Posts Tagged ‘public’

The Giants, Stephen Curry, and Hillary Rodham Clinton: 2016 was a Tough Year for This Heroes Section of the San Francisco Public Library

Monday, November 21st, 2016

SFPL, Park Branch, Haight Ashbury, USA. (Thanks, Andrew Carnegie, sort of.

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(Oh, maybe that’s not for our San Francisco Giants.)

Anyway, sometimes you win the most games in a year or win the most votes in an election, but you don’t end up winning the big prize at the end.

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UCSF Popo Enter the Tenderloin – “UC Hastings Entering Public Safety Partnership with UCSF Police

Wednesday, October 26th, 2016

I had missed this news, but you can’t miss all the new UCSF vehicles on McAllister these days. Changing things was quite a big issue earlier this year. Anyway:

“Affected members of the UC Hastings Public Safety officer’s unit have been presented various employment options if they meet required qualifications, as police officers, security guards, or security guard supervisors for the UCSF Police Department. For officers who do not qualify (or elect to not apply) for jobs with the UCSF Police Department or alternative positions with UC Hastings, the College will offer conscientious separation terms.”

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So that’s that – the oldest and largest law school in the West is now a little closer to the UC Family.

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If You Don’t Approve of an SFMTA MUNI Bus Ad About Palestine or Israel, Just Tear It Off, Like This

Thursday, September 29th, 2016

If you want to see this ad from before, click here.

Anyway, here’s how one of the ads looks now – riiiiiip:

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Take a Look at the Latest Ad on the Sides of SFMTA MUNI Buses

Friday, September 9th, 2016

Let’s try to make sense of SFMTA/MUNI’s ad policy.

An ad for a movie like this…

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isn’t allowed, because it shows the use of firearms. So we ended up with this kind of SFMTA ad:

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But this kind of ad, on the streets today, is A-OK:

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Oh, I Guess the Hated / Beloved Pedestrian Bridge over Geary at Webster is Going to Stay After All? – Geary BRT Update

Monday, August 1st, 2016

Look at all this stuff our SFCTA was going to do:

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Note “Roadway redesign – mid 2016”

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Well guess what – the SFCTA / SFMTA recently caved, so the Bridge Over The River Geary will remain at Webster.

So all these meetings were a big success, or a huge failure for the SFCTA, depending on how you look at it.

And look at all the Haterade that the SFCTA poured over the pedestrian bridges of Geary – and this is just 20% of the references made:

In the Japantown and Fillmore areas, there are closed crosswalks and circuitous pedestrian bridges that are not compliant with accessibility standards for people with disabilities.

In the Japantown area, as depicted in Figure 1-6, some aspects that discourage pedestrian movement and activity include narrow medians and circuitous pedestrian bridges that intimidate some and are not compliant with accessibility standards for people with disabilities.

Spanning Geary Boulevard are two pedestrian bridges at the Webster Street and Steiner Street intersections, where closed crosswalks limit pedestrians‟ ability to cross Geary Boulevard at ground level. These overcrossings are several decades old and, although they provide separation from traffic, are often perceived as an inconvenient way of crossing Geary Boulevard due to the long and indirect ramps, change in elevation required, and some users‟ sense of insecurity. Additionally, the pedestrian overcrossings are not compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), hindering the mobility of people with disabilities.

Pedestrian bridges at Steiner Street and Webster Street: These two pedestrian overcrossings would be removed, to eliminate conflicts between these structures‟ piers and the proposed bus lanes, as well as to provide new pedestrian crossings at street grade.

Two pedestrian bridges span Geary Boulevard at the Webster Street and Steiner Street intersections. The grade-separated walkways allow pedestrians to cross over Geary Boulevard. These overcrossings are several decades old and are perceived as an inconvenient way of crossing due to the long and indirect ramps, change in elevation required, and some users’ sense of insecurity. Additionally, the pedestrian overcrossings are not compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) due to their average inclines exceeding the ADA standard of a five percent maximum grade (i.e. a slope increasing in elevation by five feet for every 100 feet in length), which makes wheelchair crossings difficult.

Like I said, this is just 20% of the vitriol our SFCTA spewed upon these two bridges in just one document. I get the feeling these SFCTA people would say just about anything to get nine figures from the Feds. I mean if the Feds would give the SFCTA $100,000,000 to recommend keeping everything on Geary EXACTLY THE SAME FOR THE NEXT TEN YEARS, then I’ll bet the we would have gotten a document what extols the virtues of these bridges.

Anyway, the Webster bridge is staying, that’s the news.

SFMOMA Opening Day 2016: “NEW SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF MODERN ART NOW OPEN” – Bigger and Better

Saturday, May 14th, 2016

Here it is:

“FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: NEW SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF MODERN ART NOW OPEN – Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi and Mayor Edwin Lee Joined SFMOMA Director Neal Benezra, Board Chairman Charles Schwab and Board President Bob Fisher to Inaugurate Expanded Museum – More than 5,000 Visitors Welcomed to Museum For Free Today

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The new SFMOMA from Howard Street; photo by Devlin Shand, courtesy Drew Altizer Photography

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Charles Schwab, Robert Fisher, Neal Benezra and Nancy Pelosi, Edwin Lee and Craig Dykers; photo by Drew Altizer, courtesy Drew Altizer Photography

SAN FRANCISCO, CA (May 14, 2016)—With a blizzard of red confetti, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) opened its doors to the public today, May 14. Opening Day festivities were attended by local dignitaries, members of the Bay Area arts community and the general public. After the program, the first visitors were welcomed to the new museum by SFMOMA staff and leadership.

The program included remarks by Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi, Mayor Edwin Lee, SFMOMA Board Chairman Charles Schwab, SFMOMA Board President Bob Fisher and SFMOMA’s Helen and Charles Schwab Director Neal Benezra. The museum distributed more than 5,000 free timed tickets for Opening Day to the public. Surrounding cultural institutions including the Museum of the African Diaspora, the Contemporary Jewish Museum, the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, the Children’s Creativity Museum and many more throughout the Yerba Buena Cultural District also offered free admission and programming to celebrate the return of SFMOMA to the neighborhood.

“After years of planning and construction, it feels terrific to welcome visitors back to the museum,” said Neal Benezra. “With our goal of providing more art to more people, now and for generations to come, we are excited to share the new museum experience we have created that features the distinguished Doris and Donald Fisher Collection, new works gifted or promised to us by 230 generous donors and the Pritzker Center for Photography which deepens our commitment to the medium.”

SFMOMA, which opened today with 19 inaugural exhibitions, underwent a three-year transformation to add a 10-story expansion designed by international architecture firm Snøhetta that nearly triples its gallery space, allowing the museum to show more of its exceptional collection of modern and contemporary art. With free admission for guests ages 18 and younger and 45,000 square feet of free public space, SFMOMA is more open to the community than ever before.

“Today, with the opening of this gorgeous museum expansion, San Francisco affirms our city’s place as a global leader of art and culture,” said Congresswoman Pelosi. “The new SFMOMA is a manifestation of our city’s deep respect for creativity, and it embodies the spirit and the generosity of the entire Bay Area Community. For that, we are very proud, and very thankful indeed.”

“San Francisco is a city of big ideas, and SFMOMA is a really big idea—and now, a big reality,” said Mayor Lee. “Not only is the new SFMOMA a place to showcase innovative art, culture and education initiatives, but it is a piece of art itself in the Yerba Buena Art District. The museum is a major draw for visitors, residents, families and youth from around the world, and its contribution to the Bay Area economy will now grow significantly with its new expansion.”

SFMOMA OPENING DAY EVENTS

SFMOMA’s Opening Day began with street performers on Howard Street including entertainment by the Circus Center, SFJAZZ High School All Stars, the San Francisco Youth Ballet Ribbon Dancers and We Talk Chalk.

After remarks, at the museum’s new entrance on Howard Street, the speakers and architect Craig Dykers, founding partner of Snøhetta, ceremonially opened the museum by pressing a large red button with the new SFMOMA logo on it, releasing a blizzard of red confetti from the roof of the new museum and adjacent buildings. The Golden State Warriors Aftershock Drumline played while SFMOMA staff members in red shirts paraded with large red balloons. Ribbon dancers from the San Francisco Youth Ballet led the first visitors into the building.|

Free admission on Opening Day was made possible in part by PG&E, a partner in making the new SFMOMA a model for energy efficiency for art museums through participation in the Step Up and Power Down and Savings by Design programs, The Yerba Buena Community Benefits District and the museum’s Premier Sponsors Bank of America and Cadillac.

SFMOMA HOURS AND ADMISSION

SFMOMA is open to the public seven days a week from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. through Labor Day. Free public spaces open at 9 a.m. daily. The museum hosts extended hours on Thursdays until 9 p.m., giving visitors the opportunity to enjoy exhibitions and programs in the evening.

Annual membership begins at $100, and members enjoy unlimited free admission (with advance reservation). Adult admission to SFMOMA is $25 and admission for seniors 65 years and older is $22. Admission for visitors ages 19 through 24 is $19. SFMOMA provides free admission to all visitors 18 and younger, furthering its goal of building the next generation of art lovers.

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
151 Third Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

Founded in 1935 as the first West Coast museum devoted to modern and contemporary art, a thoroughly transformed SFMOMA features significantly enhanced gallery, education and public spaces. With six art-filled terraces, a new sculptural staircase and Roman steps where the public can gather, access to 45,000 square feet of free art-filled public space and free admission for visitors age 18 and younger, SFMOMA is more welcoming and more connected to San Francisco than ever before.

Visit sfmoma.org or call 415.357.4000 for more information.

Apparently, People Use the Pedestrian Bridges Over Geary Quite a Bit – A Newsflash for our SFMTA SFCTA Alphabet Soup

Friday, December 11th, 2015

Just saying

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I don’t know if it was such a great idea to build these bridges and I also don’t know if it’s such a great idea to spend big big bucks to tear them down…

SFCTA Confirms Public Comment Cards for Geary BRT Stolen – But Some Returned “Anonymously” – Comment Deadline Extended

Thursday, November 12th, 2015

Here’s the latest on this issue, from the SFCTA, below.

If our SFCTA wanted to handle this issue with the least possible effort, then I give it an A+, or a passing grade if we’re grading pass/fail. Another approach would have been to notice another meeting and yada yada.

This project has been on the radar for a long, long time, but I never really paid attention to it until the pedestrian bridges issue came up. If the SFCTA were a person and we took what it said seriously, I’d tell you that our SFCTA is in deep denial on this bridges issue.

(And how much would a BART spur under Geary end up costing, like a billion dollars a mile, like our already-failed Central Subway? Is something like this unreachable pie in the sky? IDK.)

Anyway, here it is:

“To the Participants at the Geary Bus Rapid Transit Project’s November 5, 2015, public comment meeting:
Thank you very much for the time you spent coming to the meeting to learn about the project and for submitting comments on the Draft Environmental Document. Your input is important and appreciated.
Unfortunately, we wish to provide notice that during the meeting, at approximately 7:10 p.m., sign-in sheets with your personal contact information and a few completed comment cards were stolen, at least some of which were later returned by mail anonymously. We sincerely apologize for this incident and have contacted the police about it.
We take your privacy seriously. When we share publicly the comments submitted to us by community members, our policy is to remove any personal contact information. We do not share any personal contact information with third parties, nor do we condone the use of stolen contact information by others. Please let us know if you receive any suspicious communications from anyone who would not normally have access to your phone number or email address. It may help with the investigation of this incident.
Third, in response to these extenuating circumstances, we are extending the public comment period until November 30, 2015, and we encourage you to contact us if you submitted a comment card at the public meeting before 7:10 p.m. and are concerned about whether we received it.
Feel free to contact us to verify your comment’s receipt, or simply submit another comment, via email at gearybrt@sfcta.org.
Regards…”

Here’s One of the Pedestrian Bridges that Our SFCTA Now Despises – 99% of Us Can Use It, Of course

Tuesday, November 10th, 2015

Here you go, click here and then Control-F for the phrase pedestrian bridge – 26 mentions you will find.

Can you see anything positive at all mentioned about the bridges of J-Town? Perhaps our SFCTA doesn’t think there are any? Or perhaps it thinks it’s writing an advocacy document and so it feels free to lie? IDK.

There were about a dozen people on the bridge when this photo was taken – they’re hard to spot:

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And if these bridges aren’t up to standards, well, then why hasn’t anybody sued us over accessibility? Perhaps they are up to standards?

And oh yes, DEAR SFCTA – YOUR QUICK AND DIRTY GEARY BRT PROJECT AIN’T TOO QUICK, NOW, IS IT?

Oh well.

Our SFCTA SFMTA Tries to Impress the Feds But Loses Box of Public Comment Cards? – Geary BRT – 75 Million Smackers

Monday, November 9th, 2015

Is this the box what got swiped from the basement of St. Mary’s the other day?

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I think it is!

(That’s what some railfan/urbanist/Googler told me, and this particular demographic has ne’er lied to me yet.)

And what’s that, the whole point of this meeting was primarily to be able to tell the FTA that we had a meeting so give us some money money money?

“As the San Francisco Examiner reported, Geary BRT is jockeying for a $75 million grant from the Federal Transit Administration’s Small Starts fund, which may be awarded after public input is taken on the draft environmental impact report.”

And this drive for money is what fuels the SFMTA’s rabid hatred of the pedestrian bridges in the Japantown area on Geary?

Oh, I see!

Gentle Reader, check out any EIR, draft or whatever, then control-F for “pedestrian bridge” and then brace for the haterade. Shouldn’t an EIR, draft or whatever, outline the pros and cons of destroying the ped bridges? And hey, does the SFCTA want to tear down all structures in town what aren’t 100% ADA compliant right now? Oh, no, just these bridges?

(I should say that the SFCTA is already on secret double probation for the disastrous Central Subway and the failing T-Third, among other crimes and misdemeanors.)

On It Goes.

Will the Geary BRT be a good thing? IDK. But certainly, the honest answer to this question won’t come from our SFCTA. (Perhaps we should pay them $75 million to recommend doing nothing and then we’d be better off, IDK. )

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