Posts Tagged ‘PUC’

If You Think BROWN IS THE NEW GREEN During Our Great Drought, Get This Free Sign from Our SFPUC

Friday, April 17th, 2015

If you want to do something about the North American Drought of 2012 – 20xx, you can always drop by at our expensive SFPUC building in the western Twitterloin:

“Signage is available for pick-up at the SFPUC Customer Service Center, 525 Golden Gate Avenue, 1st Floor. Request larger quantities by email landscape@sfwater.org”

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These “Rain Gardens” on Fell Street are Now Complete – Will They Make You Like the SFPUC More?

Tuesday, April 7th, 2015

IDK, maybe they will.

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Of course, this design is the “beautiful” version. (What would an ugly rain garden look like, one wonders.)

And look, the “natural” weeds have already been carefully planted. Is our PUC going to water these weeds, you know, during the months and months when we don’t get any rain at all, to keep them green and “beautiful?” We’ll see.

(BTW, if you label the PUC the PUC, at least a few employees / contractors / interns / somebody who has access to the PUC’s email system just might hector you about instead calling the PUC “SF Water,” or SF Water Power Sewer. Let’s hope our SFPUC isn’t paying its employees $114 an hour on the side to email about how “confused” I am with my belief that the SFPUC can, at least sometimes, be rightfully be called the SFPUC.)

But, Gentle Reader, the well-paid PUC outreach people say that you can take a “tour” of these rain gutters if you want. Email at ssip@sfwater.org

Here They Are, Our Brand-New “Beautiful. Functional. Rain Gardens” on Fell – Like Parklets, But for Weeds, Not People

Wednesday, April 1st, 2015

[UPDATE: Our PUC writes in tell about how I’m confusing them with the CAPUC, the same way, one supposes that Mssrs. Matier and Ross got “confused” when calling them the PUC here. But take their tour if you want – see Comments.]

Remember the revival of “Victory Gardens?” I do. It peaked in 2009. But the new thang in urban gardening is upon us.

As seen on Fell, looking inbound:

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(Oh, and the microfences already indicate that no bike parking is allowed. So what’s the PUC going to do? Ticket your ride? Cut off your lock and impound your bike?)

On Fell, looking outbound:

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And look, clobblestones!

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Are these real cobblestones? One can’t tell. Should they be? One doesn’t know.

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All right, that was the windup, and now here’s the pitch, from the SFPUC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of PG&E:

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Are these realtor-backed parklets “beautiful?” I don’t think so. Will they “improve safety?” I don’t see how. And actually, spending tax and fee payer money on “streetscape” “beauty” instead of safety is the opposite of  “improving safety,” PUC. Oh, and PUC, if you ever want to talk about how best to “manage” California’s water resources for the benefit of all Californians, look me up, cause you’re doing it wrong…

All the deets:

Oak Street and Fell Street Pedestrian and Bike Safety Project

Picture of Bulbout Area

Learn More About the Project

Check out SFMTA’s project website to learn more!

Improving Traffic Safety and Enhancing Stormwater Collection

The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) is teaming up with the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA) on the Oak Street and Fell Street Pedestrian and Bike Safety Project to integrate stormwater management with their traffic calming project.

In response to strong public feedback for more greenery and planting for the project, we’ve added rain gardens to the bulbouts along Oak and Fell Streets. A rain garden is a stormwater management technique which infiltrates stormwater into the soil, diverting water from going into the sewer. This addition to the project will benefit community members; not only will the project make residents and travelers safer, the rain gardens will add beauty and character to the intersections. Our partnership with the SFMTA will extend the improvements already underway. While the addition of green infrastructure will not result in any additional parking losses beyond what was approved by the SFMTA Board of Directors in May 2012, four of the bulbouts will be larger than initially proposed. Originally scheduled for construction in late 2013, the project is slated to begin construction in early summer 2014.

Contact:

For construction inquiries, please contact:

Dadisi Najib – SFDPW
Email: Dadisi.Najib@sfdpw.org

Luis Montoya – SFMTA
Email: luis.montoya@sfmta.com

Ari Frink – SFPUC
Email: afrink@sfwater.org

For more project information, visit SFMTA’s site here.

Great Drought of 2014: Ten Percent Mandatory Outdoor Irrigation Conservation Measures Announced for San Francisco

Tuesday, August 12th, 2014

As expected, here it is:

“Tuesday, August 12, 2014

S.F. Public Utilities Commission Ratifies 10% Mandatory Outdoor Irrigation Conservation Measures

Restrictions Comply with State Water Resources Control Board’s New Emergency Regulations for Outdoor Urban Water Use

San Francisco, CA – On August 12th, the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) passed new emergency outdoor irrigation restrictions for all of its retail customers. The regulations feature a mandate to reduce potable water use by 10% for outdoor irrigation of ornamental landscape and turf. They also require that the SFPUC implement its plan to reduce wasteful outdoor water use.

The new restrictions for outdoor irrigation take effect mid-September and last through June 30, 2015. Only water customers that have metered irrigation accounts will be issued a usage allocation based on a 10% reduction of their 2013 usage. During that September – June timeframe, customers’ usage must not exceed their allocation. Customers will be able to track how they are doing on each bill. At the next scheduled meeting of the SFPUC, Commissioners will consider an excess use charge of 2x the billing rate for every unit in excess of a customer’s allocation. While metered irrigation accounts are the easiest to track, the SFPUC is asking all of its retail customers to comply. Edible food gardens and areas that are irrigated with non-potable water are exempted.

Concurrently, the SFPUC will also be implementing an education-first plan to reduce wasteful outdoor water use by prohibiting certain water-wasting activities, which include:

· Watering outdoor landscapes in a manner that causes excess runoff;
· Using a hose, without a shut-off nozzle, for any purpose;
· Using drinking water in non- recirculating fountains or decorative water devices; and,
· Washing down driveways/sidewalks except for health and safety purposes.

The exemption for health and safety purposes is strictly limited to: the removal of human and animal waste; the removal of liquids and substances that cause odors, sticky, slick and unsafe conditions for pedestrians; and, the elimination of conditions that attract insects and vermin.
Reports of water waste will be tracked through 311. The SFPUC will be focusing on education and training, not policing and fining. Reported water wasters will be sent a warning notice for reported violations. Only after three warning notifications, clear documentation, and a site-visit by SFPUC staff, will citations be considered. Fines will start at $100 per violation and will require approval by the SFPUC General Manager before issuance. Fines are a last resort only and appeals will be routed through the City Controller’s office.
The new regulations will assist San Francisco in meetings its 10% conservation request. Fortunately, customers have consistently met and exceeded the 10% voluntary conservation request this summer. This savings-spree is making up for lost time earlier in the year when customers were not meeting their goals.

- Total Hetch Hetchy Regional Water System storage stands at 61% of maximum storage capacity.

- As of August 4, total water savings has dramatically swelled to 3.9 billion gallons of water – almost triple from what it was on June 23.

- If the current conservation trend continues, the SFPUC projects meeting the 10% savings goal for the entire year. This will stave off the need for additional system wide water restrictions this year.

“We don’t know when this drought will end,” said SFPUC General Manager Harlan L. Kelly, Jr. “The mandatory outdoor irrigation reduction is a small, but important step as we continue conserving and diversifying our precious water supplies.”

The SFPUC provides reliable, high quality drinking water to 2.6 million customers in San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara and Alameda counties. Updates and additional information will be available at sfwater.org/conservation.

Question: How Many Gallons of Water has the City of San Francisco Recycled Since 1850? The Answer Will Amaze You!

Monday, August 11th, 2014

Or not. I mean, why would I ask if the answer were anything but zero?

Here’s your super-pure, “better than Evian” Hetch Hetchy drinking water at work right here:

In other news, your SFPUC is working on a plan to downgrade the quality of your water on purpose, because, because…

In still yet other news, the SFPUC is better than you because it paid your money to buy a LEED certification for its new building on Golden Gate from the LEED people – this is so that the SFPUC can be shining exemplar for us all to follow.

“I would not call it less pure at all. I would call it very high quality water,” says SFPUC Assistant General Manager of Water

Thursday, June 12th, 2014

This has got to be the SFGov PR blunder of the year 2014:

I would not call it less pure at all. I would call it very high quality water,” says SFPUC Assistant General Manager of Water in a press conference in response to @sfexaminer story pic.twitter.com/dDme0raWw7

I don’t see how you’re going to able to top that.

A Modest Proposal for Steve Ritchie of the SFPUC: Let’s Start Paying Ten Percent of His Salary with Monopoly Money

Monday, April 28th, 2014

From Jessica Kwong of the San Francisco Examiner:

SFPUC Assistant General Manager of Water Steve Ritchie in a press conference in response to @sfexaminer story pic.twitter.com/dDme0raWw7

 “‘I would not call it less pure at all. I would call it very high quality water,’ says SFPUC Assistant General Manager of Water”

And oh, here we go:

“Blending contaminated SF groundwater with Hetch Hetchy supply makes it safe to drink, experts say” by Chris Roberts

You see how that works? The groundwater sources that the SFPUC wants to provide to us don’t pass muster with the Feds as drinking water. So they want to cut it with Hetch Hetchy water and then, and only then, will it meet standards.

Our drinking water will become less pure, right? I mean, that’s the whole plan, that’s the what the SFPUC has decided to do to save money, for better or worse.

Comes now, SFPUC Assistant General Manager of Water Steve Ritchie to state: I would not call it less pure at all.”

All right, well, the reason why SFGov can’t pay Steve Ritchie his inflated, six-figure salary with Monopoly money is because it doesn’t pass muster with the Feds as lawful currency. But what if we cut it with real money, so Steve Ritchie ends up with his salary being paid with 90% real money and 10% fake money?

I wouldn’t call that a pay cut at all. I would call that a “very high-quality” salary, one well above whatever our Federal government requires for the minimum wage.

What say you to that, Steve Ritchie?

A “Ten Percent Request” – The SFPUC Would Like to Lecture You About Water Conservation During These Dry Times

Tuesday, January 28th, 2014

Which is fair enough.

“SFPUC General Manager Harlan Kelly’s Statement on Voluntary, 10% Water Conservation Request

SAN FRANCISCO, CA – San Francisco Public Utilities Commission General Manager Harlan Kelly issued the following statement today regarding a request for customers to voluntarily curtail water use by 10%.

“On Friday, January 31st, the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission will ask customers of the Hetch Hetchy Regional Water System to voluntarily curtail water consumption by at least 10%. Over the next few days, I will be working closely with Mayor Ed Lee, San Francisco city departments and our Bay Area wholesale customers to develop strategies to meet this water conservation goal.
I believe voluntary water conservation efforts are the best way to avert mandatory cutbacks and other water restrictions should drought conditions persist.”

A formal announcement and media availability will take place on Friday. Details will be made available in a press advisory the day prior. The SFPUC provides reliable, high quality drinking water to 2.6 million people in San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara and Alameda Counties.

As always, the SFPUC encourages our customers to conserve water. Here are some helpful tips to conserve water around the house.

1.    Turn off the faucet when you are brushing your teeth or doing the dishes – save 2 gallons per minute.
2.    Take shorter showers. Each minute you cut saves 2.5 gallons. Make sure you or your property owner have installed a high-efficiency showerhead.
3.    Operate your clothes and dishwashers with full loads only, even if the machine has an adjustable load setting.
4.    Use a broom to clean sidewalks, driveways and pavement instead of using a hose.
5.    Reduce outdoor watering needs by planting species appropriate for the Bay Area’s dry climate.
6.    Water during the cool part of the day. Reduce evaporation by watering lawns and plants only at night or early morning before dawn.
7.    Detect leaks. Do you hear the toilet running or your faucet dripping? Contact the SFPUC or your local water agency for information on locating your water meter and detecting plumbing leaks using meter readings. Conducting a dye-test in toilet tanks can identify costly silent leaks.
8.    Install aerators on bathroom and kitchen sinks to reduce indoor water use by about 4%.
9.    Many Bay Area water utilities provide a number of efficient conservation plumbing fixtures for free. The SFPUC provides free faucet aerators, low-flow showerheads and garden spray nozzles to San Francisco residents. Pickup in person with proof of address at 525 Golden Gate Avenue, San Francisco – Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
10.    Replace your old toilet, the largest water user inside your home. New high-efficiency toilet models flush at 1.3 gallons or less compared to older models, which use up to 7 gallons per flush. Bay Area water agencies offer cash rebates for the purchase of select high-efficiency toilets.
11.    Replace your clothes washer, the second largest water user in your home. High efficiency clothes washers can reduce water and energy use by 40%. Bay Area water agencies offer cash rebates for the purchase of select high-efficiency clothes washers.

Updates and additional information will be available at sfwater.org/supplyupdate.

Is the SFPUC Trying to Buy Off the Ocean Beach Bulletin Blog to Promote the “Sunset Greenway Project?” Sure Looks That Way

Tuesday, October 29th, 2013

Take a look.

Kind of reminds me of this outfit, which ended up losing relevance after taking money from the SFMTA.

Is this the kind of thing they call co-option?

(I’ll tell you, I’m the only bay area entity I know that turned down an ad money offer from horrible, horrible PG&E. (Can the San Francisco Bay Guardian say that? No. They’ve done at least one ad deal with PG&E. At the time I thought to myself, “Isn’t it ironic, dont’cha think?”)

As always, JMO.

And for every person who voices an opinion like this, there are ten or a hundred who think exactly the same thing but, they’re, you know, too polite to say anything.

I mean, why not say, “We have a contract with the PUC to promote this project” right on the top of the page?

Something to think about…

OMG, New “Leap Transit” Bus is a Replacement for the MUNI 30X – It’s $6 to Ride the Marina Express One-Way to Financh

Wednesday, May 29th, 2013

[UPDATE: Kevin Montgomery of Uptown Almanac reacts.]

[UPDATE II: The Twitter-stream of one @kylekirchhoff just went private. C’mon, Bro! You gotta engage with the peeps. Today is your big day. It’s not that incrimernating, is it? Bro discusses how much he doesn’t like Twitter, McAfee Antivirus Inc, and how many people got shot on a MUNI #14 last year. You know, all the usual stuff. But I’ll tell you, withdrawing from Web 2.0 is what criminales do, right? You’re just a bro with a bus. Nothing wrong with that.]

[UPDATE III: Aaron Sankin of Huffington Post San Francisco weighs in.]

[UPDATE IV: And now Ellen Huet of the San Francisco Chronicle:

John Avalos, a supervisor who has fought against private companies use of Muni stops, called Kirchhoff’s comments “very disingenuous.”

“What a crock of s—,” Avalos said. “How does blocking a Muni stop make the city more efficient? You’re trying to make money, and you’re creating a two-tiered transportation system in San Francisco.”]

I’ll tell you, I’ve been waiting years for a MUNI alternative to pop up and look, it’s here.

Now I’m not talking about the corporate buses (like Google, Apple, FaceBook and so on) that have been around for a decade or so, and I’m not talking about Uber, Lyft, Sidecar and the like and I’m not even talking about the private version of the taxpayer-subsidized Twitter Express, the 83X.

No no. I’m talking about Leap Transit duplicating the unpopular MUNI Marina Express 30x with a private shuttle bus that costs $6 one-way.

It looks like this, as seen just yesterday:

Via Gregg Meyer

Here’s what the site looks like:

See that? The bus comes with WiFi and leather seats, but they cost three times as much as MUNI. And I’m supposing you and your wheelchair would be better off on MUNI, just a guess. And, oh yes,  you pretty much need an Apple iPhone (or as close an iOS device as possible) to climb aboard.

Now you’d think the MSM would be all over this new company, but no. So far, Leap has escaped notice, except from this bloke called  from Down Under. (Uh, he’s _not_ a fan. I haven’t seen a booting like this since Bart vs. Australia)

“This little blue bus symbolises everything that is wrong with the current bubble and boom of internet startup culture. It’s in San Francisco. It belongs to Leap Transit. And, on May 13, this “better bus” — OMFG, it has leather seats and wi-fi! — began operating as part of what’s billed as a “shuttle service for San Francisco commuters.”

Bonus bon mot:

“This socialized [x] is slow and unprofitable. Let’s start a [x] for rich people that pays its employees less.”

Leave there be no doubt, Leap Transit is a wannabe MUNI disrupter. See?

So far, reaction around town has been mixed.

To wit:

connie hwong ‏@crh17h This has come to my attention: a $6 shuttle from the Marina to SOMA, with leather seats & wifi. Seriously, SF?”

Check it:

I don’t know, if the 30X just passed you by ’cause it’s raining and you see a Leap bus coming at you and you have an iPhone and you’re already signed up, well then Leap just might be worth the six bucks.

A 28-year-old white man wants you to ride his technicolor submarine.

Will you?

All the deets: