Posts Tagged ‘product’

San Francisco Celebrity Product Endorsement: Frank Chu, the Former Quiznos Man, at the Chevron McDonalds – Market Street

Tuesday, August 20th, 2013

This Micky D’s is in one of the former Chevron Buildings on Market in the Financh / South of Market Area. It even has a fake gas pump inside. (And yet McDonalds promotes Shell these days, go figure.)

Anyway, you can find Frank Chu here like multiple times per day. If that’s not a product endorsement, I don’t know what is.

Click to expand

Back in the day, Quiznos used to pay Frank to have its name on his Famous Sign – you’ll learn about that in colledge, Marketing 101

Toyota to Open “Product Quality Field Office” in the Bay Area by the End of July, 2010

Thursday, July 8th, 2010

I’ll tell you, there’s not a doubt in my mind that Toyota continues to be, by far, the best car company in the world. That’s something that commenters and pundits who don’t know what the eff they’re talking about should keep in mind, one might think. (And rest assured, my giant Toyota has, for some odd reason, both a new-school electronic throttle sensor and old-school throttle cable. It’s like you’re wearing a belt and suspenders at the same time!)

Anywho, due to the recent troubles, Toyota has a new joint coming to the Bay Area. So, look forward to a Product Quality Field Office opening its doors in the East Bay, in San Ramon, soon. (They’re calling it “San Francisco” in the press release, but that’s close enough, I s’pose. It’ll be close to Berkeley, anyway, where 20% of cars sold these days are Priuseses, or something.)

Welcome Toyota!

Bon courage.

All the deets:

Toyota to Expand Product Quality Field Offices Across United States and Canada

San Francisco Field Office Launches This Month; Seven North American Offices Planned Significantly Enhances Field Data Collection and Technical Capabilities

TORRANCE, Calif., July 8  — Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., Inc. (TMS), today announced that it is expanding its Product Quality Field Office program to four additional U.S. regional sales areas, following the success of a pilot program launched in the New York region in late 2009.  TMS will officially open its next Product Quality Field Office in San Francisco this month, and an additional three offices across the U.S. over the next 12 months.  Toyota Canada Inc. (TCI) announced that it will establish Product Quality Field Offices in Toronto and Calgary, for a total of seven offices across North America.

Staffed by technical and engineering specialists with expertise drawn from across Toyota’s global operations, these Product Quality Field Offices strengthen Toyota’s North American field technical presence and data gathering and reporting capabilities, enhancing the company’s ability to detect, analyze and respond to customer and quality issues in the field.

Product Quality Field Offices are being established with the mandate to investigate specific field quality issues related to unique regional, geographical or environmental conditions in each area.  The New York region office was developed to investigate the performance of Toyota, Lexus and Scion vehicles in cold weather climates, with an emphasis on corrosion issues.  The new San Francisco office will focus on hybrid vehicle systems and durability, capitalizing on the high concentration of these vehicles in the California market.

Ever more deets, after the jump.

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Dennis Herrera Throws Down: Demands Proof of Accuracy for Intelligender Pregnancy Test

Wednesday, March 10th, 2010

City Attorney Dennis J. Herrera can’t abide companies that don’t prove their claims. So today he’s going after Intelligender LLC because of its “in-home fetal gender prediction product” that you can get at Walgreens. For the record:

“IntelliGender, the Plano, Texas, creator of the “Boy or Girl Gender Prediction Test,” says scientists isolated certain hormones that when combined with a “proprietary mix of chemicals” react differently if a woman is carrying a boy or a girl. It claims that within 10 minutes of taking the urine test, a woman will be able to tell her baby’s gender. The specimen will turn green if it’s a boy, and orange if it’s a girl.”

The question is about accuracy, primarily.

San Francisco’s Happy Warrior:

As always, follow the action on the Twitter.

Herrera demands proof of accuracy, safety claims by IntelliGender in-home test

City Attorney invokes authority under Unfair Competition Law in seeking evidence for marketing claims by gender prediction test sold in S.F.

SAN FRANCISCO (March 10, 2010) — City Attorney Dennis Herrera today invoked his legal authority under California’s Unfair Competition Law to demand substantiation for advertising claims by Intelligender LLC that its in-home fetal gender prediction product, which is sold and marketed in San Francisco, is “totally safe” and over 90 percent accurate.

“California law empowers public sector attorneys to seek proof for marketing claims for products sold to the consumers they’re responsible to protect,” said Herrera. “Intelligender is a product that came to our attention in which some of the advertised claims are dubious, and for which supporting evidence is notably unavailable to potential customers. Women and families interested in purchasing products like this are entitled to see the evidence that will enable them to be better informed consumers.”

According to Herrera’s letter to the Plano, Tex.-based manufacturer:

“The IntelliGender Test purports to accurately identify the gender of a fetus as early as 10 weeks after pregnancy, and well before ultrasound confirmation of fetal gender is available to expectant mothers. However, according to online reviews of your product, it appears that your advertising claim that the IntelliGender Test is ‘over 90% accurate’ is questionable. Additionally, as your product packaging does not identify the contents of the IntelliGender Test, there are concerns about the safety and proper means of disposal of the Test.     

“The San Francisco City Attorney hereby requests that you provide evidence of the facts supporting the advertising claims of IntelliGender listed below, pursuant to California Business and Professions Code §17508, which empowers city attorneys to request substantiation of purportedly fact-based advertising claims. For all claims listed below indicating that scientific methods were utilized, please include full reports of experiments, methods, results, and outcomes, in addition to the CVs and biographies of the clinicians retained to perform these trials and tests.”

Herrera asked that Intelligender provide documentation responsive to his request by the end of the month, noting that we would consider seeking “an immediate termination or modification of the claim,” as state law provides, if the information were not forthcoming.

All the deets after the jump.

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Jerry Brown Throws Down: State AGs Take On Abbott Labs for Blocking Generic Competition

Thursday, January 7th, 2010

California Attorney General Jerry Brown can’t abide big drug companies illegally blocking cheap generic substitutes from coming to market in a timely fashion. Check out the news just released by Press Secretary Christine Gasparac about Abbott Laboratories (ABT) and Groupe Fourner SA and how they impeded generic competition for the cholesterol-reducing drug Tricor.

All the deets are below and here’s a pdf of the $22.5 million settlement announced this morning.

El Protector De La Gente, Jerry Brown.

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California and 23 States Reach $25 Million Settlement Against Pharmaceutical Companies that Blocked Generic Drugs

Oakland-Attorney General Edmund G. Brown Jr. and 23 other state attorneys general today announced a $22.5 million settlement with pharmaceutical giants Abbott and Fournier after the companies “illegally blocked” cheaper generic substitutes for the cholesterol-reducing drug Tricor.

The settlement is the result of one of the country’s first legal actions challenging pharmaceutical companies for “product hopping,” a strategy to block generic competition by making slight changes to the formulation of a drug.

“Abbott and Fournier devised a complex scheme that illegally blocked cheaper generic drugs from entering the market,” Brown said. “They used minor reformulations of the drug to delay competition and filed frivolous patent lawsuits. This scheme cost California and other states millions of dollars.”

Beginning in 1998, Abbott and Fournier, two of the nation’s largest pharamaceutical companies, partnered to manufacture and distribute Tricor, a cholesterol-reducing drug. Tricor’s annual sales were in excess of $750 million.

By 2002, as Tricor’s patents were set to expire, several drug companies sought approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market a generic drug equivalent to Tricor. To be approved by the FDA, the generic-drug manufacturer must prove that its drug has the same active ingredients and the same labeling as the brand-name drug, in addition to being a therapeutic equivalent of the brand-name product.

Once a generic drug is approved for market, the market share for a brand-name drug like Tricor can decrease by up to 80 percent. Most states and group health plans require pharmacists to substitute the generic drug for a brand-name drug to get the cost benefit of the cheaper generic version.

Knowing generic manufacturers were attempting to enter the market, the lawsuit alleged that Abbott and Fournier devised a complex scheme to delay and prevent the approval and marketing of generic versions of Tricor. The companies made minor changes in the form and dosage strength of Tricor that did not provide any significant health benefits over previous Tricor formulations. These minor changes interfered with and delayed any FDA approval of the generics.

To further delay the process, Abbott and Fournier also filed more than a dozen lawsuits against generic drug manufacturers Teva Pharmaceuticals and Impax Laboratories because the law prohibits the FDA from approving a generic drug for 30 months after patent-infringement lawsuits have been filed. After the 30-month automatic stays expired, all of the suits were eventually dismissed.

As a result of the scheme, Abbott and Fournier recorded Tricor sales exceeding $1 billion at the expense of consumers and state governments.

Today’s settlement agreement requires the companies to cease illegal efforts to block generic competition to Tricor and to pay the states approximately $22.5 million dollars. In California, the Department of General Services, Medi-Cal and the Department of Corrections will be reimbursed for overcharges.

States joining California in today’s lawsuit include: Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Florida, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Maryland, Minnesota, Missouri, Nevada, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Washington, and West Virginia.