Posts Tagged ‘R.’

MUNI’s Brave New World is Truly Orwellian: Like the #5L is Now the #5R? – Because “Rapid” “Sounds Better” Than Limited?

Wednesday, March 25th, 2015

So let’s see here, who’s offered me money, you know, for “outreach” that, you know, I’ve rejected? Well, PG&E and the SFPUC and that slow, clumsy SFMTA, for instance. Of course, some places, like the Bay Guardian (R.I.P.), and a defunct blog from the Avenues, and the MUNI Diaries or the SFBC, take money from those institutions, and in some cases, the dirty money has talked.

But it don’t talk to me.

Now you yourself might know more about MUNI than I, since I’ve mostly ridden bikes since I got here back in the 1980’s, because MUNI is such a remarkably poor transit system.

Having said that, WTF to this:

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One supposes that this is from an internal SFMTA PowerPoint presentation?

So “MUNI FORWARD?” What’s that? IDK. But let’s call it MUNI’s plan. And since we’re translating from marketing / “framing” words into Plain English:

“Investing” = Spending tax and fee payer money

“Customers” = Passengers

“Rapid” = Limited

Oh, here comes the “branding”

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Oh, a pole with a sign on it with the number of the bus? How fucking innovative! (Be sure to get a design patent on your “branding,” SFMTA.) And, what’s this,  you can’t put up plain simple cheap bike racks, you need to promote yourselves, SFMTA? Yish. Now “HISTORIC,” that means $6 one-way, soon enough, just as all the other lines will be $3 minimum, one-way, soon enough.

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[Poles + The airing of grievances = Festivus]

All right, time to pour the old wine into new bottles, or as they say in Japan: “古いワイン、新しいボトル” [Oh, snap!] So forget about the “branding” of the brand-new #5L, that new line that’s not really faster than the regular old #5, not really. Oh, here we go:

The 5L doesn’t really work

That’s from 40 Going On 28, who similarly isn’t on the take from the SFMTA. Anyway, here’s your scorecard showing that the 5L is history:

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(Comrades, the 5L is the 5R, therefore, the 5L has always been the 5R)

The nice thing about the word Limited is that it’s accurate and people understand it. OTOH, calling any particular SFMTA bus line “Rapid” might not be accurate, right?

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And here’s the Good News, Gentle Reader! OMG! Look at all the exclamation points! Wow!

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Of course some things the SFMTA wants to do are good and some are bad.

Hey, MUNI, what about all your antiquated work rules, what about those?

Oh, that’s hard to deal with? Oh, you’d rather just rename things and make PowerPoints? OK fine.

Anyway, we’ll see how this one goes…

*Originally, I had a heavy $199 cr0-molly MTB from Price Club and then I got some other bikes and now my main ride is a heavy aluminum $269 MTB from the Marin Bikes Outlet at 7th and Folsom. Not much has changed, huh? 

Better Know Your California Special “Red Letter” License Plates – What Does “S3″ Mean? What Does “R” Mean?

Thursday, March 1st, 2012

I’ll tell you, if you drive around long enough with a red letter license plate, CHP officers will end up asking you what your license plate means.

The red “S” stands for Senate, as in California State. (Red is their color, it’s their thing. The lower house, the Assembly, prefers to use royal blue.)

The “3” stands for 3rd District, like the one we have on the right side of San Francisco (and on up to Marin and parts of Sonoma County).

And the little “R,” well that means “retired.”

Note that the registration is current. Note that this retired state senator actually paid for his meter space. Hurray:

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Now, you Better Know Your California Special “Red Letter” License Plates.

National Transportation Safety Board Holds Tesla Automotive Employee Responsible for Fatal Air Crash in Palo Alto

Monday, November 28th, 2011

(As always, If You Assume That Any Given Plane Crash is Due to Pilot Error, You’ll Probably Be Right.)

Here’s an article about the new NTSB report.

Does it make sense to commute to Los Angeles for work, assuming you had a pilot’s license and an airplane? I don’t know.

Does it make sense to listen to the advice of your air traffic controller concerning the advisability of taking off into heavy fog, even if you don’t have to? Yes it does.

Is there a reason why pilots are told to turn over the Bay after takeoff? Yes there is.

Oh well.

Here’s what people down Palo Alto Way are saying.

And here‘s the “chilling recording” from a SpotShotter tower. (It’s about what you’d expect, with crashing noises and the yelling of the day care center kids who saw the crash.)

The former N5225J, a Cessna 310R with relatively new, perfectly-fine-at-the-time engines: 

(I’ll tell you, I don’t know why our federal government subsidizes Tesla Automotive (and for that matter, General Monkeybusiness in Detroit). Was Tesla paying for the avgas that this Cessna was burning? Does Tesla reimburse CEO Elon Musk for the jet fuel that he burns as he joyrides around the world, as is his wont? I think Tesla used to, but I don’t know about these days. You know, for an electric car company what’s produced not a whole bunch of electric cars, Tesla seems to burn up a lot of petroleum…)

Anyway, here’s the summary – the whole thing you’ll find after the jump.

NTSB Identification: WPR10FA136

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation

Accident occurred Wednesday, February 17, 2010 in Palo Alto, CA

Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/22/2011

Aircraft: CESSNA 310R, registration: N5225J

Injuries: 3 Fatal.

The pilot departed the airport in near-zero visibility instrument meteorological conditions, and shortly after takeoff, struck a power pole and power lines before impacting terrain. Review of recorded air traffic control tower (ATCT) transmissions revealed that the pilot was initially given his instrument flight rules (IFR) clearance to turn right to a heading of 060 degrees and climb to 3,000 feet. Shortly after verifying his IFR clearance, the pilot received his IFR release from the ATCT controller and was informed that the runway was not visible to the controller. The controller further informed the pilot that takeoff was at his own risk. Shortly after, the controller notified the pilot that he had two minutes for his IFR release, before it expired. The pilot stated that he did not hear a “cleared for takeoff” instruction from the controller. The controller responded that he could not clear the pilot for takeoff, due to not having the runway environment in sight and that “the release is all yours and it’s at your own risk sir.” The pilot acknowledged the transmission and proceeded to take off. One witness, who was adjacent to the accident site, reported that she observed an airplane “suddenly appear from the fog” left of her position. The witness stated that she continued to watch the airplane fly in a level or slightly nose up attitude until it impacted power lines.

Accident site evidence was indicative of a level impact with a power pole about 50 feet above ground level (agl) and at a high airspeed. All major structural components of the airplane were located within the wreckage debris path. Examination of the airframe, engines and propellers disclosed no evidence of any preimpact mechanical anomaly. Weather conditions reported five minutes prior to the accident were wind variable at 5 knots, visibility 1/8th mile, fog, and vertical visibility of 100 feet agl. Weather conditions recorded by the ATCT 11 minutes after the time of the accident were visibility 1/16th mile, fog, and a vertical visibility of 100 feet agl.

Local law enforcement provided recordings from a sound recording system, which captured the accident sequence. The recordings were coupled with airport surveillance radar to interpolate a flightpath for the airplane. The interpolated flightpath indicated an approximate 45-degree left turn shortly after departure to the area of initial impact with the power pole and power lines. A sound spectrum study determined both engines were operating near full power.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot’s failure follow the standard instrument departure as instructed, and his failure to attain a sufficient altitude to maintain clearance from power lines during takeoff in instrument meteorological conditions.”

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OMG, Email the Kabuki Theatre Right Now to See a MAJOR New Film for Free – Sneak Peek on Tuesday, Oct 25th

Friday, October 21st, 2011

Well, I have a guess as to which film this will be.

Hey, what’s this? Is it South African mega-honey Charlize Theron?

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How odd, how did that get here?

Anyway:

“The Sundance Kabuki on Post @ Fillmore will host a special sneak screening of a major motion picture set to release later this year AND THAT IS ALL WE CAN TELL YOU!  We are not allowed to tell you the title, but we can tell you that talent (stars) from the film and the director will be there to talk about the film and what makes this film so special and so different from any other movies these MAJOR award winners have done before.

Tickets are first come, first serve. RSVP to KabukiSneak@gmail.com

 Sundance Kabuki Cinemas 1881 Post Street @ Fillmore

Tuesday October 25, 7.30 pm

Sundance Kabuki 1881 Post Street

Validated Discount Parking

Please note, seating is available on a first come, first serve basis and is not guaranteed.  We suggest you arrive early.

Reminder, only those 21and over may sit in the balcony at the Sundance Kabuki.

One piece of information is that the film is rated R!”

So, if you liked Thank You for Smoking (2005), Juno (2007), and/or Up in the Air (2009) and you want to meet the dude behind them and you like waiting in line with your friends like for hours in cold, dreary, windblown, forever-Starbucks-free Japantown, then don’t delay, email now.

Reading Comic Books and Sucking Down Coca-Colas in North Beach – Good Times with nettie r. harris and Mikey Baratta

Friday, May 13th, 2011

Not half bad, mikey Baratta PHOTOGRAPHIC, not half bad:

mikey Baratta PHOTOGRAPHIC, click to expand

 

Area Billionaire William R. Hearst III Funds Screenwriting Grant

Monday, July 20th, 2009

Hey, are you a “mid-career screenwriter“? (That’s an artful term, huh?) Anyway, you simply must apply for the Hearst Screenwriting Grant, a new joint from the San Francisco Film Society and William R. Hearst III, San Francisco’s favorite billionaire.

(You’re thinking maybe you could take a stab at a remake of Citizen Kane, tell it from Charles Foster’s point of view or something. It’d be a lock, but sadly, adaptations aren’t allowed.)

WRH III as seen talking about how much he loves advertising from a few years back. Remember Revver? I don’t:

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Oh, and hey, when is the Film Society ever going to get their small, historic, three-screen theatre open in the Presidio?

The moribund lobby as it looks today. Sad, in’nt?

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Oh what’s that? Owners of other theaters give money to oppose the reopening of the Presidio Theatre because they don’t want the competition? Bad form, Other Theatre Owners of San Francisco. Oh well.  

Start writing!

Here are the deets:

$15,000 Grant Will Be Given to Foster a Screenwriting Career San Francisco, CA

The San Francisco Film Society announced today an exciting new partnership with William R. Hearst III that will launch the second SFFS screenwriting initiative, the newest element of the Film Society’s rapidly expanding Filmmaker Services program. The Hearst Screenwriting Grant of $15,000 will be given to a mid-career screenwriter who has been a practicing writer for at least five years and who has previously written a minimum of one feature screenplay.

The grant is open to writers residing in the United States whose project expresses both a unique personal perspective and an artistic approach to the subject. Priority will be given to writers whose previous short or feature screenplays have been produced as an independent film. This grant is supported by a gift from William R. Hearst III. The letter of inquiry period for the Hearst Screenwriting Grant opens July 22 and closes August 26. For more information: sffs.org/filmmaker-services/grants-and-prizes.

The Djerassi Residency Award/San Francisco Film Society Screenwriting Fellowship, a one month residency for an emerging or established screenwriter at the Djerassi Residents Artist Program, was announced earlier this month.

Other SFFS screenwriting initiatives in the early planning stages include a screenwriters’ colony at SFFS FilmHouse, script readings with local actors and theater companies, script editing consultations and networking events to connect writers with producers. San Francisco Film Society is a nonprofit arts organization dedicated to celebrating film and the moving image in all its glorious forms. SFFS year-round programs and events are concentrated in four core areas: Celebrating Internationalism, Inspiring Bay Area Youth, Showcasing Bay Area Film Culture and Exploring New Digital Media.

The Film Society shows the best of world cinema year-round on its SFFS Screen at the Sundance Kabuki Cinemas; presents the longest-running film festival in the Americas, the SF International (April 22 – May 6, 2010); publishes a daily online magazine, SF360.org, featuring broad-ranging news and features on Bay Area film and media; annually reaches more than 8,000 students ages 6 – 18 with its acclaimed media literacy programs; and provides crucial support to the Bay Area filmmaking community through SFFS Filmmaker Services including FilmHouse Residencies, Fiscal Sponsorship, the Herbert Family Filmmaking Grants, SFFS Film Arts Forums and professional-level filmmaker classes.

More deets after the jump.

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