Posts Tagged ‘public’

Google Seeks the “Right Balance” on the Right To Be Forgotten: “Expert Advisory Council” to Hold Meetings in Europe Soon

Friday, July 11th, 2014

The latest from the Google Blog on the so-called Right To Be Forgotten in the First Amendment-free EU:

Searching for the right balance

[So in five words I'm counting two puns and one subtle jab at the possibility of an absence of balance in this latest unappealable edict handed down from the Court of Justice.]

So here’s the wind-up:

“In May, the Court of Justice of the European Union established a “right to be forgotten.” Today, we published an op-ed by David Drummond, senior vice president of corporate development and chief legal officer, in the U.K.’s The Guardian, Germany’s Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, France’s Le Figaro and Spain’s El Pais, discussing the ruling and our response. We’re republishing the op-ed in full below. -Ed.”

And here’s the pitch – the final two grafs:

“That’s why we’ve also set up an advisory council of experts, the final membership of which we’re announcing today. These external experts from the worlds of academia, the media, data protection, civil society and the tech sector are serving as independent advisors to Google. The council will be asking for evidence and recommendations from different groups, and will hold public meetings this autumn across Europe to examine these issues more deeply. Its public report will include recommendations for particularly difficult removal requests (like criminal convictions); thoughts on the implications of the court’s decision for European Internet users, news publishers, search engines and others; and procedural steps that could improve accountability and transparency for websites and citizens.”

“The issues here at stake are important and difficult, but we’re committed to complying with the court’s decision. Indeed it’s hard not to empathize with some of the requests we’ve seen—from the man who asked that we not show a news article saying he had been questioned in connection with a crime (he’s able to demonstrate that he was never charged) to the mother who requested that we remove news articles for her daughter’s name as she had been the victim of abuse. It’s a complex issue, with no easy answers. So a robust debate is both welcome and necessary, as, on this issue at least, no search engine has an instant or perfect answer.”

“Posted by David Drummond, Senior Vice President, Corporate Development and Chief Legal Officer

Well played, G!

Oh Ho! Move Over Jeff Adachi, There’s a New PUBLIC DEFENDER in Town – Here’s the University of California’s New Ad Campaign

Monday, June 23rd, 2014

Arresting:

Here’s the pitch from this new SFMTA MUNI DPT bus stop ad campaign:

In short, UC kicks ass.

That stupid logo proposal is still being defended for what reason I don’t know, but Life Goes On at the UC.

Golden State Warriors Declare New Mission Bay Proposal a “Win-Win” Already – Here’s the Press Release

Tuesday, April 22nd, 2014

I’ll just say that “Mission Bay” doesn’t really sound like an “inland site” to me, but whatever.

Here are your key quotes from this morning’s press release:

“Private Property, 

inland site, 

private property, 

private, inland property, 

no public property”

Ok then.

Oh, and what does “digitally fit” mean? IDK.

Here it is:

“FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 22, 2014

WARRIORS MAKE A PLAY FOR MISSION BAY - Team Reaches Deal with Salesforce.com for Arena on Private Property in San Francisco

SAN FRANCISCO – The Golden State Warriors announced today terms have been reached with salesforce.com to purchase land in San Francisco’s Mission Bay neighborhood, where the team intends to build a new state-of-the-art sports and entertainment center.

Terms of the deal were not announced.

“We believe Mission Bay is a perfect fit,” said Joe Lacob, Co-Executive Chairman and CEO of the Warriors. “It is a wonderful inland site in a dynamic part of the City that is convenient for fans from all over the Bay Area. We are buying private property, but the city will also get a new 5 ½ – acre waterfront park. It’s a win-win for everyone.”

“We’ve said all along we wanted to create a spectacular cultural destination for the City and the entire region,” said Co-Executive Chairman Peter Guber “This is about a shared cultural experience: going to a beautiful and inviting place to see a game, see a show, attend a convention. It will be easily accessible, state of the art, digitally fit, and second to none.”

Although specific details of the plan remain to be announced, the Warriors said previously discussed basic elements of the event center remain in effect: the arena will hold about 18,000 seats; it will showcase NBA basketball games as well as concerts, cultural events, family shows and convention activities; and it will be privately financed on private land, virtually unprecedented among major league sports and entertainment facilities in the U.S.

The new Warriors event center will be built on 12 acres of private, inland property, bounded by 3rd, 16th and South Streets, and Terry Francois Blvd.

The transaction with salesforce.com involves no public property and no public subsidy. There are no naming rights or sponsorship rights associated with the transaction.

The Mission Bay site is well served by public transportation, and borders Muni’s 3rd Street Light Rail. The location is also within a few blocks of Caltrain, and BART connects via an easy underground connection to Muni, both at Embarcadero and at Powell Station once the Central Subway opens in 2018. The Mission Bay neighborhood already has ample parking. And a new I-280 freeway connection at Mariposa Street will land less than a block away.

Mission Bay, a former redevelopment area that became the home of UCSF’s second campus, has been emerging as a modern urban center for the past 15 years. The Warriors new home will be within walking distance of several public plazas, parks, restaurants and retail corridors. AT&T Park is only a few blocks to the north; the Dogpatch, Potrero Hill and Bayview-Hunter’s Point neighborhoods are just to the south.

A key piece of the long-planned Mission Bay redevelopment puzzle, the build-out of this site, will also trigger the construction of a new five-and-a-half-acre waterfront park. Across Terry Francois Blvd. from the arena, the park will feature water-oriented activities and large lawn areas, which can accommodate a variety of recreational uses, similar to Marina Green.

“We’ve spent the past two years listening. We’ve learned a lot. We’re proud of the plans we’ve put forward to date, and we’re thrilled to announce this great leap forward,” said Rick Welts, President and COO of the Warriors. “We are looking forward to engaging with the neighborhood and, ultimately, making this site ‘Warriors Ground.’ This is our path to San Francisco.”

The Warriors first arrived in San Francisco in 1960 and played their first 11 seasons in the City by the Bay. The Warriors new ownership, led by Lacob and Guber, purchased the team in 2010. In 2012, the team announced plans to build a new sports and entertainment facility in San Francisco. The team has targeted the 2018-19 NBA season to debut its new arena.

Mission Bay by the Numbers

11.99:
size of parcel (in acres)

18,000:
Approx. # of seats in arena

125:
Approx. height of arena (in feet)

6:
Blocks to Caltrain

0:
Blocks to Muni

0:
Blocks to BART (via underground Muni connection)

1:
Block to freeway

9,000:
Existing parking spaces in Mission Bay

160:
Current building height limit in Mission Bay (in feet)

1:
Number of Top 25 U.S. cities (by population) without a large indoor arena (San Francisco)

Sriracha Rooster Sauce Update – Thirty-Day Hold from the California Department of Public Health Causes Supply Hiccups

Tuesday, February 11th, 2014

The Inside Scoop had the scoop in December.

And now in February, the Great Cock Sauce Supply Chain is still hiccuping.

See? Where once was Huy Fong Foods hot sauce, there’s now generic-looking “Sriracha Chili Sauce” with anchovies:

Click to expand

But everything should get back to normal in March, looks like.

Ain’t found a way to kill me yet
Eyes burn with stinging sweat
Here they come to snuff the rooster, aww yeah, hey yeah
Yeah here come the rooster, yeah
You know he ain’t gonna die
No, no, no, ya know he ain’t gonna die

David Bellona’s Street Photo Wins the Internet So Far for 2014: “SF HUNGRY, MARIN DRUNK”

Friday, January 10th, 2014

[UPDATE: The car's name is REDACTED. REDACTED's owner is REDACTED  of the city of  REDACTED, CA. REDACTED is the publisher of REDACTED, per REDACTED.

Here's what REDACTED says about REDACTED's "DRUNK" license plate:

"I realize many people feel this says bad things about me. I feel that says bad things about them"

OK then.]

[UPDATE II: Alleged super-private personal information that was not actually super-private personal information but, in fact, was useful to prove to skeptical MSM-types that people can actually have a personalized license plate what spells out "DRUNK," REDACTED. Boy, aren't we touchy touchy! Awfully touchy for somebody having that on his license plate in fucking Marin, the world capital of drunk drivers. I guarantee that every cop that sees your plate does a double-take. And I thought you had posted a little ditty about your plate (because you had). But if you want to trade your exciting high-profile lifestyle ride for my boring, unnamed and aging Land Cruiser, well, let's do it, if it would help you out if your shame spiral.  In any event, REDACTED.  (In mitigation, REDACTED is NOT the publisher of Gannett Co Inc's The Bold Italic.)]

This shot from Mark DeVito has got it all.

From the streets of San Francisco, the current status of SF:

Click to expand

Indeed, this is no place for a convertible!

Let’s hope that this driver doesn’t wind up on the Marin County Sheriff’s Public Booking Log any more than the average Marinite driver…

Wow, the Uptown Tenderloin Housing Clinic’s Randy Shaw is Hopping Mad at the SF Chronicle – Let’s Take a Look

Friday, January 10th, 2014

All right, here we go:, with excerpts:

“Chronicle Gets No Stars for Falsehoods About All Star Hotel
by Randy Shaw‚ Jan. 10‚ 2014

The heart of the story—-and title of the sfgate.com version, “Slanted Floors Hotel”—blamed THC for hotel’s floors “slanted so badly that people were falling down. “ But the article does not reveal that the All Star has never been cited by the city for “slanted floors.”

ALL RIGHT, BUT JUST BECAUSE THE ALL-STAR HAS NEVER BEEN CITED BY THE CITY, DOES THAT MEAN THAT THE ALL-STAR DOESN’T HAVE SLANTED FLOORS? THE QUESTION IS WHETHER THE FLOORS ARE SLANTED. SO, ARE THEY IRL? ALSO, WHO ARE YOU, RANDY SHAW, TO DETERMINE WHAT THE “HEART OF THE STORY” IS? _I_ DON’T THINK IT’S THE HEART OF THE STORY. AND I THINK THAT STATEMENT WAS ID’ED AS A STATEMENT IN THE RECORDS OF SFGOV. WELL, IS IT REALLY A STATEMENT IN THE RECORDS OF SFGOV?  THAT’S WHAT YOUR DEFAMATION ATTORNEY (HEH!) WILL ASK ABOUT, RANDY SHAW

“San Francisco has many buildings with outstanding code violations impacting tenants lives, but the only news hook for writing about the All Star— which does not have such violations—was to attack a nonprofit operator.”

NOW WHAT KIND OF NONPROFIT OPERATOR IS THE TENDERLOIN HOUSING CLINIC – A GOOD ONE? I DON’T THINK SO. HERE’S SOME BACKGROUND, FROM A LONG TIME AGO: Randy Shaw’s Power Plays.

“I’ve seen a lot of bad reporting in my time, but the Chronicle’s attack on the THC (publisher of Beyond Chron) is among the worst.”

 IS THIS HOW YOU ARGUE, RANDY SHAW?

“A reporter with no concern with facts, and a city editor unwilling to promptly correct admitted falsehoods, resulted in a prominent article defaming the hard working janitors, desk clerks, maintenance workers, case managers and management staff at the All Star Hotel.”

WELL, THAT’S LIKE YOUR CONCLUSION, MAN. TAKE IT TO COURT RANDY! BUT YOU’LL LOSE.

“The Chronicle’s core problem was that there are no outstanding code violations impacting tenants at the All Star Hotel.”

RANDY, I THINK _YOUR_ THE ONE WITH _THE PROBLEM_, RIGHT? AND ARE YOU SAYING THAT THE HOTEL IN QUESTION DOESN’T HAVE ANY CODE VIOLATIONS ANY MORE? WHY DON’T WE SEND AN INSPECTION TEAM TO LOOK FOR SOME? OH, WHAT’S THAT, RANDY SHAW SAYS THAT ALL THAT MATTERS ARE CODE VIOLATIONS CURRENTLY “IMPACTING” TENANTS? WHO MAKES THAT CALL? IS IT YOU, RANDY SHAW? HOW DOES THAT WORK?

“Chronicle reporters all have my email address and most my cell phone number yet this reporter failed to contact the person at THC who deals with media inquiries.”

RANDY, HOW DO YOU KNOW THAT _ALL_ REPORTERS AT THE CHRONICLE HAVE YOUR EMAIL ADDRESS? THE REPORTER CONTACTED YOUR ORG AND HE DIDN’T GET A RESPONSE, RIGHT? WELL, THAT’S WE HE WROTE, RIGHT?

“Nothing in the story refutes the statement by THC’s manager that all violations were addressed.”

THE HEART OF THE STORY IS ABOUT _PAST_ VIOLATIONS THOUGH, RIGHT? AND HOW LONG DID THAT PROCESS TAKE?

But then the Chronicle allows Eldon Brown, who has no technical expertise and has likely filed more DBI complaints than all of THC’s over 1700 tenants combined (32 alone in 2012-13), to raise fears of tenant safety by making baseless claims about an unstable building.

DOES ONE NEED TO HAVE “TECHNICAL EXPERTISE” TO FILE A COMPLAINT WITH DBI? THAT DOESN’T SOUND RIGHT. AND THE QUESTION IS WHETHER THE BUILDING IS UNSTABLE. WELL, IS IT? AND YOU ONLY HAVE 1700 TENANTS? AREN’T YOU THE LARGEST NONPROFIT IN SF? MAYBE WE SHOULD JUST STOP GIVING YOU MONEY, HUH RANDY SHAW?

“THC is reviewing its legal options.”

YOU’RE NOT GOING TO SUE ANYBODY, YOU BIG BLOWHARD.

HEY, RANDY SHAW. WHY DON’T YOU DO A BETTER JOB WITH THE MONEY WE GIVE YOUR ORG – HOW ABOUT THAT?

OMG, KQED Touches the Third Rail by Dissing West AND East Oakland – See the “Offending Paragraph” Here

Wednesday, November 20th, 2013

Start here:

A San Franciscan’s Guide to Living in Oakland“  | November 19, 2013 | 123 Comments

Then read the inevitable retraction here:

Oakland, We Hear You!“ -  | November 19, 2013 | 18 Comments

Then read this graf here, the one that got deleted, never to return:

“Don’t Be Scared

The only rule to living here is to find where to go and not to go. The places I am going to take you on a tour through will label me as “bougie” by Oakland standards, but I don’t think there is anything elitist about coming home in one piece. So stay out of East Oakland and West Oakland. That doesn’t sound like it leaves much, but it does. Trust me, my friends have been violently mugged in East Oakland and had the same house robbed three times in West Oakland. But be my guest if you want to go to either for ‘cool points.’”

Oh, here it is:

Click to expand

If KQED wants to do this kind of stuff, it should label the post as an editorial or as a reader contribution or something like that. I’ll tell you, another big corporate website in town, carpet-bagging Gannett Co Inc’s west coast loss-maker,* The Bold Italic, similarly runs into trouble when it runs similar kinds of posts.

I’m saying that this kind of post, presented the way it was, damages the KQED brand.

Could KQED Forum do a radio call in show about this incident for a full hour? Heck yes.

That’s certainly an option, KQED people.

*Millions and millions of dollars all told. 

Announcing San Francisco’s “Entrepreneurship-in-Residence” (EIR) Program – Only “World-Class” Entrepreneurs Need Apply

Friday, September 6th, 2013

Remember Oskar Schindler and the Third Reich? Would you consider that whole deal a successful “public-private partnership?” I mean, was it “world-class?” Did it address “government pain points?” IDK.

Anyway, here’s the latest – I didn’t see this one coming. (Perhaps Con Ronway did. IDK.)

“SAN FRANCISCO MAYOR ANNOUNCES PROGRAM TO INTRODUCE WORLD-CLASS ENTREPRENEURS TO THE $142 BILLION PUBLIC SECTOR MARKET

Mayor Ed Lee invites entrepreneurs to develop technology-enabled products and services for government, the largest consumer of products and services in the nation

SAN FRANCISCO – September 6th, 2013 – Mayor Edwin M. Lee, in collaboration with the White House and other strategic partners, today announced San Francisco’s Entrepreneurship-in-Residence (EIR) program. “We need the top entrepreneurs to work with us on opportunities that are actual pain points and needs of government. San Francisco’s EIR program advances our role and vision as the Innovation Capital of the World,” said Mayor Ed Lee.

The program is inspired by President Obama’s call, “We’ve got to have the brightest minds to help solve our biggest challenges.” San Francisco’s EIR program will select talented entrepreneurial teams and help them develop technology-enabled products and services that can capitalize on the $142 billion public sector market.

“San Francisco’s program is one of the first EIR programs within government, who is by far, the largest customer of products and services in the nation,” commented Jay Nath, San Francisco’s Chief Innovation Officer. “The entrepreneurial products and services developed through San Francisco’s EIR program should drive significant impact such as increased revenue, enhanced productivity or meaningful cost savings.”

The program plans to attract world-class entrepreneurs and technologists by providing them with direct access to government needs and opportunities, staff and their expertise, in addition to product development, ramp-up support, and insights into a gold mine of government problems and opportunities through the City and County of San Francisco.

“Products and services that successfully solve issues faced by San Francisco can easily expand to addressing similar needs of other cities and states across the nation in addition to the private sector,” said Rahul Mewawalla, a senior executive with leadership experiences across Fortune 500 and high growth companies who is leading the program. “We expect to drive significant innovation and growth in areas of pressing importance such as data, mobile and cloud services, healthcare, education, transportation, energy and infrastructure.”

San Francisco’s EIR program will offer selected teams mentorship from senior public leaders across the Mayor’s office and San Francisco departments and from private sector leaders with experience at companies such as McKinsey & Company, Nokia, NBC Universal, General Electric, Yahoo!, and Goldman Sachs. The program expects to select 3 to 5 teams and announce the selected teams in early October, during San Francisco’s Innovation Month. The program will run 16 weeks from mid-October, 2013 through mid-February, 2014.

Entrepreneurial teams are invited to learn more and apply at http://entrepreneur.sfgov.org http://entrepreneur.sfgov.org

What We’re Looking For

  1. Your product or service should address areas of topical relevance to the public sector (e.g. related to data, healthcare, transportation, education, energy, infrastructure, mobile and civic engagement, public assets, etc.)
  2. Your team should be pursuing an opportunity that has large economic potential ($100M+ market) and significant impact potential (increased revenue, enhanced productivity, meaningful cost savings, etc.).
  3. Your product or service should be technology enabled and have broad applicability across SF and other cities and states and across public and private sector customers.
  4. Preference is given for products or services in advanced stages of development and rollout or existing products that could also address government needs. If you are in a position to build out the product or service within 16 weeks, that is fine as well.
  5. Your product shows promise to be self-sustainable.
  6. Your team demonstrates high likelihood of success based on prior professional and personal experiences.
  7. Preference for teams over sole individuals; if sole individual, please elaborate on how you will build a team and accomplish program objectives within 16 weeks.

Example Government Pain Points

The following are just examples of problems facing government. Applicants do not have to solve these particular problems. It is most important to clearly demonstrate how your product could benefit from this program and that it can solve a real challenge.

  • How can we better leverage the growth in open data and enable easier data mining and analysis to enable better decisions?
  • How can we better utilize our public assets to generate additional revenue?
  • How can we make available better healthcare choices and services given the upcoming implementation of the affordable healthcare act?
  • How can we improve our recruiting and hiring applications for more efficient and productive hiring?
  • How can we improve transportation efficiencies to improve transit times and reduce costs?
  • How can we track and optimize our energy purchases and usage?
  • How can we improve our asset tracking system across real estate, fleet, equipment, etc to increase usage, lower costs and enhance utilization?
  • How can we use a digital public notification system for urban interventions and streetscape improvements to help local businesses and their growth?

What You Can Expect

The selection process will be through an open and competitive application process. Applications will be used to assess the qualifications, fit and likelihood of success of the applicants.

Selection will be made by SF EIR selection group composed of public and private sector leaders with innovation, Fortune 500, startup and venture capital experience.

We will be reviewing applications on a rolling basis. It is in the applicant’s best interest to apply early. We will announce selected teams in early October, with the program beginning in mid-October and wrapping up in mid-February.

MENTORS

Entrepreneurs can expect to have access to a range of experts and advisors in the private and public sectors. These industry and government leaders will help your team define and achieve success in the civic innovation space with San Francisco agencies and departments as your key focus group and customers over the four month program. Below are just a handful of currently committed mentors.

Well, As Expected, the $7 Fee at the Strybing Arboretum is Going to Become Permanent – A Little History

Friday, June 28th, 2013

Boy there’s a lot of overhead involved with the whole process of charging people $7 to walk through the former Strybing Arboretum, it sure looks like.

Anyway, here’s a little background on how we’ve gotten to this point:

LMA-BOS-Supporter Talking Points-6-4.21.13 Budget Hearing

Arboretum Contract Critique

And here’s a post from 2010:

“Not sure how many people were at last night’s ”workshop” to discuss the idea of charging admission at San Francisco Botanical Garden (aka Strybing Arboretum) in Golden Gate Park ’cause I left before it ended. But the hand-count totaled 225 souls, so let’s call that a gentleman’s 250 altogether for the crowd.

Here’s the thing - people on both sides all seem to know each other and care deeply about The Garden. This conflict seems a kind of civil war (hence the Antietam name check, yes it rhymes exactly), a family squabble. It’s plant-loving Brother against plant-loving-but-other-stuff-too Brother. Get up to speed on this dispute here.

Now, once more into the breach, dear friends.

The mise-en-scene last night. It’s Recreation and Park Commission President Jim Lazarus taking individual questions from a hostile crowd, split up unnecessarily, it turned out, into three sections. This is what the bulk of the meeting looked like. Click to expand:

But let’s start at the beginning. Below, it’s the organized neighbors! They taped up hundreds of small signs to draw attention to the meeting. Did workers from DPW spend a lot of time taking down the unofficial notices? Apparently. Were any official notices put up, like last time? Not that I could see.

Inside, the fellow on the left, (didn’t get his name, someone called him The Kid) tried to get things started, but vocal members of the crowd didn’t like the agenda that was handed out, particularly they didn’t like being split up into three groups.

The guy with the ponytail went off, and the Eli in the Yale jacket on the right pleaded for calm. Thank Gaia for Yalies:

After a couple go-arounds like that, The Kid threatened to cancel the meeting. (Arboretum staff appears to view hosting public meetings like these as doing a favor to Arboretum visitors, and truth be told, if San Francisco officials are dead-set on allowing the charging of admission, they can do it regardless of what regular Arboretum visitors want.) Here’s a ten-minute video of the action.

But after a brief huddle, redolent of a friendly car salesperson taking your low-ball offer to the Big Guy…

…out comes lawyer Jim Lazarus calling an audible to change the meeting’s format. He seemed every bit the experienced pol he is.

The new agenda that got worked out with leadership elements from the masses: an uninterupted 10-15 minute “general presentation” of the plan. “Then you can decide how much you want to beat us up after that,” said Jimbo. “You can shoot us all when it’s over.”

This Lazarus Effect resuscitated the meeting. So, let’s hear The Proposal.

The Arboretum would set up pre-fab ticket kiosks at the Main Gate and the Friend Gate (near the Japanese Tea Garden) for $65K and then hire four part-time cashiers, a manager(?), and also a part-time accountant for $148K per year. San Francisco residents would enter for free after showing some sort of ID. Those useless freeloading parasites known as Everybody Else in the World would pay $7, or $4 (students and seniors), or $2 (kids) each time they go in. They’d have the option of getting a $75 annual pass that would also allow entry at the Japanese Tea Garden and the Conservatory of Flowers – something like that.

The projected 100,000 in paid admissions would have a “blended average” of $5.50 per, resulting in a gross take of $550K. Take away $150K for expenses and you end up with an annual net of $400K, of which $100-150K would go into the Rec and Park kitty and the rest could go into whatever, like hiring more gardeners at $68K salary (plus 25% more in benefits).

The goal would be to eventually get up to a full complement of 16 gardeners, which will “never happen” without some new source of Arboretum-specific cashola.

That’s it.

“KEEP THE ARBORETUM FREE”

What about residents of neighboring counties in the Bay Area you say? It doesn’t matter, all auslanders gotta pay.

What about the rumoured $1.3 million cost of building the kiosks and other related expenses? That was just a “Cadillac proposal” dreamed up by somebody or other – the bare bones approach discussed last night would not be as nice, but it would get the job done.

This charismatic-messianic type got lots of applause for questioning the whole idea of charging anybody anything, regardless of the numbers:

Mr. Lazarus acknowledged the fear San Francisco residents have of being the next in line to be charged, the fear that admission prices would then increase after that. No promises on that front. Que sera sera.

But I’ll let the Keep the Arboretum Free people delve into these issues more. When I left, Lazarus was answering questions one by one, Phil Donahue-style.

“FREE means NO FEES, NO I.D.s”

Oh yes, the “next terrible meeting” promised by Jimbo will concern paid parking in Golden Gate Park. (Do people really plant their vehicle in the park for free and then run all over town all day? People do.)

Random observations:

The estimate of $148k annually to pay salaries for  the paid admission scheme sounds low. Way low, particularly in light of what cashiers at the Japanese Tea Garden get paid.

Park and Rec knows how to notice a public meeting but, for whatever reason, it appears to have done a bush-league job of noticing last night’s workshop.

Next up next month in June: the action will move over to City Hall and the Board of Supervisors. When will our civil war end?

Public Workshop – Botanical Garden

When: May 28, 2009 – Thursday 6:30 to 8:00 p.m.
Where: County Fair Building, 9th Avenue and Lincoln Avenue, San Francisco
What: In response to the feedback received on the proposed admission program at Botanical Garden, the Rec & Park Department decided there will not be a fee for residents. The revised proposal does include a $7. fee for nonresident visitors. Public workshop is to take feedback regarding revised proposed admission fee and will be seeking topics including:
Implementation of the new fee for non-San Francisco residents.
Amenities at the Garden.
Potential new revenue sources.

To Be Continued…