Posts Tagged ‘PUC’

Our SFPUC Makes Everybody a Superhero – Somehow – Marketing “CleanPowerSF”

Thursday, October 27th, 2016

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(ClearChannel cleaned up all this glass. which I hadn’t noticed, the next day, but this bus stop gets attacked often, oh well.)

IDK, SFPUC – if everybody’s a superhero then nobody’s a superhero, right?

Lemme just say I don’t understand/am confused by the following on this page:

“Community over Profits” [A Capital “P,” right, Comrades?]

“Because CleanPowerSF is not-for-profit…” [Our SFPUC is a not-for-profit?]

“Your choice will localize energy, create jobs and stabilize energy prices.” [Doesn’t PG&E “create” jobs too? “Stabilize?”]

“Small Premium, Big Impact” [Or Big Premium, Small Impact? Just saying.]

“SuperGreen pay the applicable Green rate plus an additional $0.02/kWh.” [SuperGreen – who dat?]

“That’s a small investment with big returns for the environment and the local community.” [Or extremely small returns?]

“Upgrade your service to SuperGreen…” [But it’s the same service though, right? It’s the same juice from PG&E, right?]

And what’s up with the rates for regular PG&E v. Non-SuperGreen?

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So, best case scenario is that, after a monthly PG&E fee you gotta pay to NOT have PG&E, a “typical” bill will be $66.40, as opposed to … $66.40?

Note that I rounded the numbers there, to the nearest nickel. Speaking of which, why not round PG&E’s percentage up to 30%, you know, why not?

Hey SFPUC, your desks inside the windmill building in Civic Center cost $20 grand each? Hey, is that “sustainable?” Oh, yes, and no? Hey, how about financially?

So many questions about the CleanPowerSF…

Absurdly-Written Flyer from Our SFPUC that Converts You to CleanPowerSF – “Competitive” Rates?

Thursday, October 20th, 2016

Well, here’s the news:

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 has the deets on this option.

“Competitive” means more expensive, right? Maybe not now, but next year, right?

Not that PG&E is so great…

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…but I don’t think our PUC should be so proud of the low opt-out rate for its new program.

Anyway, just by doing nothing, you, the SFPUC customer, are “combating” global climate change. OTOH, if you opt out for the PG&E you’ve had for decades, well, you’re a horrible monster.

That’s the update.

Oy Vey: “OyShaughnessy” – This is How Our PUC Spells O’Shaughnessy These Days

Friday, April 15th, 2016

Welcome to Frisco, SFPUC

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All right, I’m off to OyShaughnessy Dam for a little picnic with Miss OyShaughnessy.  I’ll pick her up at the Cathedral Building on California and then we’ll drive down OyShaughnessy and then go past the OyShaughnessy Seawall. And then I’m going to help track down her sister.

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Brigid seems real nice!

If You Think BROWN IS THE NEW GREEN During Our Great Drought, Get This Free Sign from Our SFPUC

Friday, April 17th, 2015

If you want to do something about the North American Drought of 2012 – 20xx, you can always drop by at our expensive SFPUC building in the western Twitterloin:

“Signage is available for pick-up at the SFPUC Customer Service Center, 525 Golden Gate Avenue, 1st Floor. Request larger quantities by email landscape@sfwater.org”

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These “Rain Gardens” on Fell Street are Now Complete – Will They Make You Like the SFPUC More?

Tuesday, April 7th, 2015

IDK, maybe they will.

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Of course, this design is the “beautiful” version. (What would an ugly rain garden look like, one wonders.)

And look, the “natural” weeds have already been carefully planted. Is our PUC going to water these weeds, you know, during the months and months when we don’t get any rain at all, to keep them green and “beautiful?” We’ll see.

(BTW, if you label the PUC the PUC, at least a few employees / contractors / interns / somebody who has access to the PUC’s email system just might hector you about instead calling the PUC “SF Water,” or SF Water Power Sewer. Let’s hope our SFPUC isn’t paying its employees $114 an hour on the side to email about how “confused” I am with my belief that the SFPUC can, at least sometimes, be rightfully be called the SFPUC.)

But, Gentle Reader, the well-paid PUC outreach people say that you can take a “tour” of these rain gutters if you want. Email at ssip@sfwater.org

Here They Are, Our Brand-New “Beautiful. Functional. Rain Gardens” on Fell – Like Parklets, But for Weeds, Not People

Wednesday, April 1st, 2015

[UPDATE: Our PUC writes in tell about how I’m confusing them with the CAPUC, the same way, one supposes that Mssrs. Matier and Ross got “confused” when calling them the PUC here. But take their tour if you want – see Comments.]

Remember the revival of “Victory Gardens?” I do. It peaked in 2009. But the new thang in urban gardening is upon us.

As seen on Fell, looking inbound:

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(Oh, and the microfences already indicate that no bike parking is allowed. So what’s the PUC going to do? Ticket your ride? Cut off your lock and impound your bike?)

On Fell, looking outbound:

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And look, clobblestones!

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Are these real cobblestones? One can’t tell. Should they be? One doesn’t know.

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All right, that was the windup, and now here’s the pitch, from the SFPUC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of PG&E:

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Are these realtor-backed parklets “beautiful?” I don’t think so. Will they “improve safety?” I don’t see how. And actually, spending tax and fee payer money on “streetscape” “beauty” instead of safety is the opposite of  “improving safety,” PUC. Oh, and PUC, if you ever want to talk about how best to “manage” California’s water resources for the benefit of all Californians, look me up, cause you’re doing it wrong…

All the deets:

Oak Street and Fell Street Pedestrian and Bike Safety Project

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Learn More About the Project

Check out SFMTA’s project website to learn more!

Improving Traffic Safety and Enhancing Stormwater Collection

The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) is teaming up with the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA) on the Oak Street and Fell Street Pedestrian and Bike Safety Project to integrate stormwater management with their traffic calming project.

In response to strong public feedback for more greenery and planting for the project, we’ve added rain gardens to the bulbouts along Oak and Fell Streets. A rain garden is a stormwater management technique which infiltrates stormwater into the soil, diverting water from going into the sewer. This addition to the project will benefit community members; not only will the project make residents and travelers safer, the rain gardens will add beauty and character to the intersections. Our partnership with the SFMTA will extend the improvements already underway. While the addition of green infrastructure will not result in any additional parking losses beyond what was approved by the SFMTA Board of Directors in May 2012, four of the bulbouts will be larger than initially proposed. Originally scheduled for construction in late 2013, the project is slated to begin construction in early summer 2014.

Contact:

For construction inquiries, please contact:

Dadisi Najib – SFDPW
Email: Dadisi.Najib@sfdpw.org

Luis Montoya – SFMTA
Email: luis.montoya@sfmta.com

Ari Frink – SFPUC
Email: afrink@sfwater.org

For more project information, visit SFMTA’s site here.

Great Drought of 2014: Ten Percent Mandatory Outdoor Irrigation Conservation Measures Announced for San Francisco

Tuesday, August 12th, 2014

As expected, here it is:

“Tuesday, August 12, 2014

S.F. Public Utilities Commission Ratifies 10% Mandatory Outdoor Irrigation Conservation Measures

Restrictions Comply with State Water Resources Control Board’s New Emergency Regulations for Outdoor Urban Water Use

San Francisco, CA – On August 12th, the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) passed new emergency outdoor irrigation restrictions for all of its retail customers. The regulations feature a mandate to reduce potable water use by 10% for outdoor irrigation of ornamental landscape and turf. They also require that the SFPUC implement its plan to reduce wasteful outdoor water use.

The new restrictions for outdoor irrigation take effect mid-September and last through June 30, 2015. Only water customers that have metered irrigation accounts will be issued a usage allocation based on a 10% reduction of their 2013 usage. During that September – June timeframe, customers’ usage must not exceed their allocation. Customers will be able to track how they are doing on each bill. At the next scheduled meeting of the SFPUC, Commissioners will consider an excess use charge of 2x the billing rate for every unit in excess of a customer’s allocation. While metered irrigation accounts are the easiest to track, the SFPUC is asking all of its retail customers to comply. Edible food gardens and areas that are irrigated with non-potable water are exempted.

Concurrently, the SFPUC will also be implementing an education-first plan to reduce wasteful outdoor water use by prohibiting certain water-wasting activities, which include:

· Watering outdoor landscapes in a manner that causes excess runoff;
· Using a hose, without a shut-off nozzle, for any purpose;
· Using drinking water in non- recirculating fountains or decorative water devices; and,
· Washing down driveways/sidewalks except for health and safety purposes.

The exemption for health and safety purposes is strictly limited to: the removal of human and animal waste; the removal of liquids and substances that cause odors, sticky, slick and unsafe conditions for pedestrians; and, the elimination of conditions that attract insects and vermin.
Reports of water waste will be tracked through 311. The SFPUC will be focusing on education and training, not policing and fining. Reported water wasters will be sent a warning notice for reported violations. Only after three warning notifications, clear documentation, and a site-visit by SFPUC staff, will citations be considered. Fines will start at $100 per violation and will require approval by the SFPUC General Manager before issuance. Fines are a last resort only and appeals will be routed through the City Controller’s office.
The new regulations will assist San Francisco in meetings its 10% conservation request. Fortunately, customers have consistently met and exceeded the 10% voluntary conservation request this summer. This savings-spree is making up for lost time earlier in the year when customers were not meeting their goals.

– Total Hetch Hetchy Regional Water System storage stands at 61% of maximum storage capacity.

– As of August 4, total water savings has dramatically swelled to 3.9 billion gallons of water – almost triple from what it was on June 23.

– If the current conservation trend continues, the SFPUC projects meeting the 10% savings goal for the entire year. This will stave off the need for additional system wide water restrictions this year.

“We don’t know when this drought will end,” said SFPUC General Manager Harlan L. Kelly, Jr. “The mandatory outdoor irrigation reduction is a small, but important step as we continue conserving and diversifying our precious water supplies.”

The SFPUC provides reliable, high quality drinking water to 2.6 million customers in San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara and Alameda counties. Updates and additional information will be available at sfwater.org/conservation.