Posts Tagged ‘radar’

The Speed Limit on Western JFK Drive in Golden Gate Park is No Longer Just 10 MPH – “SLOW DOWN”

Monday, August 29th, 2016

IDK, maybe somebody hacked this sign to say what it says. Regardless, this is a big improvement over the 10 MPH sign it used to be just a few days back:

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More changes are coming for this area, before 2017, to prevent you from using JFK the way you’re used to…

The Speed Limit on a Stretch of JFK Drive is Now 10 MPH

Tuesday, August 16th, 2016

This official “SLOW TO 10 MPH” sign was up near Speedway Meadow during Outside Lands 2016, but it’s still there now long after OL’s blown town:

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The limit goes back up to 25 MPH near 30th Avenue?

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(This trailer doesn’t “see” bikes, AFAIK, unlike some others.)

Changes to the “access” we have to JFK are coming soon, but I don’t know what they are and if this is a part of it.

Our Presidio sometimes records license plate numbers and checks timestamps to see who’s “cutting through” the park (instead of having the Presidio as a destination in itself). The Presidio People think “Cut Through Traffic” is evil, but really, all traffic is cut-through traffic to somebody. Oh well.

If SFGov wants people to use Fulton instead of JFK, there will be some problems with that…

Stealth Cruiser: This Aging Toyota Must Be Invisible on Radar – A Very Bumpy Car

Monday, May 23rd, 2016

See?

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The Anatomy of the Great SFPD SENIOR CITIZEN FACILITY Speed Trap on Fulton

Friday, September 11th, 2015

Here it is, looking west at around 37th Avenue:

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And here’s what you should be looking at – the aging SFPD SUV with radar on the left, the 30 MPH speed limit sign in the middle, and the SPEED LIMIT 25 MPH / SENIOR CITIZEN FACILITY signs on the right:

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Read all about it here, courtesy of a disgruntled Prius driver what got a ticket last year, when the speed limit zones on this stretch of Fulton went 35-25-35. As you can see, these days it goes 30-25-30, but the concept’s the same.

One would think SFGov would want to put in a few more traffic signals in this area, but one would be wrong.

Anyway, here’s the perspective from inside a police car via Stanley Roberts of People Behaving Badly fame: Fulton 500 Speedway.

What Should Be the Speed Limit for Bicycles on Golden Gate Bridge?

Thursday, December 18th, 2014

I don’t know. Some consultant came up with 10 MPH a few years back, but that idea wasn’t good for business, or something like that.

Now here’s a sign that tells you how fast you’re going, anyway:

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Sometimes, I just don’t know…

OMG, the SFPD is Now Using Radar Guns to Enforce the New Lower Speed Limit on Masonic – “It’s an Illegal Outrage!”

Tuesday, September 3rd, 2013

Well, gee, this is new.

First of all, I’ve never seen the SFPD driving around in one of their new-fangled Ford Taurus POLICE INTERCEPTERS*

And second of all,  I can’t recall seeing the SFPD using handheld radar guns pointed out the rolled-down window of a radio car,** in all my years.

An officer “likes” his Kustom Signals Directional Talon Radar Gun,  pointed southward on Masonic Boulevard over the Labor Day weekend:

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A bystander on one of the gratuitously super-wide sidewalks of Masonic said that this cop using radar on this street was, “an outrage, an illegal outrage.”

Which I don’t think is true, actually.

The SFPD has said for a long time  it uses radar for speed enforcement, but its spokespeople are cagey about it, I don’t know why.

Now I’ll tell you, this scene was south of Fulton (which of course has a much higher maximum speed (35 MPH at least in the Richmond)), compared with Masonic’s 25 MPH) betwixt Hayes and Grove and most of the speeding goes on north of Fulton,  in the hilly area south of Anza, where there are just two signals and they are more or less synced.

Anyway, in a land where we can’t put up proper cell phone towers, the police are allowed to point radar guns at you from cars.

Go figure.

*Which is just a ridiculous name for a car. Intercepter actually can mean something in a military*** setting, but using the term for a regular old police car is 100% marketing. How about “heavy-duty” or “police special” instead, Ford, you know, for your ugly, ugly big-on-the-outside, small-on-the-inside Taurus?

**Radar carts, sure, and the motor patrol, sure, but not from a parked car.

***Yes, the US Coast Guard is a branch of the military, the smallest branch, AAMOF.

Turns Out That You Can’t “Win” Strava “King of the Mountain” in the Marin Headlands Without a Lot of Speeding

Friday, September 21st, 2012

You know, on your bike, on Conzelman, coming down from Hawk Hill at an average speed of 31 MPH.

See?

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What’s the limit on Conzelman, uphill or down? 25 MPH.

Do people get tickets from the park police for speeding on Conzelman? I don’t know, but I know people driving cars do.

Is that San Francisco-based Strava app affecting how people behave?

Well That’s It: The Bay Area’s Formerly-Secret U.S. Navy “Sea Shadow” Stealth Ship Auctioned for Scrap Today

Friday, May 4th, 2012

Just like it was on eBay.

But back in the day, this ship was all that.

See?

The auction ends on Friday May 4, 2012. The buyer will be required to cut up this stealth ship for scrap. Current bid is $300k.

Oh well.

This boat was built here in the Bay Area and now it’s about to die here.

All the deets, below.

Remember  back when Bay Areans could espy the straight-outta-Redwood-City $200-million Sea Shadow stealth ship bobbing about in San Francisco Bay? Check this video from down Fun Diego way over at Telstar Logistics to see this baby in action.

Say it aloud: Super-Secret Sea Shadow Stealth Ship, Super-Secret Sea Shadow Stealth Ship, Super-Secret Sea Shadow Stealth Ship! This project was so secret that it didn’t make the Bay Area newspapers up until 1999, when this boat was identified as an airplane three times by the San Francisco Examiner.*

But lately, the ex Sea Shadow just sits around in the mothballed Ghost Fleet of the East Bay over in Benicia. Check out these great photos from Amy Heiden. Pretty boss, huh?

Now the first time the Navy tried to get rid of this historic boat, in 2006, they had all sorts of rules. Then they tried again in 2009 with more flexible rules. But the problem is that you can’t just take the Shadow, you also have to take the Hughes Mining Barge (HMB-1), a floating drydock boat that was developed as part of Project Jennifer. (That was the semi-successful, top-secret effort mounted by the Central Intelligence Agency to salvage the remains of the Soviet submarine K-129 from the ocean floor.)

Here’s a shot of  them together, ignore the two conventional warships in the background:

But wait, there’s more. Here’s how the Sea Shadow is laid out on the inside:

The bridge of Grant Imahara’s future evil lair. (Boy, talk about a glass cockpit, huh?)

And here’s how she looks from the outside:

You want. However, nobody set up a 501(c)(3) nonprofit and take these things off of the Navy’s hands. So now an important piece of Bay Area military history (and film history what with it inspiring the bad guys’ floating lair in Tomorrow Never Dies) is a gonna get scrapped.

Here’s what came next, after the Shadow got mothballed – it’s the all-aluminum Sea Fighter, as seen back in 2006:

via Telstar Logistics

The point being is that the aging Sea Shadow is the ur-ship, the JetFire of the stealth boat world. Why didn’t anybody save her?

Check out the owner’s manuals – pretty soon, that will be all that’s left…

Ever more deets, after the jump.

*From 1999: “The combined Navy-Marine exercise included overflights of the Bay Area by the Sea Shadow, the Navy equivalent of the stealth bomber.” No, this thing can’t fly, it just floats. Veteran SF Chronicle writer Henry K. Lee got that right but others did not. Nevertheless, SFGate.com, San Francisco’s online newspaper, remains an invaluable resource.

(more…)

Well That’s It: The US Navy is Scrapping the Bay Area’s $200 Million Super Secret Stealth Ship – R.I.P. Sea Shadow

Tuesday, June 21st, 2011

The United States Navy has given up on the idea of giving away to a good home the formerly spr sekrt stealth ship Sea Shadow. That means that this expensive piece of Bay Area military memorabilia will soon be cut up for scrap.

Oh well.

Good bye, IX-529.

But we’ll always have memories, like right here – check it out, from back in the day last year.

All the deets:

Remember back in the day, back when Bay Areans could espy the straight-outta-Redwood-City $200-million Sea Shadow stealth ship bobbing about in San Francisco Bay? Check this video from down Fun Diego way over at Telstar Logistics to see this baby in action.

Say it aloud: Super-Secret Sea Shadow Stealth Ship, Super-Secret Sea Shadow Stealth Ship, Super-Secret Sea Shadow Stealth Ship! This project was so secret that it didn’t make the Bay Area newspapers, excepting for 1999 when this boat was identified as an airplane three times by the San Francisco Examiner.*

This is what she looked like, coming out in the daytime when she was no longer so very supr sekrt:

Guess what, the U.S. Navy wants to give her away for free! The problem is that there are no takers as of yet, so the ex Sea Shadow just sits around in the mothballed Ghost Fleet of the East Bay. Check out these recent photos from Amy Heiden. Pretty boss, huh?

Now the first time the Navy tried to give away this historic boat, in 2006, they had all sorts of rules. Then they tried again in 2009 with more flexible rules. But the problem is that you can’t just take the Shadow, you also have to take the Hughes Mining Barge (HMB-1), a floating drydock boat that was developed as part of Project Jennifer. (That was the semi-successful, top-secret effort mounted by the Central Intelligence Agency to salvage the remains of the Soviet submarine K-129 from the ocean floor.)

Here’s a shot of  them together, ignore the two conventional warships in the background:

But wait, there’s more. Here’s how the Sea Shadow is laid out on the inside:

The bridge of Grant Imahara’s future evil lair. (Boy, talk about a glass cockpit, huh?)

And here’s how she looks from the outside:

You want. Why don’t you start up a 501(c)(3) nonprofit and take these things off of the Navy’s hands? Otherwise an important piece of Bay Area military history (and film history what with it inspiring the bad guys’ floating lair in Tomorrow Never Dies) is a gonna get scrapped.

Here’s what came next, after the Shadow got mothballed – it’s the all-aluminum Sea Fighter, as seen back in 2006:

via Telstar Logistics

The point being is that the aging Sea Shadow is the ur-ship, the JetFire of the stealth boat world. Won’t you save her?

O.K., first things first. Check out the owner’s manuals and start writing your business plan. (And, oh yes, while you’re at it, scrape up some cash. Lots and lots and lots o’ cash.)

Happy sailing!

The Navy’s announcement, after the jump.

*From 1999: “The combined Navy-Marine exercise included overflights of the Bay Area by the Sea Shadow, the Navy equivalent of the stealth bomber.” No, this thing can’t fly, it just floats. Veteran SF Chronicle writer Henry K. Lee got that right but others did not. Nevertheless, SFGate.com, San Francisco’s online newspaper, remains an invaluable resource.

(more…)

The U.S. Navy Wants to Give Away the Formerly Super Secret Sea Shadow Stealth Ship

Thursday, February 4th, 2010

[UPDATE: Well that’s it, the Dream is Dead, as of June 2011. She’ll be cut up for scrap, per the Fox News…]

[UPDATE 2012: There were no takers. just like before, so she is gone – see SFist entry here.]

Remember back in the day, back when Bay Areans could espy the straight-outta-Redwood-City $200-million Sea Shadow stealth ship bobbing about in San Francisco Bay? Check this video from down Fun Diego way over at Telstar Logistics to see this baby in action.

Say it aloud: Super-Secret Sea Shadow Stealth Ship, Super-Secret Sea Shadow Stealth Ship, Super-Secret Sea Shadow Stealth Ship!

This project was so secret that it didn’t make the Bay Area newspapers, excepting for 1999 when this boat was identified as an airplane three times by the San Francisco Examiner.*

This is what she looked like, coming out in the daytime when she was no longer so very supr sekrt:

Guess what, the U.S. Navy wants to give her away for free! The problem is that there are no takers as of yet, so the ex Sea Shadow just sits around in the mothballed Ghost Fleet of the East Bay. Check out these recent photos from Amy Heiden. Pretty boss, huh?

Now the first time the Navy tried to give away this historic boat, in 2006, they had all sorts of rules. Then they tried again in 2009 with more flexible rules.

But the problem is that you can’t just take the Shadow, you also have to take the Hughes Mining Barge (HMB-1), a floating drydock boat that was developed as part of Project Jennifer. (That was the semi-successful, top-secret effort mounted by the Central Intelligence Agency to salvage the remains of the Soviet submarine K-129 from the ocean floor.)

Here’s a shot of  them together, ignore the two conventional warships in the background:

But wait, there’s more. Here’s how the Sea Shadow is laid out on the inside:

The bridge of Grant Imahara’s future evil lair. (Boy, talk about a glass cockpit, huh?)

And here’s how she looks from the outside:

You want. Why don’t you start up a 501(c)(3) nonprofit and take these things off of the Navy’s hands? Otherwise an important piece of Bay Area military history (and film history what with it inspiring the bad guys’ floating lair in Tomorrow Never Dies) is a gonna get scrapped.

Here’s what came next, after the Shadow got mothballed – it’s the all-aluminum Sea Fighter, as seen back in 2006:

via Telstar Logistics

The point being is that the aging Sea Shadow is the ur-ship, the JetFire of the stealth boat world. Won’t you save her?

O.K., first things first. Check out the owner’s manuals and start writing your business plan. (And, oh yes, while you’re at it, scrape up some cash. Lots and lots and lots o’ cash.)

Happy sailing!

The Navy’s announcement, after the jump.

*From 1999: “The combined Navy-Marine exercise included overflights of the Bay Area by the Sea Shadow, the Navy equivalent of the stealth bomber.” No, this thing can’t fly, it just floats. Veteran SF Chronicle writer Henry K. Lee got that right but others did not. Nevertheless, SFGate.com, San Francisco’s online newspaper, remains an invaluable resource.

(more…)