Posts Tagged ‘pt. reyes’

Better Know Your Pacific Ocean Beaches of the Bay Area: NASA Photos Shows Half Moon Bay to Point Reyes

Friday, July 15th, 2011

NASA just posted a photo from the last Space Shuttle flight. It’s big, like 4000 pixels.

Here are some annotations. (The white line is the mighty San Andreas fault.)

Click to expand.“This image featuring the San Francisco Bay area was recorded with a still camera using a 180-mm lens by one of the Expedition 26 crew members aboard the International Space Station, flying 220 miles above Earth.”

And here’s the plain version at 1800 pixels:

Surf’s up.

The White Fallow Deer of Point Reyes – Originally from SF Zoo in 1948 – “NPS Genocide” and “The Bambi Effect”

Tuesday, October 19th, 2010

This is the closest I’ve ever been to The White Deer of 4.5 star Yelp-rated Point Reyes National Seashore. It was the view I had from Pierce Point Road.

Now, back in the day, the National Park Service was hiring snipers to hunt down the non-native Fallow and Axis Deer so that Tule Elk and other native species would have an easier life. Well, as detailed by Zachary Zoblig, the Bambi Effect” kicked in like you wouldn’t believe. Thusly:

“They’re just beautiful — they’re like unicorns when they come bounding out of the mist.”
 
After all the commotion, the NPS gave up on the hunting idea. The new approach is a massive contraceptive program that will eliminate these critters by 2025 or so.

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The Friends of the White Deer and Save the Point Reyes Deer are just going to have to live with that…

Good luck, Bambi.

Details of the plan, after the jump

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The Happy Sea Lions that You Can See from Sir Francis Drake Boulevard

Thursday, July 22nd, 2010

Understand that this was taken about 500 feet above the ocean, but nevertheless, this is what you can see from Sir Francis Drake Boulevard in Point Reyes right by the famous lighthouse:

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You’ll hear them before you see them.

Aar, arr, arr, arr….”

From the Cal Academy, Farallon Island Wildlife Webcam Kicks Off June 8

Wednesday, June 3rd, 2009

Mark your calendar and get your popcorn – soon you’ll be able  while away those lazy afternoons at work glued to the images you’ll see from the “FIRST EVER WEBCAM TO STREAM LIVE FOOTAGE FROM THE FARALLON NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE.”

“Just in time for the first annual World Oceans Day, the first ever webcam on the Farallon National Wildlife Refuge will go live on June 8 at http://www.calacademy.org/webcams/farallones/ Powered by solar energy and perched on a windswept lighthouse on top of Southeast Farallon Island, the webcam will provide an unprecedented view of the seabirds, seals, and possibly even sharks that call these isolated islands home.

“The live webcam feed will be accompanied by animal identification guides, Farallones history, and research and conservation information. This exciting new initiative is made possible through a cooperative partnership between the California Academy of Sciences, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and PRBO Conservation Science.”

It’s going to be mega.

See all them sharks and boids? Well, maybe not, but this is a relatively fog-free day in the Sunset District. Until the new webcam came along, this was as close as you could could get to the Farallones.

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Through the tinted glass of the ginourmous windows of Yelp-rated Sava Pool

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From a higher perspective in the Twin Peaks area, on an exceptionally clear morning.

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Can you see the lighthouse on the top of South East Farallon Island? That’s the site of the new webcam:

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Noisy Canon 10D at 840mm, from Christmas Tree Point Road, a skosh more than 30 miles away

That will have to do you until Monday.

Remember their promise: “possibly even sharks.”

FIRST EVER WEBCAM TO STREAM LIVE FOOTAGE FROM THE FARALLON NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE
Cooperative partnership between California Academy of Sciences, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and PRBO Conservation Science allows Web users to follow the action on the largest seabird colony in the continental United States

SAN FRANCISCO (May 27, 2009) – Just in time for the first annual World Oceans Day, the first ever webcam on the Farallon National Wildlife Refuge will go live on June 8 at www.calacademy.org/webcams/farallones. Powered by solar energy and perched on a windswept lighthouse on top of Southeast Farallon Island, the webcam will provide an unprecedented view of the seabirds, seals, and possibly even sharks that call these isolated islands home. The live webcam feed will be accompanied by animal identification guides, Farallones history, and research and conservation information. This exciting new initiative is made possible through a cooperative partnership between the California Academy of Sciences, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and PRBO Conservation Science.

Located 27 miles west of San Francisco, the Farallon National Wildlife Refuge is composed of three island groups that are home to the largest seabird colony in the continental United States. Approximately 250,000 seabirds representing 13 species and five species of seals and sea lions use the islands. Gray whales, blue whales, and humpback whales migrate past the islands every year. The area is also an important feeding ground for great white sharks. The refuge was established in 1909 by President Theodore Roosevelt as a preserve and breeding ground for native birds.

More deets after the jump.

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