Posts Tagged ‘public affairs’

Bevan Dufty Hires Alex Tourk and Ground Floor Public Affairs to Run Day-To-Day Aspects of Mayoral Campaign

Sunday, July 24th, 2011

The news of the day:

“Today I am announcing great addition to #teambevan. Welcome Alex Tourk. Read all about it http://t.co/RAMTdwl #sfmayor

(Does former Supervisor Bevan Dufty have a monstrously large team to run for Mayor in 2011? Sure seems that way. See below.)

Anyway, here’s how Alex Tourk will be added into the mix:

“Hiring Alex Tourk to run my campaign day-to-day in the final piece of the puzzle,” said Dufty. “I first worked with Alex Tourk in 1999 when we were both in neighborhood services for Mayor Brown. He is a veteran of many hard-fought, successful campaigns in San Francisco. I am thrilled to have his leadership, experience and talent managing my campaign.”

Bevan at the Market Street HQ:

All the deets:

Dufty Announces Campaign Team

The Bevan Dufty for Mayor campaign announced its campaign team today. “We have assembled a strong and experienced team,” said Dufty for Mayor Communications Director Roby Chavez. “The expertise they bring in terms of strategy, message, creativity and boots on the ground – combined with the experience and campaign skills of our candidate Bevan Dufty – are going to give us a huge boost in this nontraditional election.”

The Dufty campaign is being led by San Francisco-based general consultant Michael Terris of Terris, Barnes & Walters who took over the reigns in February. TBW has run campaigns in San Francisco campaigns going back to 1988, including Mayor Willie Brown’s 1999 re-elect, Assemblywoman Fiona Ma’s election in 2006, and the Yes on G/ No on F campaign to revitalize the Hunter’s Point Shipyard and Candlestick Point in 2008 and Roberta Achtenberg’s 1995 Mayoral Campaign.

The assembled Dufty for Mayor campaign team includes:

Alex Tourk’s firm Ground Floor, one of California’s leading campaign management and public affairs firms. Ground Floor has worked for Mayor Gavin Newsom, Congresswoman Jackie Speier, and Assemblyman Rich Gordon. Ground Floor has joined the team to run the campaign on a day-to-day basis and oversee the field operation.

David Binder of David Binder Research, one of the nation’s pre-eminent pollsters, has been helping candidates and causes in San Francisco and around the country for the last 27 years. His clients include President Obama, Senator Mark Leno and the California Democratic Party.

Joyce Newstat of Rocket Science Associates, a leading expert in finance, campaign fundraising, and public policy – particularly for LGBT candidates. Joyce is handling national fundraising. Joyce has worked in San Francisco politics since the late eighties including running Roberta Achtenberg’s campaign for Mayor in 1995 and serving as Mayor Newsom’s Policy Director.

Jill McCarthy brings nearly 10 years of national fundraising experience to the Dufty Campaign. She worked for the late Senator Edward M. Kennedy until he passed away, and prior to that, Senator Charles Schumer (NY) at Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, Senator Bob Graham (FL) and various other Democratic candidates. She is serving as the Finance Consultant overseeing the fundraising operation that has raised over $1 million to date.·

Mark Putnam of Putnam Partners, one of the premier Democratic media firms in the country. Putnam’s clients include President Obama (including writing and producing the half-hour television special that aired on seven networks in the final days of the 2008 campaign), Attorney General Kamala Harris, Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper, and newly elected Denver Mayor Michael Hancock (who made it through a 10 candidate primary), among many others.

Ken Strasma of Strategic Telemetry, the country’s foremost experts in microtargeting for campaigns. Strategic Telemetry’s pioneering methodology helped the Obama Campaign secure an upset victory in the Iowa caucuses in 2008 and led the way to the nomination and election.

Matt Erickson of 76 Words, an expert in campaign media and communications will produce video and online content. Matt spent over 10 years with Laguens/ Klose/Kully, one of the nations leading Democratic television firms before hanging up his own shingle with partner Sarah Flowers in 2011.

“I am very proud of this team,” said mayoral candidate Bevan Dufty. “We have the collective leadership, talent, experience, and creativity to match any campaign in the country.”

“Hiring Alex Tourk to run my campaign day-to-day in the final piece of the puzzle,” said Dufty. “I first worked with Alex Tourk in 1999 when we were both in neighborhood services for Mayor Brown. He is a veteran of many hard-fought, successful campaigns in San Francisco. I am thrilled to have his leadership, experience and talent managing my campaign.”

The Dufty campaign continues to grow. Team Bevan has raised and matched over $1 million and is reaching voters every day by phone, mail and on their doorstep.”

Mayoral Communications Director Christine Falvey Denies Edwin Lee Attended a “Re-Elect Ed Happy Hour” Last Week

Monday, July 11th, 2011

In response to this post from earlier today, Director of Mayor Edwin M. Lee’s Communications Office Christine Falvey comments:

“The caption must have been a joke. He has not attended any such events. The photo was taken at the Giants game last week.”

So that explains that, I suppose.

Anyway, that was the answer, here was the question:

“Is this photo (or its caption) newsworthy? I don’t know.

But certainly, the fact that Mayor Edwin Lee was present at a “re-elect Ed happy hour” before last week’s 6-5 victory over the San Diego Padres is news to me.

Los tres caballeros (Spanish for “bros”) y nuestro alcalde “provisional” Ed Lee:

Click to expand to see the caption. (I’d link to webpage from whence the photo came but it’s gone, long gone, down the memory hole.)  

If you think, at this late date, that the prospects for Ed Lee’s re-election weren’t front and center in the conversation The Powers That Be had last January, then you are horribly, horribly naive.

The fact that things were all mapped out for Ed Lee seven months ago makes the happy talk from The Nevius and King Randy Shaw I of the Tenderloin a little grating.

Anyway, if I were in Ed’s shoes, I’d shut down all the recent Run Ed Run talk by saying, “No, I won’t run for re-election – that would be dishonest.”

Just saying, caballero.”

Speaking of Abusing Those SFPD Press Passes, What About Parking? 80% of Chinatown Spaces Used by the Working Press?

Monday, March 21st, 2011

Read all about the recent press pass revocation issue at Fog City Journal and Josh Wolf’s Freedomania.

But what about the concomitant parking passes? Remember all the way back six years to aught-five, when the press parking sitch was “out of control?” From a 2005 meeting of the SF Police Commission:

Sergeant Neville Gittens, Public Affairs, gave a presentation in regards to issuance of press passes.  In the past, there were no check and balances in terms of who gets press passes.  All an individual had to do was to show up with some type of ID or some type of letterhead that stated that he was from a news organization and that press pass was issued to that person.  When they started looking at the issue with the press passes, they realized that the situation was out of control.  The numbers were just too high.  There have been issues in terms of parking.  The press pass entitles a person to get a parking permit.  He stated that they have done enforcement in the Chinatown area and 80 percent of the parking spaces were occupied by people that displayed the Public Affairs parking permits”

Good times. Deets below.

You can see this Ford Exploder all over town, parking wherever, whenever. Is a press parking pass better than a handicap placard? Don’t know.

Click to expand

Anyway, as promised, the deets on the parking issue, and the standards for getting a press pass from 2005, below:

March 9th, 2005

“Sergeant Neville Gittens, Public Affairs, gave a presentation in regards to issuance of press passes.  In the past, there were no check and balances in terms of who gets press passes.  All an individual had to do was to show up with some type of ID or some type of letterhead that stated that he was from a news organization and that press pass was issued to that person.  When they started looking at the issue with the press passes, they realized that the situation was out of control.  The numbers were just too high.  There have been issues in terms of parking.  The press pass entitles a person to get a parking permit.  He stated that they have done enforcement in the Chinatown area and 80 percent of the parking spaces were occupied by people that displayed the Public Affairs parking permits. These problems have been ongoing and over the last two years, his unit have tightened up the criteria and have reduced the number of press passes from 1800 to just over 700.

They has also established a good relationship with the judge at Department of Parking and Traffic.  In the past, the judge have expressed issues and problems with people that have misused the parking permits continuously and at any time the judge recognizes some abuse the person is called in and a lot of times the permits were confiscated.  The goal is to get the number down to a reasonable amount where they can reissue these parking permits and press passes yearly.

Commissioner Sparks stated that this is one issue that the Commission should have a public hearing on or at least the ability for the public to respond.  She stated that she finds it distressing that the Department is trying to reduce press passes based on criteria that there is too many. She stated that the Department would be wanting to increase and to do a better job investigating who should be eligible for a press pass and issuing to qualified people and not just arbitrarily reducing the number.

Commissioner Sparks stated that the Department needs to reevaluate how the press passes are issued, what the criteria for issuing, and update the standards.  Sergeant Gittens explained that the criteria that was used is for people that are covering breaking news that required to cross police and fire lines.  He stated that that was the criteria that wasn’t followed.   Commissioner Chan what information is required from the employer in order to credential the applicant.  Sergeant Gittens stated that first they want to verify the employment.  If it’s a situation where the person is doing that, there is also the “stringers.”  The “stringers” cover the police beat, breaking news of police and fire issues.

Commissioner Orr-Smith stated that $50 seems a scant fee for such a privileged credential.  Commissioner Orr-Smith stated that when you consider that, as working press person, the cost of permits and pass are all tax deductible. She asked that the Department takes a look at raising the fee for the press credentials.  Sergeant Gittens explained that currently the press passes are free.  It’s the parking permit that cost $50. Commissioner Sparks suggests a sliding scale might be more appropriate as far as charging.  She stated that if the Department is able to charge more money, that might help to offset the costs of more detailed background investigation or more detailed evaluation of an individual applying.”

[If anybody said, "Forget it, Jake. It's Chinatown," well, it's not in the official record.]

And, lastly, the standards for getting a press pass, AFAICT:

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT

PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICE

APPLYING FOR A SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT PRESS PASS

What Is a Press Pass?

A San Francisco Police Department Press Pass is a credential that allows the media to pass through police and fire lines for the purpose of gathering news. It does not, however, entitle the holder access to a crime scene or entry into a restricted area if

such entry interferes with the duties of emergency personnel. In addition, a press pass does not necessarily guarantee the holder access to press conferences, since access is generally controlled by the sponsor of the event and not by the San Francisco Police Department.

Who Qualifies for a Press Pass?

Only persons employed by news-gathering media who are required to cover

breaking news and to pass through police and fire lines qualify for a press pass. Feature writers and photographers, editorialists, freelance writers and pbotographers, personnel of dot-com financial and business companies, financial service broadcasters, and all staff not actively gathering news at the scene of an incident are not eligible.

Completing the Application for Press Pass

When completing the Application for Press Pass, be sure to print clearly and fill in all the required information. Sign the application and be sure that the Employer’s Statement is completed. Enclose (2) l” x 1” photographs with your completed application.

Renewing Your Press Pass

You will be required to keep your Press Pass up-to-date and will not receive any

renewal notice. Prior to tbe expiration of your press pass, contact the Public Affairs Office for renewal.

Loss or Theft of Press Pass or Change of Employment

If your press pass is lost or stolen, you must file a report with the appropriate law enforcement agency and notify the San Francisco Police Department Public Affairs Office. You must also notify the Public Affairs Office upon change of employment.

850 Bryant Street, Room 549, San Francisco, CA, 94103 Tel. (415) 553-1651 / Fax (415 553-9229 E-Mail: sfpdpbaf@ix.netcom.com

WhyTuesdaySF.org – OMG, Alex Tourk is Behind a Program NOT Called Something-Connect

Monday, March 15th, 2010

Alex Tourk, a lobbyist and head of Ground Floors Public Affairs, is the official proponent of the proposed Saturday Voting Act. Alls he needs is about seven thousand signatures and he’ll qualify this baby for the November 2010 elections. And then, if all goes to plan, you’ll be able to vote on the Saturday before Election Day plus on Election Day as well, starting 2011.

Do I think that it’s some big deal that San Franciscans don’t vote all that much? No. Am I embarassed that our voting participation rate is “worse than Bulgaria’s?” No. Do I think that non-voters in America should be deined their paychecks for three months the way they do it down Bolivia Way? No.

OTOH, it wouldn’t be necessarily a bad thing to be able to vote on Saturdays as well as Tuesdays, assuming all the deets could get worked out. But As Always, You Make The Call.

The joint is called WhyTuesdaySF.org - check it out.