme,” according to the Nobel committee in Stockholm, Sweden.

Evolution of discovery

Blackburn’s road to discovery traces back to 1975 to 1977, when she was a postdoctoral fellow at Yale University. There, working with Joseph Gall, she discovered the unusual nature of telomeres, with their simple, repeated DNA sequences comprising chromosome ends. The work was published in 1978.

With Szostak, she established that these DNA repeats stabilize chromosomes inside cells. They also predicted the existence of an enzyme that would add the sequences to the ends of chromosomes.

In 1985, while a professor at University of California, Berkeley, Blackburn and her then-graduate student Greider reported the discovery of such an enzyme, which they named telomerase. Their research showed that in some organisms, such as the single-celled pond dweller Tetrahymena, telomerase continuously replenishes the chromosome’s telomeric tips. In humans, however, researchers, including Blackburn and her group, showed that telomerase is damped down at certain times in the lives of many types of cells, limiting their ability to self-replenish.

With this discovery, scientists saw the possibility of exploring whether, in humans, the enzyme could be reactivated to prolong cell life to treat age-related diseases, and deactivated to interrupt cancers.

Blackburn joined the UCSF faculty in 1990 and is the Morris Herzstein Endowed Chair in Biology and Physiology in the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.

She is the fourth UCSF scientist to win the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.
A native of Australia, Blackburn has lived in the United States since 1975, and is a naturalized citizen of the United States as of September 2003.

She lives in San Francisco with her husband, John Sedat, PhD, a professor of biochemistry and biophysics at UCSF. They have one son, Benjamin.

UCSF is a leading university dedicated to promoting health worldwide through advanced biomedical research, graduate-level education in the life sciences and health professions, and excellence in patient care.