Posts Tagged ‘race’

Isaac Mukandi Mwangi Wins the 2015 Bay to Breakers Fun Run – Notable Costumes? The Season One Serial Podcast

Sunday, May 17th, 2015

There he is, in the middle, at about the middle of the race:

7J7C7461 copy

I gotta say, man, the rich white aging homeowners of the Western Addition have really managed to suck a lot of life out of this event – take a look at fan turnout at the Fell and Masonic area just after the front runners had cruised by:

7J7C7492 copy

And now part of your entrance fee goes to paying off some of the millionaire homeowners groups so they don’t complain as much? OK fine.

And here are your costume winners – the Season One Serial podcast:

KPP43uS copy

I guess that’s Adnan’s Nokia calling Nisha, a high school mash note, convicted killer Adnan, and a Baltimore area Best Buy store.

If You Want an Urban Fun Run, But Not Too Urban, IYKWIM, Then Enter the BtoB – Look, It’s 90%+ White People!

Wednesday, May 6th, 2015

I can’t believe this is an official Bay to Breakers promotional image, but there you go:

Capturefgfuu7u copy

(I guess SPUR won out in the Western Addition / Fillmore / Hayes Valley after all.)

The only thing whiter than this in the 415 is the collection of Western Addition millionaire homeowners who cry about the BtoB each and every year.

(Oh what’s that, you’re a “leader” of NOPNA, but you’re not a aging white millionaire home-owning fussbudget? Well then I’d like to meet you, ’cause you’re a rare bird indeed.)

Welcome, once again, to Frisco, BtoB!

Vaunted BMW i8 Hybrid on the Streets of San Francisco – Tacky “Keigwins Safety Car” Blocks the Box in the Financh

Tuesday, March 17th, 2015

Isn’t it ironic, dontcha think? It’s like rain on your wedding day, in’nt? (Actually, it’s not at all like rain on your wedding day – that’s what makes it ironic.)

If you embarrass easily, this isn’t the ride for you:

P1190661 copy

Hey, how many cylinders in the engine? You’ll never guess.

7J7C3839 copy

How about three? Three cylinders.

Apparently, that’s good enough to allow this hybrid the carpool lane.

In conclusion, meh.

Who’s Looking Out for San Francisco Taxpayers? The Republican Caucus of the State Senate – America’s Cup Fiasco

Thursday, January 1st, 2015

Well, Larry Ellison has decided to take his little boat race to Bermuda for 2017. Now here’s the coda to his scandal-plagued 2013 effort in the 415. It was written last year but it’s still pretty much up to date:

Briefing Report: America’s Cup – The Economic Boon That Wasn’t

What a burn.

From the conclusion of the analyst’s full report:

Because both the America’s Cup Organizing Committee’s fundraising and tax revenues generated by the America’s Cup events fell short of the original projections, the City’s General Fund incurred net costs of nearly $6.0 million and the Port incurred net costs of nearly $5.5 million, totaling nearly $11.5 million.

Moreover, according to the Budget and Legislative Analyst’s Office, it would appear that San Francisco also failed to meet expectations of job creation and small business involvement:

The impact of America’s Cup tourism on hotel occupancy was minimal with increases in hotel occupancy rates during the events generally less than one percentage point versus prior non-event years.

The Event Authority did not notify or work with the Office of Economic and Workforce Development (OEWD) to recruit San Francisco residents for Event Authority Contracts in 2012.

The America’s Cup provided jobs for 517 city residents out of a total of 2,800 jobs (note original projections stood at 8,840 new jobs).

Neither the Event Authority nor OEWD sufficiently tracked small business participation in Event Authority contracts.

What an embarrassment.

Video: RedBull “SteepCrest 2014″ on De Haro in Potrero Hill – Bike and Skateboard Ramp Jumps – Kind of a Nothingburger

Monday, November 24th, 2014

I’d wondered why I hadn’t heard of any coverage of this one.

It was kind of a nothingburger. See?

I don’t know, if Red Bull wants to start shutting down streets to promote itself, I think it could come up with some better ideas.

Here are just a few. Hey RB, try to be more like this:

Just saying.

In a Way, the Great Car Towaway of Bay to Breakers 2014 Has Already Begun – Will You Pass This Parking IQ Test?

Friday, May 16th, 2014

Begin:

Look at these workers throwing signs over parked cars and into Golden Gate Park just yesterday. SFGov is required to give a little notice, so this is how they do it. Is it enough? Well, IDK. It’s certainly not enough for some people. (But think of the poor tow truck drivers who want to rifle through your car for loose change and folding money – they’re sort of people too, right?)

Here’s what the signs say:

So if you see the signs and then make sure to move your car off of Fell or Hayes or all those other streets, you pass the test – cngrats.

But if you parked your car before the towaway signs  went up, well, you’ve been towed and that will run you somewhere between $500-$1000.

Welcome to San Francisco!

If the NIMBYs of Alamo Square Don’t Like the Bay to Breakers Party, Then What About This Monstrous Radiation Machine/Cell Phone Tower?

Thursday, May 15th, 2014

Be afraid, NIMBYs.

Be very, very afraid.

And make sure to inventory every slight you experience this Sunday and then repeat all of them to everybody you know for the the following two weeks so that everybody can now how  you, the poor millionaire homeowner, has suffered uniquely owing to this street party what existed long before you were even born.

And just look at it – it’s pointed right towards you! Arrrgh!

Click to expand

Enjoy your cellphone tower, Western Addition.

A Small Victory: Organizers Finally Recognize Hayes Street Hill is NOT the Highest Point of the Bay to Breakers

Thursday, February 27th, 2014

First things first, let’s prove that the top of the Hayes Street Hill on Hayes Street is not the highest point of the current B to B route.

Here’s a route profile, starting from the SoMA near the bay going all the way to the breakers of Ocean Beach. See that big incline just before mile marker three? That’s the vaunted Hayes Street Hill. 

Via Mishalov.net:

And here’s another shot at it:

And here’s a contour map of the Hayes Street area:

But here’s your winner. It’s the 270-something-foot-high saddle on JFK Drive betwixt Prayer Book Cross and Stow Lake / Strawberry Hill, just underneath where “KENNEDY” is written:

So that’s it.

From the organizers:

“Under Armour will have a strong race day presence as the official sponsor of the notoriously challenging “Hayes Hill,” awarding prizes to the fastest hill runners from select racing categories.”

(People from around here call it Hayes Street Hill, but otherwise this is fine. The name of the hill itself is Alamo Heights.)

This was what the organizers used to say every year:

“Around the 2.5-mile mark runners climb an 11.15% grade between Fillmore and Steiner, bringing them to the highest point in the race, approximately 215 feet above sea level. The remainder of the course gradually flows downhill alongside the Panhandle and through Golden Gate Park.”

So yeah, the course gradually flows downhill, but only after peaking in Golden Gate Park.

All right, let’s see how the MSM handles this in 2014…

Someday I’ll Get Me a Ford Mustang with “TRACK” Written on the Side – That Will Change Everything!

Wednesday, January 8th, 2014

No no, even better, I’ll get me a Crown Victoria rental car, paint “STREET” on the side and then take it up to Sonoma Raceway for a few laps.

Click to expand

IRL, I’d be embarrassed to drive this rig around…

The “Bay Area Council Economic Institute” Denies Failure re: the America’s Cup – The BACEI Shouldn’t be Trusted

Tuesday, December 10th, 2013

A few notes here. The “thrilling comeback by Oracle Team USA” was tainted by the cheating scandals involving …Oracle Team USA, wasn’t it? The so-called “economic impact” is about 96% lower than the highest number initially given by … the BACEI. The 3,800 “jobs” referred to are in fact … merely job-years, so, in fact, all the “jobs” “created” are now gone and some of the “jobs” “created” paid less than minimum wage, and some of the workers still haven’t been paid as agreed, and lots of workers came up from SoCal since billionaire Larry Ellison was too cheap to pay Bay Area workers. The America’s Cup “captivated a worldwide audience?” No it did not. And of course the America’s Cup “produced tax revenue” but it also stole tax revenue from San Francisco and net result is a loss to the tune of millions of dollars.

I’ll note that there’s no apology for what everybody now knows was a flawed study from the BACEI in 2010. It’s all spin.

The 2010 report was a big pile of garbage. This after-the-fact press release is a smaller pile, but it’s still garbage.

OTOH, if you want to promote some event in the bay area and you need some wildly optimistic numbers in a report, the BACEI is the corrupt think tank for you.

All the deets:

HOSTING 34TH AMERICA’S CUP GENERATES $550 MILLION IN ECONOMIC ACTIVITY, CREATES MORE THAN 3,800 JOBS

SAN FRANCISCO, CA – The thrilling comeback by Oracle Team USA in the 34th America’s Cup capped an historic event that generated $550 million in economic activity, created more than 3,800 jobs and contributed almost $6.6 million in tax revenue to the City of San Francisco, according to the Bay Area Council Economic Institute.

These figures include a new cruise terminal whose construction was accelerated by the America’s Cup races in San Francisco. In the absence of a new cruise terminal, conservative estimates show that the America’s Cup generated $364 million in economic activity, created almost 2,900 jobs and contributed almost $5.7 million in tax revenue to San Francisco.

The figures also do not include economic activity created throughout the region, local and Bay Area visitor spending, or the benefits associated with gripping media coverage of the high-tech competition that captivated a worldwide audience and showcased the Bay Area as an international tourist destination.

“The $550 million in economic activity generated by the America’s Cup is substantial,” said Sean Randolph, President of the Bay Area Council Economic Institute. “The activity benefitted hundreds of small businesses and other employers in San Francisco and the Bay Area and produced tax revenue that supports a wide range of important city services.”

The economic benefits came from almost $280 million in overall spending by the various teams that competed, the hundreds of thousands of visitors that flocked to the waterfront to watch the most innovative and technologically advanced sailboats in the world and the many events that accompanied the races.

“Hosting the 34th America’s Cup in San Francisco showcased our beautiful City to the world and brought thousands of new jobs, long-overdue legacy waterfront improvements, international visitor spending, and a boost to our regional economy,” said San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee. “Our investment brought in significant revenue to the City and the lessons we learned will help us deliver even better world-class events in the Bay Area in the future.”

The bulk of the tax revenue — almost $3.7 million — came from hotel stays, while payroll-related taxes produced $2 million and tax revenue from parking and retail spending combined reached $2.1 million.

The largest segment of economic benefits — $126.7 million — stemmed from spectators who traveled to San Francisco to watch the competition’s sleek catamarans zip across the bay at speeds approaching 55 miles per hour.

A full Economic Impact Report will be issued before the end of the year.

# # #

About the Bay Area Council Economic Institute
The Bay Area Council Economic Institute is a partnership of business with labor, government, higher education and community leaders that works to support the economic vitality and competitiveness of California and the Bay Area. It produces authoritative analyses on key economic issues in the region and the state, and mobilizes leaders from diverse backgrounds around targeted policy initiatives. A sought-after source of economic perspective, its public-private governance and fact-based approach to economic analysis underpin the Institute’s forward-looking thought leadership (www.bayareaeconomy.org).

Rufus Jeffris | Vice President, Communications | BAYAREA COUNCIL
353 Sacramento Street, 10th Floor | San Francisco, CA 94111
O: 415-946-8725 | M: 415-606-2337 | rjeffris@bayareacouncil.org
www.bayareacouncil.org