Posts Tagged ‘Rajiv Bhatia’

It’s Food Day: Watch “Food Deserts: Legal, Social, and Public Health Challenges” Live from UC Hastings at 1:00 PM

Monday, October 24th, 2011

OMG, it’s Food Day 2011, so check the link to see what’s going on about the Bay Area today.

Here’s the manifesto:

At UC Hastings in Civic Center, the UCSF / UC Hastings Consortium on Law, Science & Health Policy will put on Food Deserts: Legal, Social, and Public Health Challenges starting at 1:00 PM.

Watch it on the livestream, why not? Or see about heading over to this free event yourself.

All the deets:

“Food Deserts: Legal, Social, and Public Health Challenges

Start: 10/24/2011 from 1:00 PM to 7:00 PM
Location: 200 McAllister, Alumni Reception Center

The UCSF / UC Hastings Consortium on Law, Science & Health Policy is sponsoring a conference entitled “Food Deserts: Legal, Social, and Public Health Challenges” on Food Day, October 24, 2011.
The conference will bring together scholars from the health sciences and the law, as well as policymakers, activists, and food industry members, to discuss two important aspects of “food deserts,” places where access to a nutritionally-adequate diet is severely restricted.

One panel, Nourishing Our Neighborhoods: Insights from Law, Planning, and Industry, will cover the broad issue of geographical food deserts, usually urban areas inhabited by mostly-poor people whose transportation and finances are limited, where food sellers are predominantly small stores that cannot stock a wide variety of fresh food items, and where full-service grocery stores hesitate to locate. Are there policies (such as those in zoning rules) that could be changed to enable oases in these food deserts? What impact does, for example, the addition of a full-service grocery store have on the health of the neighboring area?

Another panel, Food and Nutrition in Correctional Institutions, will consider issues relevant to prisons and jails. While food offerings must meet certain basic caloric and nutritional requirements, the institutional nature of food preparation and food service might make that food less than appealing, and the healthier elements of meals might well be those not regularly or fully consumed. The supplemental food offerings – those for sale in these institutions – are not likely to be nutritious. Some research suggests that improved nutrition in prisons leads to improved penal outcomes. If that is so, what policy changes should be implemented? Would such changes be cost-beneficial, considering penal outcomes and the government’s responsibility for health care of prisoners?

At 5 pm, Dr. David Kessler, former Commissioner of the United States Food and Drug Administration and Professor of Pediatrics and Epidemiology and Biostatistics, UCSF, will give the keynote address on The End of Overeating. This conference will be free and open to the public.”

Ever more deets after the jump

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Half of Chinatown Restaurant Workers Make Less Than Minimum Wage per Chinese Progressive Association

Friday, September 17th, 2010

Do you like reading reports? Well, today’s your lucky day. You’ll get to read all about how restaurant workers get treated in San Francisco’s Chinatown after today’s lunchtime news conference.

This draft report from last year should whet your appetite. It’s big, baby:

Health and Safety in San Francisco’s Chinatown Restaurants (.pdf)

The final report is called Check, Please! Health and Working Conditions in San Francisco’s Chinatown Restaurants. You should be able to find it here starting later on today.

This is the kind of thing that investigators looked at:

All the deets:

Study Finds 1 out of 2 Workers Making Below Minimum Wage in San Francisco Chinatown Restaurants: Millions Lost to the Local Economy Every Year

Friday, September 17th, San Francisco, CA – Chinatown restaurant workers in conjunction with the Chinese Progressive Association (CPA) and key research partners will release a study that exposes sweatshop conditions in restaurant workers in the popular tourist district Chinatown. This groundbreaking report examines health and working conditions in Chinatown restaurants, with over 400 workers interviewed by their peers, and lays out a vision for improving working conditions for a healthy Chinatown.

Speakers: (partial list)

Chinatown restaurant workers
Meredith Minkler, DrPH, MPH, world renowned expert on health and equity, UC Berkeley
Rajiv Bhatia, MD, MPH, Director of Occupational and Environmental Health, San Francisco Department of Public Health
Pam Tau Lee, Labor Occupational Health Program, UC Berkeley
SF Board of Supervisors: David Chiu, John Avalos, David Campos and Eric Mar (in attendance, not all will speak)

Key findings about the working conditions include:

1 out of 2 workers (50%) receive less than minimum wage;
1 out of 5 workers (20%) work more than 60 hours a week;
Nearly half (48%) of workers have experienced a burn injury;
Only 3% of workers have employer provided health care;
and
95% do not receive a living wage

Through this important study, Check, Please! Health and Working Conditions in San Francisco Chinatown Restaurants, Chinatown workers are exposing the sweatshop working conditions that they must endure. While thousands of locals and tourists who enjoy Chinatown each day, workers are struggling to make ends meet and provide for their families. Many workers and their families are forced to live in Single Room Occupancy (SRO) spaces in Chinatown that average about 80 square feet.

All the deets, after the jump

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